How The Salesforce Social Enterprise Cloud Bridged The Gap Between Activision And Its Gamers

How The Salesforce Social Enterprise Cloud Bridged The Gap Between Activision And Its Gamers

Social enterprise clouds enable organizations to collaborate, share information and, most of all, give people the tools to do this in an easy and approachable way. What social means for big companies is how they connect with their customers, and, more importantly, how the company listens to the customer. What social creates for the company is a huge amount of feedback, and it is then extremely important that the company communicates back to the customers in order to give the consumers a feeling that the company is listening and acknowledging whatever they have to say.

What affects customers the most is the language a company uses. Activision recognized that it had been using a distant tone, which made gamers think there was a gap between them and the company; there had been a lot of “Activision says,” instead of “I say, and I am here to help you”. If a company wants to have social as a channel, it has to spread it consistently across all its channels. Alongside 24/7 support, the aspect which is especially crucial for an enterprise is that the employee interacting with the customer needs to have the right level of skill.

With the vast volume of data in the social channel, it was critical that Activision sought the help of a social marketing cloud – Radian6. Salesforce came up with Radian6, which has completely revolutionized enterprises’ experience with their customers. This social marketing cloud gathers all the information together for Activision, and tells the listeners what the real-time experience of a gamer is. Arriving at solutions in a proactive way rather than a reactive way is the deal here.

Just like most big enterprises, Activision loves to engage with its customers, and the need to operationalize the whole experience of customer feedback and get to see what the customers categorically want from a certain game allows this enterprise to reach greater heights.

Salesforce allowed Activision to interact with gamers in a way that worked for them; whether that be through Twitter, Facebook or email. The swarming aspect for expansion is helping Activision solve problems faster and in a user-friendly way. By being a social enterprise and having greater insights into its individual customers, Activision is now able to tailor specific games for its users. Without the cloud, these things would never have been imagined, let alone possible. Technology truly has made us change the perception of the world around us!

By Haris Smith

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