CloudCode: A Code of Conduct For Cloud Computing Providers In New Zealand

CloudCode: A Code of Conduct For Cloud Computing Providers In New Zealand

Because cloud computing is a relatively new industry, it is but expected that it is unregulated. With the influx of cloud services providers and organizations which earn a lot from this industry, there is a thus a need to offer security measures. Thus in New Zealand, these cloud computing groups got together and tried to create guidelines for those entities offering cloud computing in the country.

A fundamental code of conduct for cloud computing providers was put together by the New Zealand Computer Society and named it CloudCode. The code of conduct, however, is voluntary but it’s a start to screen out those providers offering bad services. A CloudCode facilitator, Joy Cottle, said that the code of conduct is not prescriptive but proactive. It aims to be the answer to vendors and consumers needs. It can also be adopted easily by the suppliers and understood easily by the customers.

In coming with CloudCode, the proponents hopes to empower the professional cloud computing providers to demonstrate and benchmark their ethics, processes, and practices through a reputable 3rd party in order to build a trusting relationship with potential customers. This purpose is achieved by adherence to CloudCode. The code of conduct also helps consumers by letting them create informed decisions through the disclosure of practices of such cloud computing service provider thereby empowering them to gain confidence on the providers’ ability to meet their requirements.

CloudCode also demonstrates trust in the Cloud Computing Service Industry by offering a format which can be depended on by both customers and suppliers. Also, the providers of cloud service has the option to increase their compliance level by undertaking extra compliance modules which can offer a higher compliance level in areas of Jurisdictions, Data Formats, HR Procedures, Business Continuity, Service dependencies, Data Transportability, and Security. The drafting of New Zealand’s CloudCode was created by more than 150 IT individuals from all over New Zealand and other countries.

The code of conduct is based on core principles which can be applied to succeeding cloud code practices:

  • CloudCode is banking on existing work on Computing Code of Practice not only in New Zealand but in other countries as well. As much as possible, it prefers any established work rather than create a new one. It is not bent on reinventing the wheel.
  • CloudCode aims to be consistent with Global Structure and Practice so much so that it has taken steps to research any established approaches to resolve core issues in other countries so that the results are consistent with other countries’ practices.
  • CloudCode was developed based on arbitrary approach in order to establish demonstrable good decisions and practice.
  • The project teams and the New Zealand Computer Society only acted as facilitators in the development of the code of conduct in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders.
  • The resultant CloudCode is a product of consensus with the intention to obtain a broad support from a wide range of stakeholders
  • The steering committee ensured the process and principles all adhere to evidence. It didn’t, however, take any part in CloudCode’s development.
  • CloudCode doesn’t require any unnecessary compliance process or cost on those providers which desires to adhere to CloudCode. Only necessary costs and processes are required in order to maintain the integrity of the code of conduct.

The objectives of CloudCode include:

  • Improvement of cloud computing services standards.
  • Set a disclosure standard with the Cloud Computing Industry.
  • Create impartiality between customers and suppliers with regards to privacy, sovereignty, and data protection.
  • Strengthen cloud computing’s integrity in New Zealand.

CloudCode was created for cloud computing service providers which provide IT services which are remotely hosted, whether within New Zealand or from New Zealand, which meet the Cloud Computing’s definition. It doesn’t, however, provide legal obligations for any party adhering to the code of conduct. However, if a provider is found to be falsifying information then they will have to be punished under New Zealand law.

By Florence de Borja

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