Finding Links Between The Spectacular Lion King Musical And Cloud Computing

Finding Links between the Spectacular Lion King Musical and Cloud Computing

The Lion King musical is a spectacular rendition, and a down-to-earth theatrical production, that brings the great original film, the Lion King (1994) to the stage. Now, courtesy of its many sequels, impressive commercial and on-stage success, it has spawned a world of its own that can receive review from sales and production viewpoints, under the cloud computing perspective. Firstly, a word about the current musical will suffice. Beginning 1998, the musical has toured many nations, and its latest stage was in Sao Paulo Brazil, March 30 2013, but has slated appearances in May and October, 2014, in various English cities. Given its wild success, here is a look at its gamut of success, cloud-wise, first in sales.

Sales

Given the 2011 release of eight discs to represent the trilogy that includes the original and two stylistically diverse sequels, one can imagine how audiences rushed to purchase these cassettes. However, the contemporary animated film lover can learn the power of minimalism of purchasing discs through the cloud. Amazon, for one, offered not only the films in the Blue-Ray, DVD and Digital formats, but a book that encapsulates the delivery of the movie in breadth.

Amazon, as a cloud provider, thus solves a question of searching for diverse, yet unified products of the same production in various nooks, unsuccessfully. The book, on the other hand, that came out in 1998, stretches the nostalgic pictures of Young Simba, from the eyes of an avante garde producer, who tries to imitate the splendor of the original Lion King on the stage. Now, the cloud aspect comes in handy: for the theater enthusiast who does not have time to travel to Broadway, New York, to see the live production, then here is a book that can relive the same experience. The site reveals that the nearly-two-hundred-page book has spread outs of illustrations and panoramic diagrams that rival those of the film, thus bringing the reviewer closer to the actual production that he or she missed.

On Stage/Plot

Cloud technology also fits quite snugly in contextualizing the plot and actual presentation of the musical that spawned off from the original film. The story where Simba flees his land after the false insinuation by his tricky Uncle that he murdered his father, Mufasa, is an attestation of the many viewpoints that a network as big as the cloud must bring upon users, just like Pride Land, the young lion’s realm is huge. The Circle of Life, a song that seeks to encapsulate all animals in the land, also encompasses the power of the cloud to include all kinds of technologies that merge into one in big data. Another aspect of plot that has parallels in cloud matters is the ‘Hakuna matata’ (no worries) attitude that young Simba takes while in exile, subsisting on ‘bugs’ as his daily bread. This echoes the minimalism of cloud computing: with just a small machine at one’s desk, one can use remote servers to get tetra bytes of information. Thus, it removes bulkiness and reinstates minimalism. No wonder Simba could survive on bugs and yet eventually have the strength to come back and defeat his Uncle and reclaim Pride Land.

Thus, there are ready links, both external and internal, between the latest staging of the Lion King musical and cloud computing. It can be how one can manage to get all sequels in one digital format and in one shopping avenue, or how the plot correlates to the sweeping power of technology, but they all serve as sufficient proof of the relationship.

By John Omwamba

John

John posses over five years experience in professional writing; with special interests in business, technology and general media. Driven by passion and 'glowing' enthusiasm, he has covered topics cutting across diverse industries with key target audiences including corporates, marketing executives, researchers and global business leaders. John currently freelances for CloudTweaks as a frequent writer.

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