Cloud Computing: Is It The Wave Of The Future Or Just A Passing Fad?

Cloud Computing: Is It The Wave Of The Future Or Just A Passing Fad?

Look at me; I’m trendy

Cloud computing in a nutshell is rather easy to understand. Anything that is delivered to an end user from one hosted service over the Internet is a form of cloud computing. There are three main types: IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS. Without boring you with the over-techie end of it all, they are infrastructure-, platform- and software-based. These break down to more complex meanings, but you will sound like you know what you’re talking about if you toss out those fancy letter groupings.

Fad: trimming the fat

For those of you that remember the dotcom craze, it seemed like everyone could get rich overnight. Then the bubble burst, and it all crashed in on itself. To some degree cloud computing is in a very similar situation, right now. Some of the biggest names on the Internet are now deploying some form of cloud computing. Amazon, HP, Intel, IBM, Google, Facebook and Twitter are a few that lead the pack, and there are numerous smaller services popping up too. Does that mean the whole thing is going to crash? Everything has its ups and downs. Cloud computing is still in its infancy with new technologies being made available almost every day that can be used with it. As with any business, however, there are going to be some that stick around and some that will not.

What’s now, and what’s not?

From the public standpoint, cloud computing is rather large. Many people are now using cloud computing for two things. The first of these is storage – everything from MP3s to photos. The general public has found cloud computing to be their universal external hard drive. Give someone the URL and they have complete access to someone else’s information, music, etc. But in the business world, on the other hand, many organizations are taking the opportunity to handle their current workloads and even expand. The cloud gives employees the ability to work from outside of the four walls of the corporate office without missing a beat. Granted, this is a simplistic form of what is currently the capability of cloud computing, but 112 billion dollars are forecasted to be spent on cloud computing in 2012, a large 15% increase over 2011. So, where is that money going?

Money drain or money well spent?

Most of the information that is stored on cloud computers is from the private sector (24%), and that number is slated to grow to 33% over the next 18 months. It is believed that most IT budgets allocate more than a third of their total amount to cloud computing. From the business side, many of the prime players involved with cloud computing believe that budgets will increase even more, and that the money will be well spent as business itself and the manner in which it is conducted becomes reshaped around cloud computing.

Surveys taken from small and mid-sized businesses show that most are not worried about the cost of using or setting up for the cloud. It is the ability to keep data secure and end users’ privacy safe that are the major concerns. So, this is where a large part of the cost is incurred, but is the return on investment worth it? More data can be stored on private computer systems, and the systems in place are increasingly automated, so the worry of keeping twenty computers up-to-date goes out the window when only the hosting computer needs to be current. Increased flexibility and mobility, as well as the ability to give the IT department a chance to focus on day-to-day operations instead of constant server updates, are all important.

Every company, whether large or small, will find their own use and reason for cloud computing and the justification for spending money on it. The future of cloud computing is bright, but it is also a future that should be stepped into slowly and well thought rather than fast paced and poorly planned.

By Emma Joseph

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Cloud Beacons Flying High When Apple debuted cloud beacons in 2013, analysts predicted 250 million devices capable of serving as iBeacons would be found in the wild within weeks. A few months later, estimates put the figure at just 64,000, with 15 percent confined to Apple stores. Beacons didn’t proliferate as expected, but a few…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

Box.net, Amazon Cloud Drive The online (or cloud) storage business has always been a really interesting industry. When we started Box in 2005, it was a somewhat untouchable category of technology, perceived to be a commodity service with low margins and little consumer willingness to pay. All three of these factors remain today, but with…

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

The Digital Twin  How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future. In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global…