Author Archives: CloudTweaks

Weird Assumptions About Cloud Computing And How To Solve Them

Weird Assumptions About Cloud Computing And How To Solve Them

Cloud computing is a dynamic field. It’s been incorporated and used by many people, companies, non-profit organizations, and so many more. The technology, which allows you to use other people’s applications, is still growing. There have been so many useful things associated with it. Some are good and some bad. Cloud computing, however, remains a progressive tech sphere in 2012.

One interesting thing, and in a way weird about cloud computing, is the association it has with weather. Somehow, people still imagine cloud computing has something to do with the weather. According to a recent survey carried out by Wakefield Research and commissioned by Citrix, 51 percent of non-tech people think cloud computing is related to the weather.

For other people surveyed, cloud computing is associated with smaller things. Drugs and toilet paper were the answers some of the respondents gave when asked what they know about the cloud and its services. A question that one would beg to answer is why the public has so little information about cloud computing, or rather, is it a question of lack of interest in the subject matter? Here are some of the arguments that explain why in 2012 so many people have no idea what cloud computing is.

The first, most obvious reason not so many people understand cloud computing is their lack of knowledge. People are not interested in asking questions about the technology they use. You could blame this on the present education systems around the world, but there is a possibility that people just don’t care about what it is they use.

Another reason why people fail to understand cloud computing is because of the thin information available in the sphere. More commonly, the information provided by the content vendors is either too vague or too technical for the regular person. This means that people rely on television, newspapers, and magazines to find out about cloud computing. Knowing that only hot topics become news stories, and that sometimes these are inaccurate reports, it justifies why people may get a wrong picture about the cloud.

People also have lots of misconceptions about cloud computing because the general slow uptake of the technology by corporations. Compared to technologies like social media that have been embraced rather fast, cloud computing uptake has not been viral. There is a relatively slow uptake of cloud computing because of the traditions that have characterized most corporations. This means that very few people are aware of the interactions, even if they use it.

Overall, there is no single direction you can use to explain why cloud computing is confusing. However, what is needed is more interaction, training, public campaigns, and publishing on the same to get the information out of the door. This will tremendously boost its popularity and skew the knowledge graph.

By Walter Bailey

Mobile Cloud Computing Future

Mobile Cloud Computing Future 

When industry pundits forecast in 2006 that the usage need of data would surpass that of the voice market, not many could not conceptualize such a market outlook. Five years later and the ratio would pitch data market at nearly 70% of the mobile market and growing. The mobile technology has witnessed tremendous advances in recent years such that experts have reckoned that mobile cloud will colligate cloud computing in the next few years.

Mobile cloud computing is set to impact and transform the mobile communication landscape and the whole computing infrastructure. This means that cloud computing services, whether at home or at the work place, is getting more accessible and more utilized. So what more does the future hold for mobile cloud computing?

Mobile cloud-enabled and cloud-based services will inevitably rise to new heights as it is evidenced by recent market surveys. In a world where hundreds of thousands of mobile apps are churned out daily, cloud computing services have formed an integral part of many third-party app developers. A survey (Q2 2012) by Appcelerator showed a fascinating trend whereby 84% of the respondents (third-party developers) reported to using a cloud enabled or cloud based services in their daily applications. Companies are betting big on this trend e.g Microsoft has come up with a Microsoft Windows Phone Mango, a cloud platform integration on mobile devices. Some of these mobile applications are available for free while others are purchased and others are just links that will work in any or compatible browsers. In translation, all this could mean applications access that comes in more than one format but they will use the cloud to store and process your data and services respectively, all remotely from the cloud as opposed to your device.

There is a trend dubbed the BYOD (bring your own device) that is being embraced universally by organizations and businesses. This can be attributed to the entry of powerful portable devices like IPads, Tablets and Smart Phones and complemented by cloud computing. Cisco in a recent study reported that more than 90% of organizations supported the use of these portable devices and more and more of these mobiles will depend on the cloud. According to the CTO at Cisco, Padmasree Warrior, this trend is beneficial and will continue to grow because it is essential in improving productivity by enabling employees to work from anywhere at anytime.

What is influencing the inevitable mobile computing upsurge? For starters, there is an influx of adapted mobile devices (smart phones, IPads, Tablets) that are also encouraging advance in mobile Operating Systems like Android and IOS which are slowly phasing out the basic handheld devices. The mobile networks are too advanced and we can now easily access “4G” networks, with more bandwidth to complement the efficiency of the cloud.

In a word, the evolution of mobile computing has already taken off and we are on course to witness more integration of the mobile and the cloud for various applications and services. The few challenges, both anticipated and unanticipated, will see the market surge on and gorge out a technological course of its own.

By John Omwamba

Why Liaison’s Acquisition Of Hubspan Is Good For Cloud Integration

Why Liaison’s Acquisition Of Hubspan Is Good For Cloud Integration

Why Liaison’s Acquisition Of Hubspan Is Good For Cloud Integration

Last week, you may have read about Liaison Technologies’ acquisition of Hubspan and wondered why? After all, the companies share many similarities in cloud integration and cloud services brokerage (CSB) offerings, so is Liaison simply trying to knock out a strong competitor? The answer is an unequivocal “no.” In truth, we’ve been dancing around the idea of combining our two companies for a few years now. A mutual respect grew as we discovered how close we are in our approach to the market and to serving our customers, but the time simply wasn’t right until now.

Since the beginning of the year, we’ve seen the need for cloud integration services rapidly grow and with it, the rise of the cloud services brokerage model. Big data, combined with the accelerated adoption of cloud-based technologies, services, applications and infrastructures, all create a greater need to integrate and manage data as it flows and is consumed by on-premise processes and multiple cloud-based services. Within the last two years, we’ve witnessed most of the major objections to cloud computing—security, control and reliability—be adequately addressed by cloud providers, leading more organizations to adopt a broader range of cloud-based business services and technologies. In addition, there is an ongoing need to share information beyond the firewall with a broader set of external partners.

The intersection of these drivers fuels the need for cloud services brokerages. To be competitive in today’s marketplace, companies have to respond quickly to market opportunities. Cloud services help them do this. The roadblock, however, is the complexity of developing the connections and harmonizing data to tap into these services and the fact that these are mission critical services needing a proven cloud-integration platform to knit this all together. It is a technical and financial burden few companies are equipped to handle. Time-to-market is also a huge factor. Companies in the process of adopting cloud-based infrastructures and applications generally want it to happen fast. A CSB enables companies to quickly take advantage of various cloud services because they’ve already established the connections.

CSBs that are experts at data integration are especially important to companies as they plan their strategy for tapping into additional cloud services and data-as-a-service offerings. Integration CSBs remove the technical challenges of connecting to and managing multiple clouds and integrating and managing data between those services and with on-premise applications. Consolidating (or brokering) multiple cloud services into a single connection between your company and the integration brokerage helps to simplify the on-boarding and use of cloud services, with the added benefit of aggregating, normalizing, customizing and enhancing business information in the cloud. The increasing demand for integration CSB services made the time ripe for Liaison to acquire Hubspan, in order to pool our strengths to better serve this growing market.

Liaison now resides at the confluence of two relatively large and well-established markets as an integration and data management company. Hubspan are experts in business process integration and collaboration. Both companies offer tailored, customized integration CSB solutions to Global 1000 companies for the purpose of solving complex business process integration challenges, but with very little vertical market overlap.

Both Liaison and Hubspan have long believed in the customized approach of managed services. We tailor our services to meet the specific needs of our customers by being very aware of their business processes. This is a contrast to CSBs that simply move information and translate it, indifferent to what’s on the endpoint. Real-time business intelligence is also a key strategy for Liaison and Hubspan. Both companies have built platforms to support it with managed services wrapped around technology to support real-time (not near real-time) business integration. As a combined company, this capability just gets stronger and makes us more valuable to our customers than traditional message-based platform vendors that are trying to convert themselves into CSBs.

With Liaison and Hubspan’s two decades of combined experience, we’re able to double down on the technology to become the industry’s largest cloud integration provider. Our resulting new company is specialized in data management, process integration and data security for cloud-based, on-premise and hybrid solutions, fully dedicated to serving our customers to their fullest advantage and bringing the best solutions to the industry.

By Bob Renner,

Bob Renner is president and CEO of Liaison Technologies, a global provider of secure cloud-based integration and data management services and solutions. For more information, visit www.liaison.com or contact marketing@liaison.com.

How Small Businesses Can Leverage Cloud Computing To Save Money

How Small Businesses Can Leverage Cloud Computing To Save Money

Most small businesses spend a lot on energy bills, even as much as $20,000 per year. This is extremely expensive. According to energy experts, small businesses that are struggling with such exorbitant bills need to rethink their energy policies. Saving on electricity costs can help these businesses lower their expenses. This will boost their overall revenues and efficiency for growth. But even in the face of these realities, what energy-saving models can small businesses use to lower their energy costs? The adoption of cloud computing is one of them.

IT businesses especially stand to gain a lot by adopting cloud computing. For many small businesses where manufacturing is not involved, electricity costs are mainly attributed to their IT departments. In fact, from a recent survey carried out by the CDW Corporation, 52 percent of all companies have asked their IT departments to cut down on electricity consumption-costs. Cloud computing (using work applications stored on remote servers) is a valid alternative that brings energy savings to these businesses.

Cloud computing can help businesses reduce energy-consumption costs through virtualization of essential IT functions and servers. This entails consolidating data centers virtualized through an external provider at much lower costs. According to a similar study, this helps an organization to directly cut energy consumption by as much as 28 percent. Considering small businesses spend a lot of their revenue on electricity costs, these savings can be significant, depending on the size of the organization.

The following factors are the results of virtualization and can help an organization save money by reducing its electricity costs.

  • A small business does not have to host a local server. The server needs are met by a central provider that maintains it. As a result, the small business does not have to keep the server room running at all times as is often the case. Instead, they can enjoy efficient, cost effective electricity consumption.
  • Committing work applications in the cloud encourages employees to telecommute. If your business’ work applications are hosted in the cloud, your employees can work off your business premises. This not only helps your business save on space costs, but also on energy bills.
  • Integrating cloud solutions can also help businesses reduce energy expenses they would otherwise incur if their maintained their servers. Naturally, by having all server hardware off site, cooling, conditioning, and general maintenance energy consumption are cut. Overall, this enables your businesses save costs.

Considering all these, if a small business adopts cloud solutions for their daily IT functions, they can save energy.  Therefore, if your business is struggling with huge energy expenses, its time you reconsidered your IT service functions status on the site. If it was on the cloud, you could save a lot of money and fasten your growth.

By Walter Bailey

The Cloud Is Going Global – Cloud Computing Developments From A Geographical Perspective

The Cloud Is Going Global – Cloud Computing Developments From A Geographical Perspective

Interesting developments and predictions in the cloud computing industry! We are witnessing a new era in the way computing is performed worldwide, as evidenced by the growing propensity among consumers and enterprises to access their information technology resources through cloud computing.

A Market Research Media survey says the cloud market will reach 270 billion dollars in 2020.  Forrester is slightly less optimistic, predicting that the market will approach 241 billion dollars by that time. Visiongain thinks the cloud services market will be worth about 83 billion dollars by the year 2016, while analysts at HP are very confident in the cloud market’s immediate future, estimating that it will hit 143 billion dollars by 2013.

  • Cloud computing around the world

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) Global Cloud Scorecard established a ranking of a countries readiness to drive the growth of a globally integrated cloud marketplace. The top five rankings for markets with the most robust cloud policies went to Japan, Australia, Germany, the United States, and France.

According to the BSA study, 88 percent of the world’s self-identified cloud users say they use cloud services for personal purposes, with 33 percent saying they use cloud services for business. In both cases, the figures are slightly higher in emerging economies such as Thailand, Malaysia, Argentina and Peru than in mature ones such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France.

  • Japan ranks first

There is a clear divide in cloud readiness between advanced economies and the developing world. Japan, the U.S, and EU all have established solid legal and regulatory bases to support the growth of a cloud computing, while developing countries, such as China, India and Brazil, have the most work to do to integrate into a cloud computing market.

Japan ranks first because it has clear and well defined privacy protections that don’t inhibit commerce, a full range of criminal and IP protections, and a massive IT infrastructure. The nation also is a leader in developing international technology standards.

  • Where does Europe stand?

As we all know, Europe is not a unique state with a single government and a single set of rules. However, the existence of the European Union (EU) does come with a large degree of homogeneity in treating technical innovations like cloud computing.

While embracing the cloud, Europe has been wary of security issues. The BSA study’s most surprising finding is that some of the countries that are doing well are also adopting laws and regulations that conflict with other countries. For example, the European Union’s proposed Data Protection Regulation could undermine the potential scale and economic impact of the cloud.

  • Indicators for Growth of Cloud Computing in Africa

The recent development of cloud computing as a paradigm for economic growth opens great opportunities for African countries that wish to engage in world markets despite lacking the traditional infrastructure necessary to compete in those markets.

At the present, on the African continent only mobile technology has seen significant growth. However, the last year’s landing of three broadband submarine fiber-optic cables promises to bring increased connectivity to the region, leading to a wave of broadband penetration. Of course, we do have to keep in mind that cloud computing will require more than just mobile penetration and broadband connections.

  • In conclusion

Regardless of what the future has for us, user-friendly and technological innovations like cloud computing will always be of great interest for businesses around the world.  We just have to keep up!

By Rick Blaisdell / Rickscloud

A Cure For Small Business IT Aches & Pains: It’s In The Cloud

A Cure For Small Business IT Aches & Pains: It’s In The Cloud

A Cure For Small Business IT Aches & Pains: It’s In The Cloud

New technology can make the lives of small and midsize businesses (SMBs)  more complicated.

In a survey conducted by Techaisle, a small and medium sized business (SMB) market research organization, 54 percent of SMBs claimed that their IT difficulties actually increased over the past 3 years. Another 39 percent said these IT struggles outweighed their business challenges.

As these small businesses constantly find themselves dealing with IT issues rather than reaping the benefits of these solutions, precious time and resources are being diverted from identifying new market opportunities to grow their business.

The potential benefits of new technology though are huge: with the rise of Big Data, increasing amounts of information are available to small businesses from the places that consumers visit to express themselves, such as Facebook “likes” on a product, or “check-ins” via mobile device applications like Foursquare. These pieces of information, when looked at as a whole, give SMBs the ability to get to know their customers in a whole new way.   It can certainly be intimidating though. According to IDC’s Digital Universe Study, the digital universe doubles every year, generating 2 zettabytes this year compared to just 1 last year.

With this data influx growing every day, there is a pressing need to simplify IT more than ever, but many SMBs just don’t have the bandwidth or the resources to spare for effectively dealing with their IT aches. According to Techaisle, 72 percent of SMBs say that IT vendors should simplify their technology offerings, to make them easier to implement.  This presents a real opportunity for technology providers that offer SMBs personalized solutions, which integrate with other business tools and are easy to understand.

So that they can focus on generating new revenue streams and increasing profits rather than curing IT headaches, many SMBs are turning to Managed Service Providers (MSPs). The MSPs provide the resources to deal with these technical obstacles, so that employees can shift their focus back to growing and improving the business.  In addition, MSPs provide skilled IT expertise, very often specific to different industries, which allows the SMB user to increase their technical capabilities while maintaining cohesiveness.

Through cloud-based analytics solutions, many MSPs are helping their small and midsized clients store and analyze vast amounts of data without risking a drop-off in performance,e and without the small business owner incurring the cost of running and maintaining the necessary tools. By harnessing the power of Big Data, SMBs can gain valuable insight to help shape the direction of their business.

The point is, SMBs need to take advantage of advanced IT solutions, while vendors and third parties need to simplify the management of these solutions. This combination will lead to better business without taking away any opportunities for growth.

By Andy Monshaw

General Manager, IBM Global Midmarket Business

 

Open Source Business Models

Open Source Business Models

Open-source business models are employed by companies that rely on development of open source software to make profit. These models are essential for these companies to remain economically viable. These companies are known as Commercial Open Source Software (COSS) or Professional Open Source Software (POSS). The following are some of the models that they use.

Dual Licensing: The POSS provide two different licenses for the same open source software. The software is available under both open source and commercial licenses. The POSS make profit by selling software under commercial license. It is important to understand why someone would choose to pay for software that is available for free. Under the open source GPL licensing, if the open source software is linked to proprietary software, the proprietary software also becomes open source. Consumers buy open source software to avoid this. MySql and SugarCRM are among the examples of POSS using dual licensing.

Split Open Source Software: The open source software is split into portions. The first part provides all the basic features and is available under the open source license. The other parts are extensions of the features of the first part. These extensions are available under commercial license and the company is making profit from selling them.

Product Specialization: In this model, the POSS provide the open source software for free. As the open source software has presence in many different domains, these companies provide training and consultancy on specific domains, earning significant revenue.

Platform Providers: With the introduction of service-oriented architecture we no longer buy software from one particular vendor. We build software using components from different vendors and integrate them into one system. There are various risks and issues that need to be considered if all these components are open source. Integrating components can be a challenging task as not all software has common requirements. Community support, resources required, integration, and finding the right version are among the issues that entail serious consideration. To avoid these overwhelming issues, consumers are willing to pay the company to deliver a platform that is tested and verified. A good example of platform-provider business model is Zend, a platform for developing PHP applications.

By Jake Rosenblum

Cloudless Europe: Most Europeans Have Yet To Hear Of Cloud Computing

Cloudless Europe: Most Europeans Have Yet To Hear Of Cloud Computing

Europe has been at the forefront of global development, having led the colonization of a huge portion of the world. Economic and social empowerment has been on an upward scale, making it a developed country. Surprisingly, a huge proportion of the population is yet to venture into cloud computing. Considering that, there is only one Europe, and most of us would not expect such slow uptake of a game-changing innovation, let me state that again.

A study by BSA, 34% of Europeans were aware of cloud computing service and had actually consumed such. In the study, over 4000 individuals were interviewed from across Europe, with the aim of assessing their views regarding cloud computing. Reponses to questions regarding what cloud computing is ranged from ‘I have no idea what it is’ to ‘I have never heard of it’. It is impossible to overlook the weaknesses of scientific study, sampling and other aspects of surveys, but these figures were actually the product of a widespread study across the whole of Europe. Of the few people who reportedly utilized cloud-computing services, close to 90% relied on it for personal uses. As a result, the contributing of cloud computing to strategic placement by businesses was still at elementary levels.

Similar trends were observed in the US, with some individuals reportedly associating cloud computing with brands of consumer goods. This comes in the wake of concerted efforts by high profile marketers and harmonized campaigns, aimed at preparing consumers for the upcoming challenges and benefits. The findings of the study were baffling in more ways that one. First, a wide range of individuals pretended to know what cloud computing is, while others were already consuming the services without knowing what it entails. However, it was common knowledge that most people who actually conversed about cloud computing relied on hearsay and that factual expertise was seriously lacking.

With regards to the recent cloud movement, it is expected that countries with the highest consumption of internet services would be the primary consumers as well. Past studies have indicated that socio-economic status of the residents in the US and Europe provides the most opportune environment for consumption of internet.

As the EC prepared to dust its coats and develop a cloud computing strategy for the EC, the relevant government bodies are keen on enjoying the efficiencies of the services. Numerous efforts are required to ensure that the EU leapfrogs to the global standards in consumption of these services. Since the region has sufficient infrastructure to handle the requirements, it is necessary for decisive and focused steps to be taken.

By Rick Watson

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Computing Offers Key Benefits For Small, Medium Businesses

Cloud Computing Offers Key Benefits For Small, Medium Businesses

Cloud Computing Benefits A growing number of small and medium businesses in the United States rely on as a means of deploying mission-critical software products. Prior to the advent of cloud-based products — software solutions delivered over the Internet – companies were often forced to invest in servers and other products to run software and…

The Future Of Cybersecurity

The Future Of Cybersecurity

The Future of Cybersecurity In 2013, President Obama issued an Executive Order to protect critical infrastructure by establishing baseline security standards. One year later, the government announced the cybersecurity framework, a voluntary how-to guide to strengthen cybersecurity and meanwhile, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted to approve the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), moving it one…

Cloud Infographic – The Future (IoT)

Cloud Infographic – The Future (IoT)

The Future (IoT) By the year 2020, it is being predicted that 40 to 80 billion connected devices will be in use. The Internet of Things or IoT will transform your business and home in many truly unbelievable ways. The types of products and services that we can expect to see in the next decade…

Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

IoT For Automotive Deconstructed The IoT automotive industry is moving rapidly with many exciting growth opportunities available. We’ve written about some of the risks and benefits as well as some of the players involved. One thing for certain as that the auto industry is starting to take notice and we can expect the implementation of a…

Cloud Infographic – The Internet Of Things In 2020

Cloud Infographic – The Internet Of Things In 2020

The Internet Of Things In 2020 The growing interest in the Internet of Things is amongst us and there is much discussion. Attached is an archived but still relevant infographic by Intel which has produced a memorizing snapshot at how the number of connected devices have exploded since the birth of the Internet and PC.…

Cloud Computing Price War Rages On

Cloud Computing Price War Rages On

Cloud Computing Price War There’s little question that the business world is a competitive place, but probably no area in business truly defines cutthroat quite like cloud computing. At the moment, we are witnessing a heated price war pitting some of the top cloud providers against each other, all in a big way to attract…

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Unusual Clandestine Cloud Data Centre Service Locations

Unusual Clandestine Cloud Data Centre Service Locations

Unusual Clandestine Cloud Data Centre Service Locations Everyone knows what the cloud is, but does everybody know where the cloud is? We try to answer that as we look at some of the most unusual data centre locations in the world. Under the Eyes of a Deity Deep beneath the famous Uspenski Cathedral in the…

Internet Of Things – Industrial Robots And Virtual Monitoring

Internet Of Things – Industrial Robots And Virtual Monitoring

Internet Of Things – Industrial Robots And Virtual Monitoring One of the hottest topics in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is the Internet of Things (IOT). According to the report of International Telecommunication Union (2012), “the Internet of things can be perceived as a vision with technological and societal implications. It is considered as a…

Why Hybrid Cloud Delivers Better Business Agility

Why Hybrid Cloud Delivers Better Business Agility

Why Hybrid Cloud Delivers Better Business Agility A CIO friend of mine once told me that a hybrid cloud model enables him to “own the base, rent the spike” when it comes to unplanned events. Let’s face it – maintaining unused infrastructure for rare or random IT events is expensive and unnecessary in a cloud…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Hybrid Cloud Environments After several years of steady cloud adoption in the enterprise, an interesting trend has emerged: More companies are retaining their existing, on-premise IT infrastructures while also embracing the latest cloud technologies. In fact, IDC predicts markets for such hybrid cloud environments will grow from the over $25 billion global market we saw…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. Saleforce.com chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

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Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…