Author Archives: CloudTweaks

Invisible Computing: How Cloud Is Forcing Software And Hardware Apart

Invisible Computing: How Cloud Is Forcing Software And Hardware Apart

Invisible Computing: How Cloud Is Forcing Software And Hardware Apart

By 2018, Gartner predicts that 70 per cent of professionals will conduct their work on personal mobile devices, enabled by the revolutionary concept of cloud computing.

Cloud computing essentially separates software from the logical functionality of local hardware. In other words, instead of needing computing power to be housed locally, major computing functions will instead be accessible from afar, usually via the Internet.

The obvious benefit here is that risk of ownership of software is eliminated, as well as the need to hire in-house resources to service them.

What will this do to the market?

In the case of hardware, cloud computing is likely to open the market up by lowering barriers to entry for manufacturing. The recent emergence of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in the workplace presents renewed scope and opportunity for the hardware market, as by 2016, 38 per cent of businesses expect to stop providing devices to staff, allowing them instead to select their own.

The real question is how cloud computing will fundamentally alter the landscape of the software market. Ever since computers have been adopted for wide scale use in offices, the market has largely operated in the same way. That is to say, businesses have always owned the software that they use.

The switch to cloud computing poses major challenges for software providers in that:

  • They will need to reconsider how their products are designed to ensure optimum functionality via cloud hosting, and;

  • They will need to deal with hugely disruptive business model changes; the lump-sum software sales prices and annual maintenance fees that software creators are used to will have to be converted into monthly subscription fees, distributed at a different pace to what they’re accustomed to.

In addition, customers will pay only for the software and service they actually use, rather than licensing the whole package. What isn’t yet clear is the extent of these financial implications for software providers.

What will this mean for business?


Businesses will effectively be shifting expense from capital to operational, typically with little to no upfront costs. They will also save considerable time and space by no longer needing to house and maintain their own server.

But perhaps more interestingly, as software drifts apart from hardware, businesses’ ability to map infrastructure will become a thing of the past. In fact, when software is accessed via cloud services, activity will take place in a highly abstract space. This is quite revolutionary for business practise and is already raising questions of security.

Cybercriminals are always one step ahead in developing new ways to abuse the online community, and experts predict that cloud computing will be no different. However, well-established Hosting providers should be able to make assurances about their security policy and when implemented with due care, cloud-based technology can offer a wealth of benefits to the business world.

By Ali Raza,

This guest blog is written by Ali Raza on behalf of Ali is a very keen blogger and writes content to please the audience and to add value to their lives. In his free time, Ali likes to get things ticked off from his bucket list.

Interest In Private Cloud Area Shapes Up As The Market Matures

Interest In Private Cloud Area Shapes Up As The Market Matures

Interest in Private Cloud Area  Shapes Up as the Market Matures

As their market matures, many companies are contemplating about using a private cloud for their operation, keeping in mind the convenience, better security and control that they can exercise with their internal technology platforms. The use of a private cloud allows a company’s IT department to exercise more flexibility in terms of controlling the internal environment of their servers. However, there are some skeptical views regarding the use of private cloud by companies and whether it is indeed a viable technology that will deliver the results they expect from using the same in their business.Cloud-Store

Private cloud overview

A cloud storage service is a viable tool that companies can use in storing data in their system and making it accessible within their network. Using a private cloud storage will help companies to actively use the data that they need some degree of control from. The data is stored within an infrastructure in their data center which optimizes the company’s employees to access and exchange information with enhanced performance and security. This works like an in-house private cloud that is available within a company’s IT data system. A private cloud computing service is one that deploys an on-premises cloud service through a virtual data center within the company’s IT infrastructure that works with a self service portal.

Growing numbers of companies to use private cloud in the near future

According to surveys, there are a growing number of enterprises that want to use private cloud in the near future to optimize their business. The TechTarget survey revealed that there are different reasons why companies want to pursue private cloud in their operation, reasons among which include improving the company’s financial costs and enhancing the IT operation for their business. But the most obvious outcome of the survey showed that the number of companies looking forward to pursuing private cloud is growing.

The use of private cloud computing is certainly on the rise and there a number of reasons why this kind of technology is becoming popular in affecting the IT market these days. The main reason seen as reported in TechTarget for this growing popularity of private computing is the private cloud cost savings benefits. The technology is seen to unburden the IT systems and maintenance requirements which essentially helps a company to enjoy more productive profits owing to this cost saving effect on the IT workloads and software maintenance. IT managers find the use of a private cloud computing as viable for their computing services.

The survey revealed that small and large companies are more ready to use the private cloud computing system as compared to the medium sized companies because of the unique needs of these companies. Private cloud computing is more convenient in small businesses because they use modest resources of their IT system and using private cloud is a less traditional method that they could adapt to their system. Large companies are more concerned about the cost saving benefit of private cloud computing to offload some of their less critical workloads and projects that do not require stringent compliance on IT system.

Are companies ready to embrace private cloud?

Apparently, not all companies are not too well versed on what a private cloud computing system really is. There has been a misconception about running a virtualized environment for data management from using private cloud computing as described by the Vice President of the Cloud Technology Partners, John Treadway. Even the Chief Executive Officer of Logicworks, Ken Ziegler raised the issue on the common misconceptions regarding private cloud computing and about “cloudwashing” where vendors are selling their public cloud services as bundles of a private cloud package. If you own the data as your company asset but use the services of a third party vendor that is plugged to your own data center, then you are not using a private cloud at all. This can cost you more by using the services of another vendor. A private cloud system is one that should be available from your company’s in-house IT infrastructure and should not be connected in any way to another vendor’s IT server.

With the advent of the private cloud computing IT solution, more companies are getting a better perspective in understanding what a private cloud really means. Although private cloud computing is not something new in the IT industry, the whole system is not yet fully understood. Thus, it would suffice to say that this cloud computing is neither on its infancy nor in its maturity stage in affecting the fields of IT service management and engineering systems in corporate companies. But many companies are now getting ready to completely embrace the latest IT solution in the form of private cloud computing and with the growing need for using a private cloud, this type of computing system will likely become the future IT service management that companies will soon deploy in their business IT system.

By Stacy Carter,

Stacy Carter is a crazy amateur to cover technology news via online exposures. She writes about cloud computing, content marketing, various applications, Android and iPhone apps. She contributes for many websites.

Cloud Database Of 2013 – Trends And Predictions

Cloud Database Of 2013 – Trends And Predictions

Cloud Database of 2013 – Trends and Predictions

Pardon the pun, but the cloud has been on the horizon of tech heads for a number of years and is finally having its time in the sun. The advantages that it bestows on its users is clear for all to see and those who had the foresight to get involved with cloud computing when it was in its infancy are reaping the rewards for their vision. However, now that the cloud is on everyone’s lips, where to from here?cloud-prediction-database

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Power to the People

Whereas the average Joe has very little requirement for the scalability and more industry oriented advantages of the cloud, 2013 is going to see the cloud become a much larger part of people’s lives. The cloud has been limited thus far to corporate clients and those in the tech industry who realize how revolutionary the cloud really is – that is all about to change.

Many consumers don’t even realize that they have dealt with the cloud due to cloud based services such as iTunes, Gmail and Dropbox for example. And if the man in the street has even heard of the cloud, they would be hard pressed to be able to tell you anything about it. That is all about to change.

Internet providers are going to start providing free cloud storage for clients and once clients start using the cloud and see the benefits of global accessibility, unlimited storage that never fails, and security of data, the cloud will be as common to users as social media.

Parting of the Cloud

Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) which is dominated by Amazon and Rackspace are using IaaS as a launching pad to provide services from other, higher altitude layers of the cloud. Since other cloud offerings such as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), its relatively new associate – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) are much higher margin than IaaS, so this is the space the big players want to be and want their clients to be.

This trend will continue to evolve in 2013. The big question though is how quickly clients will move up the cloud layers. I anticipate it will be easier to get the clients to move up the cloud then what it was to get them on the cloud in the first place.

Databases on the Cloud

A new relational database developed for the cloud and with backward compatibility and support for SQL will start to gain traction. This concept is being worked on by a number of parties as a database that requires minimal administration and can be easily scaled in the cloud yet still is SQL-centric is a logical evolution. Of course there will be different offerings and it will take a while for a winner or winners to be crowned but this trend is ready to be unleashed.

2013 stands to be another interesting year for the cloud. Watching the cloud drift will definitely be more interesting than watching the grass grow.

By Sharon Robinson

Working on behalf of Somoto, visit us on the Somoto Website

Is Microsoft Winning The Public Cloud Wars?

Is Microsoft Winning The Public Cloud Wars?

Is Microsoft Winning The Public Cloud Wars?

I came across an interesting survey the other day that details public cloud usage from the folks at the Everest Group. Their report provides a really great snapshot on the state of cloud adoption – both public and private. After reading the report and reflecting on the data, it had me asking: Is Microsoft winning the public cloud war?

Now before you jump right to the comments section to tell me just how delusional or what a Microsoft homer I am, hear me out.

Private Cloud: The Real Winner

First, it should be pointed out that the Everest Group confirms what many others have observed. That users still prefer private clouds to public clouds – by roughly 2 to 1. So if we were judging who is leading the race to the cloud, it would have to be all those organizations that are transforming their static data centers into elastic and dynamic clouds.

Admittedly, as a story, that does not have the same appeal as watching someone get voted off the island.

Microsoft Poised to Win in Public Clouds?

The Everest study also looked at what public cloud service companies are using, which ones they are considering, which ones they are not considering and which ones they are aware of or following.

We all know you can measure momentum through a variety of different mechanisms – including market and mindshare. Market share provides a snapshot of who is winning today, and mindshare provides a measure of who is poised to grab the lead in the future. When I parse the data from the Everest Group report and compare use with awareness, I see two very different pictures.


The first chart demonstrates what everyone already knows, that the public cloud is dominated by Amazon Web Services (AWS).


The second graph shows awareness or the mindshare of each of the major public cloud services. This is the one that surprised me. It shows Microsoft leading the mindshare battle with 92% of those surveyed aware of Azure – versus 74% of the respondents claiming awareness of AWS, and less than half aware of Savvis cloud services.

So, what can we conclude from this? Is Microsoft losing the battle but winning the war? Is this ‘awareness gap’ a function of the millions of marketing and advertising dollars Microsoft is spending on Azure (versus the word of mouth viral marketing approach being employed by AWS)? Will the Azure mindshare translate into actual spending and market share gains from Azure in the coming years?

It’s this last question that, as a marketer, interests me the most.

A Quiet Revolution

Over the last decade there has been a revolution quietly occurring. Gone are days when new segment-defining products and services could only be launched with massive marketing and advertising budgets. For start-ups creating new markets, success is predicated on digital marketing initiatives, viral adoption and making it easy for people to consume and use your product. Those that follow these market segment-defining companies have to play a very different, and much more expensive, game.

That above everything else I suspect is what’s behind the ‘awareness gap’ seen in the Everest report. While AWS has been getting their product into the hands of people who, in turn, have used it to build new, innovative and interesting businesses (Zynga, Foursquare, Dropbox to name a few), Microsoft, has been playing the long game by focusing on its branding and advertising as a means to saturate the market and create an impression of inevitability.

And while Microsoft has not released numbers, they’ve left some clues that suggest the strategy is building some momentum.

And Now Back to Private Cloud

To bring the discussion full circle, the Everest Group survey found that 70% of responders want to run financial applications and ERP in a private cloud setting, 60% want their email and collaboration and 55% preferred their custom applications to run in private clouds.

So how do the public cloud wars factor into the mega trend of private cloud? From a marketing perspective, the question is what can public cloud providers do to tap into the massive movement toward private clouds? The answer is tied up in self-service.

The concept of self-service has been building over the last few years. We see it in our gas stations, in our grocery stores and now even in our IT. Increasingly organizations are enabling their employees to design, deploy and manage their own IT solutions. They are exposing them to the costs of those solutions and they are using self-service portals as the mechanism to facilitate those interactions.

Public cloud providers should see the explosion in self-service as an opportunity to tap into a captive and qualified market. Public cloud providers can leverage the wave in self-service and blur the line between public and private cloud services by exposing their infrastructure or software through private cloud management portals.

The benefits from a customer’s perspective are also particularly clear. Users get a one-stop shop where they can design, deploy, manage and pay for cloud services. Users can choose, based not on technology, but on characteristics like price, service levels, security and compliance capabilities, where they run their workloads.

In this way they develop a cloud strategy. For example, an organization may want to run their test and development workloads on low cost cloud providers, they may decide to run their non-secure production apps on a public provider who meets their service uptime requirements and they may decide to save their compliance and security-sensitive workloads for their private cloud. That is exactly the approach we are seeing more and more organizations beginning to take.

So whether it’s Amazon leading the market share race or Microsoft winning the mindshare battle, the ultimate winner in the public cloud wars will be the one who taps into this move to self-service clouds.

By John Humphreys, VP of Marketing at Egenera

humphreysPrior to joining Egenera, Humphreys was senior director, Data Center and Cloud Marketing at Citrix Systems. There he drove efforts around virtualization and cloud and had responsibility for developing marketing strategy, defining packaging and pricing, leading program execution, driving customer engagements and pre-sales activity, and acting as a primary spokesperson. Prior to Citrix, Humphreys founded and was vice president of the virtualization practice at IDC, a global information technology research firm.

Cloud Infographic: The Content Cloud

Cloud Infographic: The Content Cloud

Cloud Infographic: The Content Cloud

The ever expanding internet data coupled with social and mobile infrastructure expansion has made big data analytics a buzz word, especially looking at the fact that ninety percent of the world’s internet data is created in the last couple of years… Read More

Included is an attractive infographic courtesy of Olswang which delves a little further into the nature of big data content, and the cloud…


Infographic Source: Olswang 

Interview:The 8KMiles Acquisition Of FuGen Solutions

Interview: The 8KMiles Acquisition Of FuGen Solutions

8K Miles recently acquired FuGen solutions for $7.5 Million. The move signifies 8K Miles focus and interest in expanding into the Cloud IAM (Identity Access Management) and Identity federation brokerage services. What’s evident from the acquisition is the rising demand for simplified identity and access management on the Cloud, especially in hybrid cloud deployment scenarios. I interviewed Suresh Venkatachari, who is the Chairman and CEO of 8K Miles about the Cloud landscape and also about the acquisition.

Q. Tell us a bit about yourself and 8KMiles and its acquisition of FuGen?

I have an engineering background and bring over 24 years of management experience in the software product and consulting industry to 8KMiles. In the last 14 years I’ve had a strong entrepreneurial focus and founded 4 companies—successfully taking one public while selling two others. Prior to this, I headed the electronic banking software development at Deutsche Bank, Singapore.

8KMiles is a leading global, end-to-end cloud solutions provider and Amazon Web Services Premier Consulting Partner. The company is focused on delivering value-added cloud solutions designed to provide enterprise-level cloud security, mobile collaboration and large-scale data analytics for enterprise, SMBs, government and managed service providers.

8KMiles has deep expertise in secure cloud solutions, meeting important security qualifications such as FISMA in verticals such as government and more. The acquisition of FuGen Solutions will further enhance 8KMiles’ security services platform in the cloud, while offering innovative, complementary security measures such as Identity and Access Management to help streamline authentication across multiple cloud-based business systems. By incorporating and expanding on FuGen’s intellectual property for its enterprise Cloud Identity Broker, 8KMiles will be better poised to meet the growing security and compliance needs of large enterprises and government agencies.

Q. Describe how 8KMiles is adding value to the Cloud eco-system?

We recently received the honor of being selected as an Amazon Web Services Premier Consulting Partner, a designation given to only 15 cloud integrators in the industry. We’re very proud of this.

We have over five years of experience in building cloud solutions. Our team of cloud experts and enterprise-level cloud architecture is robust yet tailored in its approach to help companies power their cloud and go-to-market strategies, while achieving greater cloud computing savings and efficiencies. Our customers benefit greatly from our enhanced security services offered through our cloud platform, while being able to take advantage of more innovative, complementary security measures such as Identity and Access Management to help them better manage and streamline authentication as they increasingly migrate other business systems into the cloud. We pride ourselves in being able to help large enterprises and government agencies to meet growing security and compliance needs.

Q. In simple terms, how do you describe Federated Identity Management on the Cloud?

User identities authenticated by an authentication provider or identity provider other than a company’s identity management system, are said to be federated.

If an identity management system is hosted on the Cloud, identities are said to be managed using Federated Identity Management on the Cloud.

•If enterprise users can reuse their existing corporate credentials to access SaaS applications in the cloud without signing in again, then those users are also considered federated.

Government or Large Enterprises can also rely on a cloud identity broker or gateway as the federated identity management in the cloud to allow users to seamlessly access other cloud applications with their own credentials (BYOD) or with multiple types of credentials at different assurance levels.

Q. Do you see increased adoption of SSO within the enterprise Cloud space in near future?

Yes. Enterprise users will access an increasing number of resources or SaaS applications hosted on the Cloud (public, private or hybrid) and prefer using their credentials once to login, which would be the primary motivation for SSO adoption on the Cloud. On the consumer side, Financial, Ecommerce and Insurance applications, and Government Online Citizen services will see an uptake in adoption of federated access and streamlined authentication across sites.

Q. Tell us about the on-going pilot program of FuGen with some of the Fortune 500 companies?

In FuGen’s SaaS Onboarding and Certification for CA’s Cloud SSO Readiness Program, FuGen’s has onboarded and certified 50 plus SaaS partners of CA from a private cloud environment, helping many Fortune500 customers of CA to integrate with various cloud applications.

Q. Hybrid cloud deployments and federated SSO – perfect match?

Hybrid cloud deployments for enterprises usually have federated identities with or without SSO enabled. SSO enablement is usually preferred functionality for ease of access for users. Federated SSO reduces the complexity of handling password management related issues by providing improved convenience for enterprise users with streamlined authentication for Hybrid cloud deployments.

Q. How does FuGen’s IAM and SSO solutions address security concerns?

FuGen’s IAM solution precludes access to external resources or cloud applications for unauthenticated and unauthorized users. FuGen’s IAM solution with SSO prompts for re- authentication credentials if credentials are revoked or if access mechanisms are compromised. Specifically, FuGen’s cloud identity broker helps to address the following:

• Rapidly onboard and operationally certify SSO partners or cloud applications in real-time for federation compliance and security requirements

• Reduces the SSO and cross domain IAM deployment risks with respect to security, compliance and auditing

• Provide continuous monitoring and reporting capabilities for Federated IDM and SSO

• Minimizes the SSO partner friction and setup time

• Helps big enterprises to manage identity access for SMB partners and minimizes the weakest link problem

• Helps to manage Relying Parties federation policies and ensure compliance with Authentication providers

• Ensures the establishment of federated IAM trust framework from the start

• Continuous or ongoing management of federated connections for achieving the best Federation QoS (Quality of Service) for large deployments

By Salman Ul Haq

Disclaimer: This interview was conducted by Salman Ul Haq on behalf of CloudTweaks.

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Cloud technologies are known to offer many benefits, but it’s safe to say that two words dominate expectations when it comes to development cycles: faster and nimbler. As more organizations implement agile development, it’s becoming clear that expedited time to market is an expected standard – and so is the speedy development that goes along with it.

As fast turnarounds and flexible production become a baseline of cloud development, so does the necessity for developers to fix, tweak, change and adapt as they go. On a sprint, it’s tempting to prioritize speed over completion, especially when a deadline for an impatient client is drawing closer. As a result, some developers are tempted to rush and cut corners in an effort to meet the delivery deadlines. Because of this, many in our field are becoming familiar with the term “technical debt.”

The danger, of course, is that even though those shortcuts can seem like an efficient way to achieve speed to market, they can damage teams in other ways. For instance, last year when LinkedIn suffered a hack and millions of email addresses were stolen, the company was harshly accused of cutting corners, which led to the vulnerability. Whether they did or did not is still debatable, however the cost to the brand and revenue were apparent from the mere idea that the company scrimped when it came to coding.

Every organization that’s using agile should be well aware that sometimes cutting corners can turn into technical debt that will cost your organization later – and can ultimately cause deadlines to be missed, sabotaging the same cycle time you were trying to protect.

Managing technical debt

Many developers make the mistake of thinking they know what corners they can cut without sacrificing quality. But as development evolves and uncompleted changes and abandoned directions pile up, the team can find themselves staring at a serious technical debt that must be paid.

The causes of debt are fairly common. The pressure to release a product prematurely, a lack of collaboration and knowledge-sharing, or a lack of thoughtful testing or code review and key documentation, are just a few dynamics that can lead to a significant amount of debt. So how do you keep this from happening to your team?

One tip to keep in mind is resolving issues as soon as they appear instead of putting them on a back burner. The earlier the stage of detection, the less expensive those issues will be to fix. Issues left unresolved, on the other hand, will expand into a technical debt that will eventually demand more time and money in eliminating. As one example, consider legacy code where the software engineers spend so much effort in keeping the system running, thereby supporting the debt that there’s not enough time to add new features to the product without additional expense.


Common shortcuts – and their costs

When work cycles are on the line, developers tend to cut some of the same corners over and over. A good example is Quality Assurance work, such as code reviews, unit testing, integration tests and system tests. Many developers feel comfortable skipping tasks here for one simple reason. Because this is work undertaken to validate the code, rather than actually writing the code (other than corrections found by the QA activities), they assume it can be eliminated with minimal risk.

The truth is that cutting corners here can mean sacrificing knowledge and productivity. While it might not be immediately apparent, the overall productivity of the team tends to be higher during a lot of these activities since they increase interactive learning within the team, which in turn leads to higher levels of output.

One way to protect this valuable phase is to implement processes that are used as a check list among every development cycle. In my company, we call this Tiempo Quality System (TQS), a defined set of best practices and processes that standardizes the engineering process. By using a configurator that ensures best practice QA activities are defined up front, TQS minimizes overhead while maximizing overall team productivity. Similar systems can easily be implemented among any development team and are a great way to eliminate technical debt.

Managing quick cycles without cutting corners

All of this might sound as if agile developers need to choose between delivering on fast-paced cycles or executing on solid development. Rest assured, both are possible.

One solution is tracking velocity to produce data that shows the production delays resulting from a backlog of coding issues. By demonstrating the exact fault lines that jeopardize product quality, developers can head off debt at the start. Things like Code Reviews should be looked at not merely as QA activities, but as opportunities for the team to learn together, create improvements on producing the code and work towards optimization.

The shortcuts worth taking

Developers must accept that the pressure to cut corners will never go away. So is it taking a shortcut ever acceptable? Under some circumstances, yes. One category that qualifies would be issues that aren’t showstoppers when working on release or deadline driven products. In this situation, rather than delaying time to market, refactoring can and should be implemented after meeting the deadline.

Predictable release schedules, deadline adherence, and expedited development cycles are good things and should always be prioritized in intelligent cloud development. At the same time, it’s critical to adopt a long view and not sacrifice quality in the pursuit of speed. Manage your technical debt during development and you’ll find it that much easier to deliver a high-performing product – on deadline.

By Bruce Steele

Bruce Steele is the COO of Tiempo Development. He drives Tiempo’s software engineering, professional services, consulting and customer support initiatives. Mr. Steele is a seasoned executive with over 25 years of management experience in the areas of operations, corporate development, sales and strategic planning with leading technology firms. He can be reached at

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A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

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Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

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Key Takeaways From Dyn’s DDoS Attack

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The DDoS Attack That Shook The World

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Achieving Network Security In The IoT

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Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

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Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

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What You Need To Know About Choosing A Cloud Service Provider

What You Need To Know About Choosing A Cloud Service Provider

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Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

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Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

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Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

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Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…


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