Author Archives: CloudTweaks

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

The initial promise of cloud generated a lot of excitement particularly in the test and development worlds. It was easy to use and just as easy to dismiss. Although that gave way to disappointment as early adopters discovered most if not all of the familiar old problems around administration, networks and performance applied to the cloud as much as dedicated. With most first generation cloud platforms adopting iSCI-based storage platforms, performance particularly stood out as an issue, and it became accepted opinion that cloud could never outpace dedicated equipment. Is that still the case? A third party benchmark test on seven leading cloud platforms using a dedicated server sheds some interesting light on the discussion

As cloud moves from being a bleeding edge technology to a more common place service tool, it’s still common to find IT professionals assuming that cloud performance simply cannot match up to that of dedicated hardware. Early experiences with cloud platforms have left many with sub-optimal experiences, and there is a widespread view in the market that high IOPS applications are best left in-house.

Are your four cores the same as mine?

To understand the origins of this belief, remember that the cloud was created as a tool for testing and development. As its adoption spread, and excitement over its potential grew, developers and then businesses put more and more demands on their cloud environments.

This led to a natural, if not unfortunate, dynamic at the commodity end of the market. With a focus on expanding profit margins and controlling expenditures, many businesses decided to trim costs around the biggest single expense of a cloud platform — the back end. The short-sighted decision to save money by using cheap storage systems led predictably to subpar performance – which in turn led to some of the more publicized outages in recent years.

Another factor is a lack of standardization. A recent study that benchmarked the performance of major players in the IaaS space discovered a wide variance in specifications. For example, with a common instance type of 4 cores/16GB, the variance between one provider and another can be as much as 50 percent. This means some specifications can be misleading to the point of being meaningless. If one platform performs at only 50 percent rate of its neighbor, then twice as many resources must be provisioned.

In another example of unreliability, commodity cloud players with iSCI in the back end have an ethernet hop in their infrastructure that inevitably slows down performance. As a result, applications that require high IOPS don’t function smoothly on those platforms. This results in the classic trade-off of price versus performance.

All of which means, that potential buyers must do thorough research on cloud platforms to understand what they will actually deliver. A detailed analysis of a platform’s technologies is essential before making a sizeable investment. It’s a pity that so few cloud providers share the details of their infrastructure with end users, or allow them to audit their platforms. While commercial secrets may be kept and embarrassing details hid, it means that IT providers have to use the rumor mill to make decisions about where they host their applications.

You get what you pay for

Given the background of some cloud performance issues, some IT pros might be surprised to hear that cloud platforms can outperform dedicated servers. But they can – and there’s even third party data proving that shared technologies can compete with and even outclass dedicated hardware. The platforms simply have to be built with performance in mind and managed correctly.  Of course its still true that with several platforms, if performance is an issue, using dedicated can be the better option. But why don’t all cloud providers offer competitive performance?

The answer is roadblocks. The two most common obstacles work in tandem — expense and the relentless race to the bottom. When providers like Amazon and Google  prioritize offering low-cost services, they must cut costs elsewhere to enable those offerings – and those cuts often mean a failure to invest in the proven technologies needed to provide high performance. As a result, users eager to find an economical platform will often experience weak performance.

To “re-brand” cloud environments as reliable, speedy and secure, providers must invest the capital necessary to build an optimal, high-quality platform. Only then will they deliver the performance their customers deserve. This puts cloud providers who have already built out low cost storage in a bind. Should they rip out their existing infrastructure and replace what they have with high-end technologies such as fibre channel? The disruption is prohibitive and the cost would surely have to be passed onto the user. When a customer can leave with little or no notice, it would risk the business. So it is unlikely that we will see a wholesale rebuild of a platform any time soon.

Is it game over for dedicated?

Inevitably there will be applications that do not run well in the cloud. For instance, some proprietary big data applications more or less have to be run on dedicated servers. Customers like to stick with habits and suppliers too, which will keep dedicated around for some time. Look at how many mainframes are still deployed. But for the most part, the choice is obvious. Just take a look at the latest round of financial results from hosting providers. The numbers paint a picture of a flat or barely growing dedicated hosting customer base and revenues. Meanwhile cloud revenues and momentum grow inexorably.

By Daniel Beazer

Daniel Beazer has an extensive history of research and strategy with hosting and cloud organizations.  As director of strategy at FireHost, Daniel Beazer oversees interactions with enterprise and strategic customers. In this role, he identifies pain points that are unique to high-level customers and utilises his significant knowledge of cloud computing and hosting to help them. 

Seven Hidden Truths About Personal Clouds

Seven Hidden Truths About Personal Clouds

Seven Hidden Truths About Personal Clouds 

Increasingly, people are discovering the joy of using personal clouds for a wide range of tasks, such as photo and video sharing, mobile backup, anytime music and project collaboration. Consequently as their popularity increases, people’s skepticism about worrisome aspects, such as privacy, security and reliability, is starting to ebb and growing desire and expectation for anytime access of personal content is trumping concerns.

This article highlights some key potential gotchas that personal cloud providers prefer users don’t know, but, being aware of these is essential as it helps adopters gain the most from personal clouds while avoiding potential pitfalls.

#1: The service is free (except when it isn’t). Every personal cloud service offers free sign up, but the catch is the ‘freemium’ model that relies on users upgrading to a paid service or mining user data for advertising. So even though a service appears free, there is no such thing as a free cloud.

#2: We don’t care about your data (we want your $). Although personal clouds tout their many benefits, they are really offered to sell people things such as more storage, devices, mobile data and content. Or they are offered to reduce switching because your data is in their cloud. This is a modern version of the strategy of giving the razor away for free in order to sell the blades i.e. the aforementioned stuff. Don’t be fooled, keep a close tab on your wallet.

#3: Trust us, your data is safe & secure (unless it isn’t). A personal cloud service accessible by the public has a good chance of being hacked, even with stringent safeguards. Law enforcement and intelligence agencies can legally search cloud information, depending on location and circumstance. You should still not put anything online that you don’t want Uncle Sam or other unknown relatives to access.

#4: We are 100% reliable (except when we’re not). There have been numerous outages and incidents affecting personal clouds, resulting in data loss, despite best efforts to avoid this. It is too costly to 100% guarantee that all data will be available forever. The chances may be slim that you will lose data sometime, but if you really want to be careful, maintain an off-cloud version of important stuff. It’s like dentists say, you don’t need to floss all your teeth, only the ones you want to keep.

#5: Get a lot of storage for cheap (that you probably won’t use). Most personal clouds offer a nominal amount of free storage and a lot more storage for a modest fee. How do they do this without going broke? Is it economies of scale, storing data on low cost media, compression or storing a single copy of commercial content such as movies and songs? The answer is yes , but it’s also a numbers game. Services are based on the premise that a high percentage of purchased storage is never used. When you run out of free storage and upgrade for more, it takes time to fill it up, which for most people, never occurs, for many reasons. When this happens, you are actually paying for free storage for other people.

#6: Having a bad cloud day? (Good luck getting help). How many personal cloud services offer phone support? OK, stop laughing. If zero popped into mind, that would be about right. Many services offer online support, which may be ok for techies. If you are non-technical, you should befriend a techie or there is safety in numbers i.e. stick to popular services because if millions use something, it must work.

#7: We’re not mining your data (but we might tomorrow). Popular personal cloud services are legit, with privacy policies that prevent data from being mined without consent. That’s fine until they change. They can publish a revised policy with fine print that may relax privacy restrictions. How many people read the fine print? About the same as the number of providers offering phone support. So while, you enjoy the convenience of your personal cloud, treat confidential data with utmost care, by keeping it off-cloud.

In sum, these seven hidden truths may cause you to pause before using personal clouds. That wasn’t the intent of this article; it was to make people aware, so they know how far they can rely on personal clouds. As a final word of advice, personal clouds are here to stay; it’s best to make them your ally, which you can do by being aware of potential gotchas.

By Hal Steger,

hal-imageHal Steger is Vice President of Worldwide Marketing and Business Development at Funambol. He has more than 20 years of marketing and business development experience. Steger co-founded and was VP Marketing of Rubric, where he positioned the company as the leader of the new category of Marketing Automation solutions. Rubric was acquired for $370M. Prior to Rubric, Hal held product management and product marketing positions at Oracle, Uniface/Compuware, and other high profile Silicon Valley companies. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan with a double major in Computer Science and Economics, and an M.S.I.A. (MBA) degree from Carnegie-Mellon’s Tepper School of Business (formerly GSIA).

Hybrid Cloud Is The Way Forward

Hybrid Cloud is the Way Forward

No one in the industry likes vendor lock-in but it is something which every enterprise has to live with, in fact, this is how the enterprise software and solutions market was originally designed to work. One of the promises of the Cloud was to break this vicious cycle of locking in with a vendor but with a plethora of Cloud offerings and service delivery models – SaaS, PaaS, IaaS etc. – and dearth of standards, there’s an acute need to federate the way in which different Cloud services talk to each other and learn to live within the same space.

Recent surveys have shown that enterprise – big and small – which have made their transition to the Cloud find it more appealing to maintain a portfolio of Cloud services from varied vendors instead of tying up with a single vendor. One reason of this trend may be the lack of turn-key solutions when it comes to SaaS offerings. For example, somewhere in the stack of a Cloud based ERP solution, you will find Amazon’s EC2 being utilized for compute but this is not the example of a hybrid Cloud deployment.

In comparison to the complexities of integrating multiple legacy and even some recent non-Cloud enterprise systems, integrating Cloud services from multiple vendors and public/private Cloud offerings to create the architecture right for your enterprise is not a nightmare, so to speak. However, the lack of standards in this space will only create diversions and roadblocks for new entrants to deal with.

Compatibility will be the key to increased Cloud adoption and further penetration into the enterprise. One possible route to achieve Cloud compatibility across the board is the Open route, which consists of five O’s

  • Open Source
  • Open Data
  • Open Cloud
  • Open APIs
  • Open Standards

Open Source is already very mature and has been a driving force for much of the enterprise software landscape however, open APIs and open data are two aspects which are still evolving. Open cloud, on the other hand, is key to delivering on the real value of the Cloud – ability to deliver service, anytime, anywhere, through any cloud.

Keeping in view the demand for bringing together and tying up different Cloud services and vendors into one coherent enterprise solution, there are now solutions which offer to remove the pain of data and application migration to the Cloud and then interaction between various Cloud services in a unified deployment scenario – hybrid cloud.

Perhaps one of the selling points for hybrid cloud is the mitigation, if not elimination, of risk. Business continuity and growth demands that sensitive and even non-sensitive business data be secured and when CIOs talk about migrating to the Cloud, one of the primary concerns is often cited as data security. With hybrid cloud deployments, the risk of data security can be isolated from the mix and addressed more effectively, resulting in improved confidence of the stakeholders.

By Salman UI Haq

Mobile Devices & BYOD – Bring Your Own Desktop?

Mobile Devices & BYOD – Bring Your Own Desktop?

Mobile Devices & BYOD – Bring Your Own Desktop?

The plethora of mobile devices with smartphones and tablets leading the wave of a new era of computing, CIOs and IT managers wake up to a nightmare i.e. mobile management. Mobile management spans both, the platform or the mobile devices and content which in the case of enterprises would be sensitive business data which an employee accesses and perhaps stores on the mobile device.

PC sales are in slump while mobile devices have made their inroads, landing right into the hands of consumers around the globe and then strategically seeping into the enterprise. This has left CIOs scrambling to grasp the reality of the modern enterprise where mobile will eventually become the centerpiece in IT – not dedicated workstations, PCs or laptops.

Cloud’s deep penetration into the enterprise is a reality, serving enterprise applications directly from the Cloud has become a reality, delivering on the promises of increased productivity and cost reductions in IT operations. One of the primary implications of this paradigm shift has been the separation of “dedicated PC/laptop” from enterprise application/s of the enterprise employee. This would mean that organizations would no longer be able to have tighter controls on what devices they allow at workplace, probably due to popular demand and the fact that employees will, in any case bring their own mobile devices to work.

Desktop on the Cloud

Beyond these “enterprise applications”, there’s a shift of the whole workstation to the Cloud. With advances in desktop virtualization, there are now a range of new services and startups focusing on providing desktop virtualization solutions to consumer as well as enterprise users. From the perspective of an IT manager, serving the desktop through the Cloud to any mobile device which has a “thin client” app installed is a better position to be in, compared to apps, for example, CRM being accessed from a personal mobile device. When you serve the desktop through the Cloud, you give access to the processing power and a familiar (PC) experience to the users, not to mention the support for not-so-old (I’m not saying ‘legacy’ just yet) enterprise applications. Perhaps, cloud desktop could help transition to true mobile – enterprise applications served through the Cloud with frameworks and policies in place for data security.

Mobile Management –Device and Data

Mobile management spans both data and device and combines, it presents a formidable challenge, one which the industry has yet to respond to and with the market for enterprise mobile applications expected to grow to a $55BB market by 2016, the demand for managing the devices and the data they feed on will only surge. In terms of ensuring safe and secure access and usage of data living on the mobile devices, there will never be one-solution-fits-all option.

Mobile Management, Increased Productivity and Cost Reduction

The notion that the entire or significant part of the enterprise workplace going mobile, IT infrastructure costs will naturally decline may be true but only when you look at one side of the equation. When you factor in the increase in mobile management costs for example, the story of cost reductions does not hold true. This is evident in a survey by ComputerWorld which concluded that in 2011, there were 2.9 IT workers per 1,000 mobile devices. Last year this grew to 3.6 and this year, an estimated 4 dedicated IT workers will be needed for every 1,000 mobile devices. This reflects the growing need to manage mobile, both devices and data.

This post is brought to you by the Mobile Enterprise 360 Community and Citrix

By Robert Smith

BYOD And The Issues Surrounding Cloud Storage

BYOD And The Issues Surrounding Cloud Storage

BYOD And The Issues Surrounding Cloud Storage

As BYOD increases and employees increasingly use personal laptops, smartphones and mobile devices for work purposes, concerns over data security and data privacy remain the most significant barriers to cloud adoption, according to the latest research from the Cloud Industry Forum (CIF). Corporate IT managers and CIOs are rightfully correct in their trepidation as they open their networks to  and data leakage plus lose control over data once it leaves the corporate confines. While employees benefit from the ability to work from anywhere by using the cloud services that provide BYOD support, they also risk the loss of privacy when they inadvertently open access to personal files. This potential loss of privacy is worrisome. byod-image

CIF’s June 2012 research found that 66 percent of respondents said the most significant concern about the adoption of cloud services within the business was data security; this is up from 62 percent in 2011. The issue of data privacy also saw a leap up from 55 percent in 2011 to 66 percent in 2012.

The problem however is not BYOD, but the cloud storage. Using file storage providers such as Dropbox or Google Drive offers convenience and simplicity that may not be available with corporate applications. These services fall into category of Shadow-IT—the case in which users decide that they need a service, one which the IT department will not, or cannot provide to them in a timely manner. In other words, the hardware or software adopted “lives in the shadows” as opposed to being sanctioned and supported by the CIO and corporate IT departments. In the past Shadow IT included smartphones, portable USB drives and tablet computers on the hardware side and applications such as Gmail, instant messaging services and Skype. Shadow-IT now encompasses cloud storage as well. Where data is stored and how securely within these applications, however, cannot always be verified. What is known is that once out of the enterprise IT environment, it becomes impossible for CIOs to know where company data is, or who has access to it. In fact when one signs up for these cloud storage services, one is also giving the service permission to use one’s data (users are advised to check the terms and conditions fine print).

The challenge for cloud providers will be convincing customers that the risks of the cloud do not outweigh the benefits – and those risks include the exposure of data through security incidents. The March 2013 Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) cyber-attacks on Spamhaus flooded Spamhaus servers blocking traffic and making the servers unreachable. For users storing files in services that use Spamhaus networks, their files were slow to access or in some cases, inaccessible. Other potential threats to documents stored in clouds include caching of information on mobile devices, and stored passwords. Companies may also risk issues with compliance with HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996), HCFA (Health Care Financing Administration), FISMA (Federal Information Security Management Act) and SOX (Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002).

When IT departments choose cloud services to enable BYOD support, they are quite right to consider security and compliance as well as issues such as price and convenience. The CIF research also found that security concerns had risen in 2012 most noticeably in the private sector, increasing from 59 percent to 67 percent. Conversely, in the public sector concern had narrowly dropped from 69 percent to 66 percent. Both the private and public sector have experienced data attacks and the European Union (EU) have called on both corporations and governments to be more transparent when they suffer data breaches.

In sum, it behooves both cloud storage providers and corporate IT decision makers to focus on security. The clouds have a responsibility to users to protect the data stored from attack and to protect the privacy of documents stored. Moreover, IT departments must acknowledge the growing use of clouds that are brought in by users and realize that the department is never going to be able to compete with the simplicity and ease of use of clouds Consequently, IT must change its own worldview and figure out how to implement needed protection and guidelines to assure the security of data once it leaves the corporate network for the cloud. Such paradigm shifts will not be an easy process for many organizations. The trick will be to have both sticks and carrots—firm and enforceable data control policies and a never-ending search for the best cloud storage to meet changing demands.

By Simon Bain,

Simon Bain is the company founder, CTO and chief architect of Simplexo Ltd’s software solutions.

Keeping Your Data Safe

Keeping Your Data Safe

Keeping Your Data Safe

Cloud storage has revolutionized the way we keep our files and because most of the established cloud storage providers use the best security and encryption technology available, most of us tend to forget that we have our own part to do in ensuring the safety of our own files. While cloud storage can free us from such worries as having malicious programs sneak into our computer system, there are still practices that we have to observe to keep our data safe in the cloud. If you’re already taking advantage of online storage or plan to move your digital luggage online, here are some tips that can help prevent data loss and unauthorized access to your files.

Use a Unique Password for Your Cloud Storage Account

You may have already read this before but here it is anyway: use a different username and password for each and every site and online service that you use. Again, we reiterate the importance of using a unique username and password for your cloud storage account. Choose a unique password that’s difficult to guess and preferably, consists of a combination of letters and numbers. Doing so can help prevent unauthorized access of your account in case your credentials on other sites and web services get compromised.

Do not Use Easy to Guess Answers to Security Questions

Most cloud storage providers give you a layer of protection in case you accidentally forget your login details. This often comes in the form of security questions. Scammers and hackers, however, can easily bypass this security check if you use answers that are found online. Hackers, for instance, can easily guess your mother’s maiden name by checking your online profile. The smart way to go about this is to answer security questions with fictional answers. If the security question is where you were born, you can answer with a nonexistent “hotel 358”. Do not Share Your Credentials with Anyone

You may be observing best practices to protect your data in the cloud but if you entrust your credentials to someone who does not know anything about safe computing and internet browsing, you may put your data at risk. Avoid sharing your cloud service account username and password with anyone. If you have reason to believe that your account information is compromised, change your login details as soon as possible. You may also contact your cloud vendor’s business phone number to ask them for help and let them know that something is amiss.

Encrypt Your Data

As much as possible, encrypt your data before uploading them online. This can help protect your files in case somebody manages to get your login details. There is a number of encryption software such as Truecrypt that you can use to ensure that only authorized people get to view you online files. File compression programs also give you the ability to password-protect your zipped folders.

Backup Your Files

To protect your data from loss in case your cloud storage provider gets hacked or closes down, it is best to have backups of your data on a physical drive. This may sound ironic because most users use the cloud to back up their files and get rid of physical drives. Just think of it this way: your personal copy may come handy in case you lose your data online. Never, ever keep just one copy of your files.

Use Security Software

You may compromise your cloud data’s security if your own computer system has security issues. Password sniffing malware, for example, may allow hackers to get your cloud account credentials and put your data at risk. Always keep your computer clean and free from viruses and malware by using reliable and updated antivirus software.

By Michelle Simplson

Michelle is a full-time professional editor that focuses on online writing services, specialized in the field of technology like RingCentral cloud phone, business and current trends in the industry.

The Reality Of Government Intrusion Risks For Cloud Businesses

The Reality of Government Intrusion Risks for Cloud Businesses

The concerns around government intrusion in cloud stored data, especially to reveal user sensitive information are amongst the most discussed topics within the cloud community. Although the concerns are often exaggerated, there is some truth in these concerns and sooner or later a cloud service provider may receive request from government authorities to reveal information or processes that are considered private and sometimes regarded as secrets, both in personal and organizational capacities. A more serious issue is that of unwarranted snooping into data residing in cloud and several incidents of data breach from both government and private authorities are in fact unlawful.

After the passage of Patriot Act, security agencies have issued several thousand NSLs (National Security Letters) to companies such as Microsoft, Google and Amazon etc. to obtain information and private data of hundreds of users without their knowledge or consent. Some other laws, such the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) applies directly to foreign nationals who have stored data in servers or cloud services residing in the U.S. and the law allows the Government to have unrestricted access to their data. The agencies have also deployed specialized infrastructure to eavesdrop on network traffic in order to obtain intelligence rendering most unprotected data vulnerable to leakage, even with the knowledge of service provider.

Hence data privacy breach from Government is a unique case of data protection which requires special measures to protect user privacy. After all, the adaptability of a cloud service by users will rely upon their confidence in the service provider for protecting their data to the same level as they would obtain for in-house storage. In fact, many users are reluctant to use cloud services because of the security breach concerns and the threat of losing control over the data. Additionally, some cautious administrators believe that if the government can spy on their data, so can criminals, making it crucial to add protection layers.  Hence, it is important to make any intercepted data useless for hackers and robust data monitoring and threat detection techniques are needed to be deployed as part of an effective security framework.

Primarily, all data should be encrypted before it leaves client premises and the encryption keys must be maintained in a separate server, ideally placed in-house. A similar technique is employed by Dropbox and Google Drive services which help them secure data against network intrusions. For those requiring extra security, a local service can be used on top of cloud service application that can encrypt and maintain keys locally using cryptographic algorithms such as AES and SHA. Some software already provides such functionality such as gKrypt and SafeMonk that can ensure users against intrusion from service providers or unwarranted government involvement. However new security architectures may be required that balances information security without compromising legitimate access by government to detect malicious information.

By Salam UI Haq

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Adopting A Cohesive GRC Mindset For Cloud Security

Adopting A Cohesive GRC Mindset For Cloud Security

Cloud Security Mindset Businesses are becoming wise to the compelling benefits of cloud computing. When adopting cloud, they need a high level of confidence in how it will be risk-managed and controlled, to preserve the security of their information and integrity of their operations. Cloud implementation is sometimes built up over time in a business,…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…


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