Towards Intelligent Cloud Diagnostics: Well Researched Software Marvel

Towards Intelligent Cloud Diagnostics: Well Researched Software Marvel

A devoted group of researchers at North Carolina State University have painstakingly developed a novel software tool aimed at addressing performance disarrays in cloud computing systems. The tool functions to automatically classify and respond to potential network disruptions before they actually occur.

Cloud computing provides the freedom of creating numerous virtual machines provided to the end-users across a single computing platform – all that functions autonomously. Performance issues with such an approach are bound to occur. In case of a software glitch or a closely related hiccup, problems arising across a single effected virtual machine may end up bringing down the entire cloud down on its knees.

Determination of various contingencies across a system can be simplified by sensing and keeping a track of numerous machine related variables. The software does exactly that. By calculating the current network traffic, extent of memory consumption, CPU utilization, and several other parameters of data within a cloud computing infrastructure, the tool is able to estimate an effective measure of the overall system health. This renders the software flexible enough to formulate an adequate data-range characterization that can be safely considered as being normal. The processor usage, for instance, reflects the amount of computational power being required at any instant of time. The software outlines normal performance for every virtual machine in the cloud, and reports deviation of almost any sort. Based on the aforementioned information the tool predicts incongruities that might potentially affect the system’s capacity to provide service to users.

This particular approach is immensely beneficial in terms of associated benefits, including the all-important savings inherent with the alleviation of personnel training requirement. The software, being entirely autonomous depicts aberrant behavior on its own. In addition, the ability to predict anomalies is a feat that has never been achieved before. Not only that, upon sensing abnormal behavior in a virtual machine, it executes a pre-defined black box diagnostic test that determines which variables (memory usage, for instance) might be affected. The diagnostic data is then used to prompt the suitable prevention subroutine without making use of the user’s personal data in any form.

Helen Gu, co-author of the paper articulating this research marvel and an assistant professor at North Carolina State University explained: “If we can identify the initial deviation and launch an automatic response, we can not only prevent a major disturbance, but actually prevent the user from even experiencing any change in system performance.”

Most importantly, the software is not resource hungry (power in particular) and does not consume considerable amount of processor cycles to operate. It has the ability to fetch the preliminary data and classify normal behavior much quicker than the existing tactics. With CPU power consumption less than 1% of the total and a mere 16 megabytes of memory, the software is bound to pack a punch.

During the testing phase, the program recognized up to 98% of incongruities, which is the utmost as compared to existing approaches. It prompted a mere 1.7% of false alarms. Gu says: “And because the false alarms resulted in automatic responses, which are easily reversible, the cost of the false alarms is negligible.”

The software does sound like a real game-changer altogether. However, commercialization of the said research would eventually reveal the true benefits this tool has in store for the cloud computing industry – fingers crossed.

By Humayun Shahid

 

Best Practices for Cloud-Based Recovery

Download this Whitepaper today to learn more best practices for Cloud-Based Recovery.

About Humayun

With degrees in Communication Systems Engineering and Signal Processing, Humayun currently works as a lecturer at Pakistan's leading engineering university. The author has an inclination towards incorporating quality user experience design in smartphone and web applications.

View All Articles

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Comics
How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Security In The IoT The network security market is experiencing a pressing and transformative change, especially around access control and orchestration. Although it has been mature for decades, the network security market had to transform rapidly with the advent of the BYOD trend and emergence of the cloud, which swept enterprises a few years ago.…

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud Cloud computing is more than just another storage tier. Imagine if you’re able to scale up 10x just to handle seasonal volumes or rely on a true disaster-recovery solution without upfront capital. Although the pay-as-you-go pricing model of cloud computing makes it a noticeable expense, it’s the only solution for many…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…