Cloud Computing Cracks Job Crisis Conundrum?

Cloud Computing Cracks Job Crisis Conundrum?

As our country continues its procession toward the 2012 presidential election, the nation’s employment woes continue to vex communities and rank as the first concern on the platforms of pundits and candidates. In my opinion, cloud computing should definitely elbow the job crisis on the docket of relevant issues. Recent reports have proven the cloud’s ability to vitaminize American job markets for the long haul, and not solely in IT.

A newly released report and infographic show how cloud computing will create 20,000 new jobs in the City of Brotherly Love, many of them in the information technology sector. Philadelphia will also enjoy the cloud’s “spillover” effect, in that several other job categories (including education, retail, and healthcare) will also experience job growth as a result of the cloud’s influence on efficiency.

Skeptics might blow off this news as a silly Philly phenomenon. Yet the cloud actually stands to amplify jobs worldwide, by up to 30% in 2015. Stateside, an array of major metropolises will enjoy this growth, from perennial powerhouse New York City to the beleaguered Detroit and Washington, D.C. (in which the cloud will magnify its employment presence by 18% and 19.3%, respectively). These figures encompass both public and private or hybrid jobs, further indication that this growth isn’t just a niche venture.

How exactly is the cloud accomplishing such heroic job creation figures? The Sand Hill Group recently published a study gauging the specifics on cloud’s employment potential, which Forbes elaborated on. It found that cloud computing has a brilliant propensity to empower efficiency for even the riskiest type of companies, venture capitals, who relish the cloud for its slashing of start-up costs and seemingly astronomical annual growth potential. The cloud also wins brownie points for enabling small businesses (the lifeblood of American employment) to launch quickly, due to minuscule required investment to get started, and elevating them shoulder to shoulder with big businesses from the get-go.

So we’re clear: cloud computing could potentially remedy American unemployment, at least to a sizable degree. But is this some esoteric hope that escapes the government’s ability, or willingness, to implement it? Refreshingly, no. U.S. Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra recently authored a Federal Cloud Computing Strategy report, detailing how Capitol Hill could capitalize on the technology to improve its own efficiency. If the cloud can improve governmental operations in-house, perhaps the Obama administration will see fit to try the cloud on for size nationwide.

We’d love to hear from you! What are measures you think our gov’t should take to more fully embrace cloud computing and its potential?

By Jeff Norman

About Jeff Norman

Jeff Norman is a freelance writer currently based in New York City. He's moved into writing about cloud computing from substantial work in culture and the arts. He earned his undergraduate degree in English at Stanford and has studied at Oxford and Cambridge.

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