Australia Follows US, UK Lead In Embracing The Cloud Nationally

Australia Follows US, UK Lead In Embracing The Cloud Nationally

Australia Follows US, UK Lead in Embracing the Cloud Nationally

The Land Down Under has finally prioritized the use of cloud computing for public bureaucracy, albeit a notch lower than the dedicated approach by two economic powers, on either side of the Atlantic. The Aussie approach of the cloud niche is one of gradual adoption, where necessary, whereas that of Britain and the United States is a ‘do or die’ unilateral approach. It was only last month that the United Kingdom conjoined all IT departments, in public offices, through a single, mandatory cloud infrastructure. Now, Australia has used its National Broadband Network (NBN) to reach out to public institutions, to maximize on the storage, efficiency and economical attributes of cloud computing.

Australia Desert

A Little Low key

Though the state has shown its willingness to achieve great heights by acknowledging the power of technology, nationally, it is, nevertheless, not an all-out run into the cloud. Rather, the government has specified that a huge chunk of the $5b that goes to the Information Technology budget, per year, will branch off to the cloud segment of the sector. Furthermore, the state advised that while it is not mandatory that all mass offices must adopt the technology, particular departments should upgrade to the cloud when it is virtually necessary.

Though jittery about the lack of holistic immersion by the government, analysts are lauding the move, calling it ‘smart,’ especially from an economical point of view. This is the initial step for an industry that will surely receive whole embracing by the country in coming years. Observers are also simmering down the hardcore stand by critics who advise of more government commitment in the sector, by saying that even when the state declines to follow the British lead, it will still reap rewards.

They also call this a prudent move because of the fact that the Land Down Under is not as under similar financial constrains as its more illustrious equivalents, the US and UK. This explains why the administration did not regard the migration to the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) niche, so critical. Indeed, most developing countries, by their very economical dilemmas, have no choice but use the cheap service of compute technology to save costs. Thus, it is not surprise that a well-off economy like that of Australia should stay behind times and wait until when its cloud industry has reached maturity and then act. Who knows but the economy will be better off, then, than it is now?

Skepticism

There are some in Australia, and abroad, who beg to differ on the issue of cloud computing playing second fiddle to IT, in general. They are cautioning that the sector is impossible to do without in the future and thus, the state should have brought about a strong blueprint and deadlines to make this a sector with staying power. As a first move, they are advising that there should have been a plan of gradual adoption of the technology, rather than the sketchy, financial tack that is the current approach.

Others are pointing out to the offshore cloud’s taking advantage of this mechanism in the dearth of a dynamic national program. They say that had the administration decided to strengthen its sector, it could have attracted open source app developers and cloud players from abroad that could have helped develop a unique framework within the country’s borders.

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, however, for Aussie companies. Firms are touting that this move tilted the dice table to their side in that they can wholly immerse themselves in the international market. They say that this is where the future of cloud computing lies. Furthermore, they feel like they can be more competent when they are tackling rivals all over the World Wide Web.

By John Omwamba

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

John

John posses over five years experience in professional writing; with special interests in business, technology and general media. Driven by passion and 'glowing' enthusiasm, he has covered topics cutting across diverse industries with key target audiences including corporates, marketing executives, researchers and global business leaders. John currently freelances for CloudTweaks as a frequent writer.

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