Auto Scaling In Cloud Computing

Auto Scaling In Cloud Computing

Auto Scaling In Cloud Computing

traffic-flow

Cloud computing with its dynamic scaling feature which allows one to scale, that is to increase or decrease, the amount of resources depending on the demand has become a great boon for IT professionals everywhere. This is especially true for environments with very unpredictable traffic flow, like the whole internet for instance. With traditional servers that were preconfigured to handle a certain amount of load, a website might go down especially when traffic has suddenly surged to levels above the capacity of the server. This happens when some sort of news or event leads people to a specific web location. The solution in a Cloud context is to allocate more resources, and in this case allocate more server instances. But do the costs of the additional resources merit the possible profits generated by the increased traffic? Or will they actually be enough to accommodate all of the traffic, and even has a margin for more?

Traffic to a website could be intentionally routed there, as in a traffic campaign, so there might be a certain amount of expected traffic resulting from that campaign. But sometimes the campaign might have done better than expected and website traffic can go way above expected levels, even beyond the capacity of the servers of the newly allocated servers, so the website goes down losing revenue and potential customers. But with auto scaling, a web admin can set governors or settings that will constantly monitor the traffic to look for patterns that indicate that a lot of traffic will be coming in soon, then allocate proper resources to accommodate such traffic before it arrives.

But one of the biggest pitfalls of auto scaling is the recognition part, if it can really recognize legitimate traffic from false requests like those being generated for a denial of service attack. Auto scaling works by sensing the traffic levels and increasing resources automatically by provisioning more instances before other instances would crash. But if the system cannot distinguish between legitimate traffic and those from a denial of service (DoS) attack, then this can go truly bad for the owner of the site. During a DoS attack, the servers are bombarded with a massive amount of requests meant to look legitimate. If the system cannot detect that this is an attack, then it will continue to provision more instances and other resources to keep up with the traffic demand from the attack. There is an almost unlimited resource here so the web site will never go down, but the incurred costs from the pay-per-use model is sure to kill the website. In this case the denial of service attack has become a ”bankrupting” attack. It is times like this that the pay-per-use model of Cloud Computing can be detrimental.

By Abdul Salam

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Cloud Beacons Flying High When Apple debuted cloud beacons in 2013, analysts predicted 250 million devices capable of serving as iBeacons would be found in the wild within weeks. A few months later, estimates put the figure at just 64,000, with 15 percent confined to Apple stores. Beacons didn’t proliferate as expected, but a few…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Hyperconverged Infrastructure In this article, we’ll explore three challenges that are associated with network deployment in a hyperconverged private cloud environment, and then we’ll consider several methods to overcome those challenges. The Main Challenge: Bring Your Own (Physical) Network Some of the main challenges of deploying a hyperconverged infrastructure software solution in a data center are the diverse physical…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…