Author Archives: CloudTweaks

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Terrified

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Terrified



October-Halloween

By David Fletcher

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Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

It was as cloudy as Edinburgh could be in the autumn, when the “Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress” featuring about 300 Cloud Computing stake-holders, gathered for the event that was held during the last week of September, produced By MISTI Europe.csa-sm

The variety of organizations participating demonstrated the array of topics relevant to Cloud Computing adoption. Standards institutions – alongside government bodies, cloud providers and software vendors – demonstrated the challenges facing Cloud Computing. The considerable number of non-EU presenters further demonstrated the globalization process this technology is going through these days, as well as the EU’s role in its advancement.

The Congress’s topics could generally be divided into three major categories: government access to data (inspired by PRISM); the cloud providers’ lack of transparency; and the technological challenges facing Cloud Computing adoption.

The congress began with an excellent keynote presentation from Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer for F-Secure. Circling the stage, Mr. Hypponen listed the new cyber threats facing the world, and predicted that will see be attacks on every device equipped with processor in order to use CPU time for Bitcoins mining, and that malware will start maliciously locking our cloud services for ransom.

Regarding government access to data, the F-Secure CRO mentioned how surprised he was to learn how far the NSA is willing to go in order to weaken the standards we all rely upon, and speculated that direct access to providers was not a result of providers cooperation, but rather due to massive hacking attempts by the NSA. The example given was the recent finding published by “Der Spiegel” about the British Intelligence services’ hacking the Belgian Telecom Company.

Another interesting lecture regarding governments’ access to data was given by Jon Callas, co-founder of PGP and Silent Circle. This top cryptographer reviewed the different sources for surveillance: the various nations’ surveillance levels such as anti-terror, crime prospecting, and economic espionage. Non-national surveillance includes that done by criminals; corporate espionage; and companies such as Google which utilize business models to collect customer data. Callas described the efforts Silent Circle is making in order to help customers avoid different kinds of surveillance, and described the process’s two pathways: technological tools such as encryption and ammonization, and procedures and policies that will define how to safely and confidentially guard the users.

In a later panel regarding PRISM, Mr. Callas revealed the story behind the difficult decision to close Silent Circle’s secure e-mail services, immediately after they had learned that another secure e-mail provider, Lavabit, was served with a federal warrant to reveal data. Current e-mail protocol is just too difficult to secure due to email headers and metadata information saved for each e-mail, he explained.

Government access to data is not the only thing preventing the required trust in Cloud Computing. Cloud provider transparency, or lack of it, is also a major obstacle. Microsoft, Google, HP, Amazon and Adobe all presented and shared their recent efforts to provide transparency to their operation, as well as ways to increase trust. Adriana Hall from Microsoft presented the latest survey regarding Cloud Computing adoption, revealing that although most customers expressed concerns regarding the security and privacy of their data in the cloud, a majority of the companies said that security had actually improved by moving to the cloud.  In her presentation, Ms. Hall exhibited the steps Microsoft is taking in order to increase trust – including complying with different regulations, and advertising their cloud products’ development and operations control to designated Trust centers.

Similar claims came from Adobe and Google, who were very keen to present the measures they are taking in order to protect data. David Lenoe, Director of Product Security at Adobe, described his goals as good architecture, solid code and security in operations. He elaborated on some of the steps Adobe is performing in order to achieve them:  SDLC adoption and security training incorporating the martial arts style, with different colored belts given to each level of security awareness. Eran Feigenbaum, Director of Security for Google apps, said that the question is not whether the data is protected in the cloud, but whether it is protected outside of it. He presented a survey demonstrating that 60% of corporate data is located on unprotected laptops. “Cloud providers are built differently“, he explained, “their software is built for resilience, and homogeneous environments make security more robust“.

In the race for transparency and trust, standardization is a cornerstone. The amount of time dedicated in the Congress for reviewing the topics of cloud standards demonstrates how much progress has been made on this subject in the last year. During the Congress, the Cloud Security Alliance announced the launch of its new STAR certificate for cloud providers. The certification, based on ISO27001, was developed along with BSI, and is the first independent and technology-neutral certification aimed at providing more transparency to the industry.

Certification and standards are also regarded by governments as important in promoting Cloud Computing. According to Tjabbe Bos from the cloud unit of the EU commission, the EU Cloud Computing strategy’s aim is to produce 3.8 million additional jobs, and to add 950 Billion EURO to the GDP by 2020.  The way to implement the strategy, Mr. Bos added, is through three key actions:  building safe and fair contracts; establishing EU partnerships among all cloud stakeholders; and cutting through the chaos of conflicting standards and regulations.  Later on, the ENISA head of secure infrastructure and services explained how ENISA is helping the EU to achieve its cloud strategy, by formalizing standards and certification, and establishing international and national corporations. “In the Japanese tsunami disaster, the only emergency services that were able to continue operating were the cloud-based ones“, Dr. Ouzounis revealed, “and therefore we treat it as critical infrastructure and our future digital life backbone“.

From the technological point of view, the challenges that occupied the crowd were similar to last year, and included new format and use cases for encryptions, challenges for authentication and identity management, API security, and mobile and big data.

encryption

The encryption solutions presented by companies such as Brainloop and Seclore were file level encryption (IRM) tools and services aiming at providing control, access list and audit throughout the document life cycle, and sharing. IRM and file level encryption technology has been around for some time, but failed to move forward at the enterprise level. Perhaps in the cloud era this technology will succeed, due to sharing and the flexible nature of cloud services. Other identity and authentication solutions were presented by PerfectCloud and Nok Nok labs, which presented the FIDO alliance solution for Internet authentication.

It was also agreed – in a panel about the future of Cloud Computing security trends – that API security will be a central component of the security architecture. “In a world of mobile and the Internet of things, everything is API based“, said Mark O’Neill, VP of Innovation at Axway, who demonstrated in his presentation the technology of the API gateway and how they can assist organizations in future API driven attacks.

An interesting and unique new technology was presented by SkyHigh security. According to Gartner, by 2015 35% of an organization’s IT spending will not be made by the IT department (called Shadow IT), mainly due to the ease of use and ease of purchase of Cloud Computing services. This information encapsulates a great threat to the status of the CIO. SkyHigh enables the IT department to track and analyze the different cloud services used by the organization – formally and informally – and understand the potential risk associated with those services. An example of the importance of discovering and managing such services was given by Michael Mattmiller from Microsoft, who shared a story about hospital personnel using a cloud knowledge sharing service to increase productivity among them. However, when the CIO found out and examined the data uploaded to the cloud and the provider service agreement, the hospital had to report a security breach to the authorities, and suffer the consequences.

In conclusion, when comparing the 2013 Congress to the previous one last year, the feeling is that cloud services have matured considerably, although there were some minor disruptions such as PRISM. While last year the debate revolved around the advantages and reasons to move to the cloud, this year the discussions were about when and how. A great contribution was made to this process by the governments and the different standardization institutes – which understood their role in the cloud adoption process; by the providers, who generally try to listen to customers and adopt more transparent offering; and by the Cloud Security Alliance, which exhibited a quick understanding of the different crossroads ahead and invested in the right tools for enabling safer cloud adoption.

moshe-ferberBy Moshe Ferber,

Moshe is an security entrepreneur and investor. With over 20 years’ experience in information security at various industry positions.  Currently focused on Cloud Computing as board member for Cloud  alliance Israeli Chapter, public speaker on various cloud aspects and investor at Clarisite and FortyCloud – Startup companies with innovative security solutions. More information can be found at: www.onlinecloudsec.com
Cloud Spectator’s Benchmark Report: Amazon vs Internap vs Rackspace

Cloud Spectator’s Benchmark Report: Amazon vs Internap vs Rackspace

Cloud Spectator’s Benchmark Report: Amazon vs Internap vs Rackspace

Analyst firm Cloud Spectator compares performance, consistency and value between Internap AgileSERVER bare-metal cloud, Amazon Web Services EC2 and Rackspace OpenCloud

ATLANTA – October 24, 2013Internap Network Services Corporation (NASDAQ: INAP), a provider of high-performance hosting services, today announced the results of a Cloud Spectator report, “Performance Analysis: Benchmarks of Bare-Metal & Virtual Clouds,” which found that Internap’s bare-metal cloud, AgileSERVER, offers as much as an order of magnitude better performance, consistency and value when compared to similar virtual cloud configurations for Amazon Web Services Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and Rackspace OpenCloud. Cloud Spectator is an independent analyst group focused on Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) performance and pricing.

Cloud Spectator’s key findings include:

  • System Performance – Internap’s bare-metal cloud outperformed AWS by 10x and Rackspace by 7x in a UnixBench system test, which is an indicator of the performance of a Unix-like system when running a single or multiple tasks.
  • CPU Performance – Internap’s bare-metal cloud outperformed AWS by an average of 4x and Rackspace by 2.5x in three CPU tests of file compression, audio encoding and video encoding.
  • RAM Performance – Internap’s bare-metal cloud outperformed AWS by 2x and Rackspace by 1.7x in a RAM test that measured COPY, SCALE, ADD and TRIAD functions.
  • Internal Network Performance – Internap’s bare-metal cloud led AWS and Rackspace in internal network throughput and latency performance tests, outperforming both providers by 2.5x.

Cloud Spectator’s report also revealed that Internap’s bare-metal cloud not only leads AWS and Rackspace’s virtual configurations in performance, but also offered significantly better performance for a similar price. Cloud Spectator’s price-performance score1 for Internap’s bare-metal cloud was more than six times higher than that of AWS or Rackspace, making Internap the price-performance leader relative to these virtual IaaS offerings.

Read Full Release: http://www.internap.com/about-us-internap/newsroom

benchmark-networkbench-marks-cloud

Several additional benchmark results can be found at: Cloud Spectator

4 Tools To Help Enable A Successful Cloud Computing Experience

4 Tools To Help Enable A Successful Cloud Computing Experience

4 Tools To Help Enable A Successful Cloud Computing Experience

Since the introduction of the cloud, “business as usual” has transformed. This technology has allowed companies to better their IT performances, and ultimately, their services for consumers.

Just a few years ago, the cloud was a nearly incomprehensible concept to the world. Now, nearly every business uses the cloud and some even sell cloud computing services to other enterprises. Most recently, Verizon Internet and IBM announced their cloud computing services. And other major companies, like Cisco and Amazon have been in the business for several years.

tools-cloud

Image Source: Shutterstock)

With the right tool, you can manage the cloud, cut costs and use your resources most efficiently. Here are four tools your company can use for a successful cloud computing experience:

1. Cloudyn

Cloudyn offers several tools exclusively focused on Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud but will soon include Microsoft Azure, GoGrid and Rackspace. The tools help corporate IT gain financial intelligence in cloud investments while improving performance.

The average user saves approximately 40% of cloud-related costs. Use the Reserved Instance Navigator to purchase EC2 and RDS instances, reduce spending, manage RI inventory and simulate RI costs. Use the S3 Tracker to analyze how your storage is used so you can better your efficiency. In addition to these tools, four other tools are available to help save you money and enhance your business.

2. Enstratius

Whether your business has a public, private or a hybrid cloud, Enstratius can help. The tool can be aligned with the governance and security requirements of a business. With Enstratius, you can easily manage each enterprise-class application in an effective manner.

The many features make this one of the best cross-platform cloud management tools. Login just once to manage every cloud resource.  According to computerworld.com, “Features include self-service provision/de-provisioning; multi-currency cost/chargeback tracking; [and] customizable role-based access control.”

3. RightScale

RightScale has many other tools beat in experience. It’s been around since 2006 and has helped launch millions of servers. According to computerweekly.com, there are four main parts of RightScale. The first is a cloud management environment. You’ll also find a multi-cloud engine as well as an adaptable automation engine. Last, RightScale offers a cloud-ready ServerTemplate and Best Practice Deployment Library.

The cloud workload management service has a popular tool, PlanForCloud, that uses statistics to estimate cloud spending and to help companies save. Best of all, there is a free edition of RightScale that includes a web-based dashboard and can aid with configuration and management.

4. Puppet Enterprise

This IT automation software allows for the ultimate management experiences in the cloud or on-premises. According to its website, Puppet Enterprise “gives system administrators the power to easily automate repetitive tasks, quickly deploy critical applications, and proactively manage infrastructure.”

This tool helps out from the start of the IT infrastructure lifecycle to the end. It allows users to discover cloud nodes, to reuse previously-used configuration modules, deploy updates across multiple servers at once and even more! There is a free version of this software that allows you to manage 10 nodes.

By Elizabeth Phillips,

Elizabeth is a former IT professional who is currently freelance writing. She can be found reading about the latest and greatest trends in the IT world and typing away on her laptop in Philadelphia, PA. 

Big Problems, Big Payoff: Setting Up Your Own Cloud Server

Big Problems, Big Payoff: Setting Up Your Own Cloud Server

Big Problems, Big Payoff: Setting Up Your Own Cloud Server

Your boss just informed you that you need to start migrating all of your server applications to the cloud. How would you go about doing that? Is it even possible? Your mind starts to whirl with the issues you can already see cropping up over the following weeks and months.

cloud-build-scale

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Setting up a cloud server on your existing infrastructure is easier and less painful than you think. However, there are a number of potential problems you’ll want to plan for ahead of time, and your new cloud server will require a substantial investment upfront to get it up and running. Here is a sample of some of the issues you might encounter:

The Basics 

Let’s go over what you do know at this point. You need to take your existing server infrastructure and applications and transform them into a cloud-based platform. You can keep your existing Windows or Linux operating system, but you’ll need to install a hypervisor-based server application, which allows you to monitor all of your virtual machines at the same time.

You can install your hypervisor-based server application in one of two places. A native hypervisor is installed directly on the server without first going through a separate operating system, which should be sufficient for your needs. Hosted hypervisors run through operating systems and provide greater flexibility. For example, you could run multiple operating systems both with and without hypervisors, or you could even use different hypervisors if you prefer.

As far as your cloud migration is concerned, the hypervisor you choose is the single most important application you’ll install. It will allow you to effortlessly maintain your server and troubleshoot any issues in a fraction of the time.

The Hard Part’s Done

Virtualization has been around for a lot longer than the concept of cloud computing, which is what most network administrators have difficulty with at first. Once you have your hypervisors and operating systems installed in the correct hierarchy, all that remains to get your cloud server fully operational is to provide your company’s employees with remote access. Fortunately, you shouldn’t run into any trouble at all with this process, and you’ll likely find it tedious more than anything else.

After you have the entire cloud server set up and configured to your specifications, you’ll want to take this time and test, test, and test some more. Remember that you aren’t just adding a single new application — you’re completely rebuilding your server from the ground up. Applications probably won’t work at first, and putting in the extra hours now will help your cloud server work perfectly or at least well enough when you turn it on for real.

Scaling Your Hardware Up

Every business wants to grow. They want more employees, more revenue, and more space. Cloud computing makes growth easy. Let’s say that your company averaged 50 percent resource usage two years ago, 70 percent usage last year, and 90 percent usage this year. You’ve probably already started receiving complaints from employees who can’t load software or files quickly.

You can easily upgrade a cloud server with additional processors, memory, and hard drives without breaking a sweat, but dedicated servers require significantly more time and money to upgrade. By adding additional hardware for all applications at the same time, you’ll never need to partition resources for one application or another.

The Ups and Downs of Sharing Resources 

We all learned that sharing was beneficial when we were just a few years old, but we would occasionally grow upset when we had to part with a favorite toy. Just as in real life, sharing server resources benefits all virtual applications most of the time.

Imagine that you have 10 different applications that all use a maximum of 10 GB of memory but an average of just 3 GB. Instead of installing 100 GB of memory, you could likely get away with installing 50 or 60 GB while keeping overall usage low. Applications won’t always use the same amount of memory or hard drive space, and your cloud server will seamlessly allocate resources from application A to application B if employees aren’t currently using application A.

As previously mentioned, sharing is good most of the time, but when can it cause a problem? Let’s say your company hosts a website on a cloud server, and Black Friday is coming up. If your hardware isn’t up to the challenge, the influx of new customers might drag your server to a standstill. If all of your resources are tied up, employees won’t be able to get work done, and customers won’t be able to make any additional purchases.

Time to Invest in a Generator

Nature happens, and it’s up to you to prepare for unforeseen events. If the power goes out during the night, your employees won’t be able to work from home unless your cloud server has a generator backup. If your company already uses a generator, you’re good to go. If not, now might be a good time to upgrade your facilities.

Ensuring that Employees Have Sufficient Access

Software as a service, or SaaS, applications are fantastic because they don’t require software installations on every single computer. However, they only work when your employees have reliable Internet access. Keep that in mind if your employees need to travel on a regular basis — you might want to remind them to schedule flights on Wi-Fi-enabled flights if possible.

You Never Have Enough Security 

Do you have enough security? Trick question! You will never have enough security. Although your cloud services should be relatively isolated from one another through software, remember that they’re still on the same hardware. If you’re migrating to cloud computing, now is the time to boost those encryption standards.

A data protection manager, or DPM, will also help protect and keep track of your data from one central location. Different DPMs can protect different workloads like SQL and Exchange, but you might have to install two or more DPMs to protect all of your data.

Rapid Updates 

Speaking of security, most cloud platforms will automatically update your applications. That’s less work for you and your IT staff, and you’ll never need to fix critical vulnerabilities in the middle of the night again. In fact, cloud platforms are so convenient that you’ll have plenty of time to devote to other projects.

Employee Training 

You’ll need to provide seminars, tutorials, and other resources to educate employees on how to use your cloud applications. Expect hundreds of questions in the first few days after you migrate to a new platform, but most confusion should clear up within a week or two. However, employee training is one of those things IT departments typically forget to prepare for.

The Bottom Line 

Making the switch to cloud computing readies your business for any amount of future growth while slashing IT costs. We could extoll the virtues of cloud computing all day, but the fact is that migrating to a new platform will require time, effort, and a healthy dose of troubleshooting. Once you get your new server off the ground, you should experience smooth sailing moving forward.

By Anthony Lévesque /GloboTech Communications

Cloud Infographic: 2013 Cyber Security Intelligence Index

Cloud Infographic: 2013 Cyber Security Intelligence Index

Cloud Infographic: 2013 Cyber Security Intelligence Index

Based on daily monitoring of security for more than 4,000 clients, IBM has determined that DDoS attacks are on the rise. The average large company must filter through 1,400 cyber attacks weekly according to the IBM Cyber Security Intelligence Index. But many organizations do not have the on-site expertise or the right IT skills and tools required to combat them. Also, many do not have an incident response program in place or rely on existing programs that are out of date, not regularly tested or recently updated to address the growing exponential threats.  Continue Reading

cybersecurity_infographic

Infographic Source: IBM

Virtualization As A Key Component Of Cloud Computing

Virtualization As A Key Component Of Cloud Computing

Virtualization as a key component of cloud computing

Virtualization is one of the key components of the cloud computing paradigm, especially in infrastructure as a service model where the mentioned technology is essential to provide a large set of computing resources. Some experts even define cloud computing as simple as virtualized hardware and software plus advanced monitoring and resource management technologies.

VMware

Virtualization has changed the ICT, and some of its benefits include reduction of hardware vendor lock-in, faster disaster recovery, ability to extend life of old legacy applications, and reduction of operational costs.

However, implementation of virtualization is rarely simple in enterprise environment. If you use virtualization on your machine only to run some legacy applications or have multiple operating systems available, this technology is very simple. You have to install chosen virtualization software, create/modify the image, and start to work. Even for absolute beginners, there are a lot of free online tutorials. On the other hand, if you deal with multiple database systems, complex enterprise applications where some application are on-premise and some deployed on different cloud services, the story becomes a quite different one. In the aforementioned case, you will need a great amount of computing resources and sophisticated virtualization expertise. Therefore, any initiative that freely provides computing resources, complex virtualization software, and expert knowledge is welcome.

One of the most exciting parts about working in ICT is also the ability to attend conferences where you can discuss your work and complex problems with people from your field. Currently, the budget for conferences has been reduced at many businesses. Part of solution could be virtual online conferences that enable networking opportunities without leaving your office. I’ve attended a few of these online events in the past, and my experience is positive, I have always managed to learn something useful and meet interesting people from my field.

There’s a good event coming up October 22 for anyone interested in learning more about virtualization. Online VMware Forum 2013 is free to attend, and the best part is that they offer the people capability to experiment with VMWare products free with hands on lab online. Lab is running in minutes with full technical capabilities, and at the same time you can chat live with VMware experts who can answer your questions. You can also navigate in a 3D virtual environment with interactive booths, and test the virtualization solutions without having to install anything on your machine. Attending this event you can also learn how to simplify your IT infrastructure and hear VMWare and virtualization experts’ discussions on how to find solutions to complex IT problems.

The agenda for the event include themes such as: vSphere and vCloud Suite, Virtualization Management, Virtualization 101, Cloud Management, End User Computing, Business Continuity/Disaster Recovery

You can find more information and sign-up details for this free event here.

By Darko Androcec

(Post Sponsored By VMware)

CloudTweaks Comics
Big Data – Top Critical Technology Trend For The Next Five Years

Big Data – Top Critical Technology Trend For The Next Five Years

Big Data Future Today’s organizations should become more collaborative, virtual, adaptive, and agile in order to be successful in complex business world. They should be able to respond to changes and market needs. Many organizations found that the valuable data they possess and how they use it can make them different than others. In fact,…

The Global Rise of Cloud Computing

The Global Rise of Cloud Computing

The Global Rise of Cloud Computing Despite the rapid growth of cloud computing, the cloud still commands a small portion of overall enterprise IT spending. Estimates I’ve seen put the percentage between 5% and 10% of the slightly more than $2 trillion (not including telco) spent worldwide in 2014 on enterprise IT. Yet growth projections…

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation Digital transformation is the acceleration of business activities, processes, and operational models to fully embrace the changes and opportunities of digital technologies. The concept is not new; we’ve been talking about it in one way or another for decades: paperless office, BYOD, user experience, consumerization of IT – all of these were stepping…

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security Security is one of those IT concerns that aren’t problematic until disaster strikes. It might be tomorrow, it could be next week or next year. The fact is that poor security leaves businesses wide open for data loss and theft. News outlets just skim the surface, but hackers cost business up…

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

Ambitious Startups An oft-quoted statistic, 50% of new businesses fail within five years. And the culling of startups is even more dramatic, with an estimated nine out of ten folding. But to quote Steve Jobs, “I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.” So while…

Cloud Computing – The Real Story Is About Business Strategy, Not Technology

Cloud Computing – The Real Story Is About Business Strategy, Not Technology

Enabling Business Strategies The cloud is not really the final destination: It’s mid-2015, and it’s clear that the cloud paradigm is here to stay. Its services are growing exponentially and, at this time, it’s a fluid model with no steady state on the horizon. As such, adopting cloud computing has been surprisingly slow and seen more…

Cloud Computing Price War Rages On

Cloud Computing Price War Rages On

Cloud Computing Price War There’s little question that the business world is a competitive place, but probably no area in business truly defines cutthroat quite like cloud computing. At the moment, we are witnessing a heated price war pitting some of the top cloud providers against each other, all in a big way to attract…

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The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Benefits of Cloud Computing Based on Aberdeen Group’s Computer Intelligence Dataset, there are more than 1.6 billion permutations to choose from when it comes to cloud computing solutions. So what, on the face of it, appears to be pretty simple is actually both complex and dynamic regardless of whether you’re in the market for networking,…

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter The city of the future is impeccably documented. Sensors are used to measure air quality, traffic patterns, and crowd movement. Emerging neighborhoods are quickly recognized, public safety threats are found via social networks, and emergencies are dealt with quicklier. Crowdsourcing reduces commuting times, provides people with better transportation…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

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Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

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There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

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The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

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Security In The IoT The network security market is experiencing a pressing and transformative change, especially around access control and orchestration. Although it has been mature for decades, the network security market had to transform rapidly with the advent of the BYOD trend and emergence of the cloud, which swept enterprises a few years ago.…