Flipping The Coin For The Security Of The Private Cloud

Flipping The Coin For The Security Of The Private Cloud

The world of Cloud Computing is a relatively new phenomenon that has even eclipsed the earlier discovery of the web as the most significant development on the Internet. Be it as it may, the new web offering has already elicited healthy debates. One of these is a comparison between the private and public clouds on issues concerning security. While the former is semi-detached from the rest of the web, the latter is encrusted deep into it which often leads to questions of database safety.

Private cloud computing is the typical methodology that provides the entire network as an ensemble to the independent operator. The owner of the cloud literally takes charge of the extremes from the access to the core layers and everything in-between. This is unlike the web-based model that creates a plethora of channels, each having a network that manipulates it.

The private model is common in intranet situations. The most appropriate, though a more expansive example, is the Local Area Network (LAN). However, being in the Cloud, the LAN spans its wings to cover the consumer base, only that here the control is still firmly with the owners of the network.

The security of the model suffers from loopholes within the computers of the LAN that may lack firewalls. Though independent entrepreneurs make it their priority to have many of their inherent members adhere to a certain security measure such as proxy, firewall and the like, some nodes still fail to follow the rules with information leakage as the inevitable consequence.

Additionally, there are the actual cloud computing infrastructural issues to deal with. Since this is an infrastructure that conjoins various administrators and users into one portal, it leads to a break in the wall here and there. This is inevitable of broadband technologies that try to create a compatible layer between phones, tablets and PCs, all in one. Recent studies, for example, show that the mobile network alone is prone to major security hitches.

Thirdly, there is the issue of bringing together different resources. These databases do not necessarily have to be sourced from within the private cloud. This helps to create diversification. Of course this importation leads to some security issues such as bugs from external networks. While most of the data-related concerns are to do with CPU antivirus deactivation and such, some of them are overblown and may lead to machines crashing. Below are a few ways that can overcome the above three examples of cloud issues.

Solutions

The foregoing three issues pertaining to Cloud computing security, in the private model, can all ebb under one trigger: automated systems. Platform as a Service (PaaS) is the best source for the automatic systems. The platform can lead to an even distribution of safety apps in an intranet. It comes with resourceful apps that are in themselves security. Virtually all applications have encryption control over them. The best example is the monetary system where credit and debit cards can never transact business without a password. Since the password requirement applies to the provider and the user alike, it leads to a streamlined cloud that one man can run to serve many.

The first solution regarding to user’s machines is by having the right information systems and high-end CPUs in place. Otherwise, there is no point in offering others delicate networks whose hardware and software is riddled with loopholes. Indeed, one of the arguments for private cloud security is that without dynamic machines together with firewalls, there would be no operations.

It is easy to overcome concerns in the infrastructure by advocating for automated facilities. This means that the system at the access point is open source, which then allows users of phones and an array of other broadband gadgets, to tap into the network without having to install security measures of their own.

Finally, it is important to verify the sources of external data. When the resources are going to the customer, the latter need not have to request permission. It should be a tacit agreement within the intranet community in a private cloud that all their resources are ready to provide because they are bug-free and are highly encrypted. This leads to a system of responsibility within the providers who usually use their high-end machines to entrap bad content. The user will only come to shop for the information like in a supermarket.

By John Omwamba

About John

John posses over five years experience in professional writing; with special interests in business, technology and general media. Driven by passion and 'glowing' enthusiasm, he has covered topics cutting across diverse industries with key target audiences including corporates, marketing executives, researchers and global business leaders. John currently freelances for CloudTweaks as a frequent writer.

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