Improving Workforce Delivery Through Telemetric Technology

Collaboration Cloud: Improving Workforce Delivery through Telemetric Technology

In an age where the Internet is a free-for-all medium of communication, a data networking channel and a data base par excellence, it is inevitable that everyone has ever worried about privacy. Ironically, new technologies like collaboration cloud use methods that, for the uninitiated, may seem to breach on that very privacy. One example is workforce delivery software that employs telemetric technology to enhance collaboration, exchange notes and analytically mine data between office departments.

Further from sending a shiver down the spine of the office worker who may fear that the boss may find out all about him or her though this technology, it helps connect people into a productive, less redundant team. Here is an example:

Company ‘A’ has installed software for workforce collaboration. It operates on telemetry programs, meaning that it has to extract and compare data, contextually, from all digital devices in use including laptops, cell phones and computers for the staff. Through it, one department can gather details via sensors about what the other department is working on without communicating directly. This at once reduces telephone bills. After mining sensitive data like when a department holds its meetings, how it collaborates through machines and the most popular tools or brands it uses to leverage on its work, the ‘spies’ will then be able to understand the entire internal collaboration architecture better. They will even come up with suggestions for enhancing cloud collaboration, using the new knowledge they have gathered through their legal prying.

Still, one might be saying that this amounts to nosing into other people’s business. To prove this perception as wrong, most collaboration cloud software that works on telemetry features opt-in and opt-out schedules. Since the team has to set up the program on the PC to create a virtual desktop, they have to keep in mind that other users will need to use the same machine to log in to their Facebook and Twitter accounts. This means that they will be opting-in only during office hours but logging off to normal mode when they are off business.

The above at least quells fears of privacy violation. Furthermore, the system also helps to keep expensive face-to-face crisis meetings at bay.

The very automatic selection of data can help enhance schedules and even make the workers more business-minded. For instance, by keying in the simultaneous schedules of offices A, B and C, minute-by-minute, a CIO can sort out performance issues. Maybe Office A does badly because its meetings happen in the morning hours when everyone should be productive, while Office B does equally poorly because it switches all its schedules for the day at 9 a.m. instead of 8 a.m. thus losing an hour. C’s schedule may prove the best model for the entire organization to adapt because it happens at the very last fifteen minutes of the day so that by 8 o’clock, in the following morning, every worker will be at office following the previous night’s schedule.

The bonus of the above illustration is that it does not require expensive surveys, constant communication with departmental heads or even convening of meetings. It is just telemetry analytics taking their toll.

The secure side of workforce technologies of this sort in collaboration cloud matters is that they rarely keep vital privacy data as they do business information. They come with anti-password retention icons, which help the users to maintain an anonymous presence, especially where social interaction on the Internet is concerned. More so, though collaboration in a workforce ecosystem cuts across financial details of a company, sharing of credit card specifics is only optional to the users of the software facilitating this connectivity.

Other than Telemetry

Collaboration Cloud gets a Midas touch outside telemetry circles by use of calendar-centric technologies. These, including folios, for smartphones, help office workers to keep all their schedules and upcoming meetings in a centralized section.

There are also major multinationals that are embracing a single collaboration ecosystem for their entire world of offices, associates and distributors. Toyota, for example, is employing the Office 365 model on the Azure platform to help improve its collaborative, as well as, telemetry operations in its departments hovering around two hundred thousand workers across the globe.

As such, collaboration cloud is not just about direct cooperation through video teleconferencing or just about being available on demand. It is also about workforce vis-à-vis telemetry technology where companies can mine, evaluate and implement data inflows right from one computer, and from this insight create feasible collaboration models.

By John Omwamba

About John

John posses over five years experience in professional writing; with special interests in business, technology and general media. Driven by passion and 'glowing' enthusiasm, he has covered topics cutting across diverse industries with key target audiences including corporates, marketing executives, researchers and global business leaders. John currently freelances for CloudTweaks as a frequent writer.

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