Finding Meaning In Everything Inside Big Data Via New Chip Technology

Finding Meaning In Everything Inside Big Data Via New Chip Technology

Finding Meaning In Everything Inside Big Data via New Chip Technology

There is much to say about technologies that seek to emancipate the Internet from electronics and release it into the world of people. Indeed, big data has always meant many things all at once, some incomprehensible to many computer users. While one may be using data to operate an airplane, another is churning out information for manufacturing purposes. In short, too much information passes through a typical processor to handle in a day. This is why chip-making giants intend to come up with processors that can compute all sorts of data in one system and reap meaning out of it. While one chip is configuring how to save power for a heating unit user, the other within the machine will be translating cipher than has just come in from a Chinese car manufacturing firm.

More Terabytes of Data

According to a leading chip manufacturing company, the world will be churning out big data that is proportionally 10 times more than it is now, in 2016. This is courtesy of the ubiquitous cloud network that interconnects servers, computers and networks, each with its data to produce. The threat that the processor-making companies want to shun before that information apocalypse sets in is to create meaning out of what we can comfortably refer to as ‘deceivingly nonsensical data’. Why? Everything one finds in the cloud that is impossible to take in at once can only be meaningless.

big-data-planning

Creating Meaning

One only needs to take data from biometrics, manufacturing, information systems, industries, public cams and websites, among others, into one pool to know that big data can be really a headache to decipher. Out of this mishmash, only 10 percent of the content could possibly be structured data. The rest will be raw and it is up to smart technology to decipher it for the user.

This is what creating meaning will be all about once the all-capable processors come into the market. One possibility is to transmute a machine’s artificial intelligence, such as that of the online translator, into systems that can tell what the big data mishmash means. Analytics, luckily enough, is a technique already in use in most search companies. This may also come to the rescue in attaching a comprehensible language to every piece of information that Tom, Dick and Harry sends to the cloud.

Advantages?

If technology comes to pass as parrot-sharp at creating meaning out of data mumbo jumbo, users will have a set of benefits therewith. One of these is that companies will reduce the time they spend configuring unstructured material into usable information. The other will be to keep the user up-to-date with any new solutions that affect them. It might be that a supercomputer has just reviewed hundreds of thousands of terabytes of raw data on energy efficiency and come up with a single technology that can affect the user on the ground. Though much of infrastructure information will remain useless, at least there will be some little bit out of this that will be directly beneficial.

Finally, it will be possible to use comprehensive big data in formats savvy for the most accessible gadget, the cell phone. As innovations at the processor level increase, so will be more structured data become available for the small screen.

At least many sideline occasions highlight the need for making big data accessible. The leading conferences in 2013 on the theme have been directly giving attention to the topic. As such functions increase the knowledge surrounding the technology, and the chip-making companies improve on their innovativeness, the world will by 2016 directly benefit from hitherto inexplicable strings of data.

By John Omwamba

About John

John posses over five years experience in professional writing; with special interests in business, technology and general media. Driven by passion and 'glowing' enthusiasm, he has covered topics cutting across diverse industries with key target audiences including corporates, marketing executives, researchers and global business leaders. John currently freelances for CloudTweaks as a frequent writer.

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