What Is Hindering Cloud Computing Uptake?

What Is Hindering Cloud Computing Uptake?

Cloud computing is still young, but everybody is talking about it. It’s great for businesses and individuals at different levels of society. Despite these advantages, cloud computing uptake remains low. Some businesses have adopted it partly, whereas the rest have adopted a wait-and-see attitude. The overall attitude is that people are not enthusiastic about moving their business into the cloud. And whereas individual preferences might explain this slow uptake, there are other possible reasons.

1. IT functionalities

IT functionalities are to blame for the slow uptake of the cloud. Matters to do with control, security, and privacy remain a deadlock to cloud penetration. Many IT departments are waiting to see what will happen to those who are already on board before making a decision.

2. Infrastructure problems

Infrastructure is a collective name for all computers and networks powering an organization. Businesses have to consume different cloud services. However, many of their systems are getting old. They lack the capacity that will enable them perform optimally with cloud products. What it takes for these businesses to benefit from these services is a complete overhaul of present infrastructure. Upgrading present systems can also work. However, many businesses are not willing to do this, making infrastructure a leading hindrance to the growth of cloud computing uptake.

3. Talent shortage

There is a clear talent shortage for cloud computing functions. Many IT managers were in school long time ago. They learned different things and are many of them may not be willing to go ‘back to school’ and learn new skills. They are not willing to give up the control they have over business IT functions. Also, very few cloud qualified experts exist in the marketplace.

4. Budget and cost implications

Cloud computing infrastructure can be costly. Businesses may need to acquire new infrastructure before they can start getting the functional cloud benefits. Considering that many businesses have tight budgets and spending constraints in place, cloud computing investment is challenging.

5. Pooling of resources

Cloud computing works by pooling resources. Instead of operating with individual servers, one server is used for all tasks. This has been the premise cloud computing marketing has used to promote their services. Whereas this is amazing, it’s working against the technology. Businesses need resources they can depend on. They want to measure individual output, capabilities, and capacities. With as-pooled resources, businesses have little ability for individual control and measuring of individual effectiveness.

By Walter Bailey

Walter

Walter has been a technology freelance writer for several years. His focus is on Cloud Computing and Big Data.

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