Author Archives: Jeff Norman

Is The Cloud Nickel-and-Diming You?

Is the Cloud Nickel-and-Diming You?

Cloud’s popularity of late is currently riding on a wave that undulates with the thrill of the financial benefits users stand to gain. Many applications grounded in cloud computing are offered a la carte and ready at a single mouse click from a user. These values of customization and accessibility have rendered cloud such a valuable hit for businesses and personal users alike.

Nevertheless, the use of cloud computing technology doesn’t necessarily translate into an IT platform that slashes a business’ financial burden with a bang. Nor does using the cloud mean that users will save a penny at all. Here’s something that cloud’s most ardent advocates might avoid mentioning: it could potentially cost some users more money to use the cloud.

It can prove a challenge to properly assess the costs involved with cloud. Shrewd usage of the technology calls on, for example, gauging the correct number of servers required to execute a particular demand or enable a certain application. Trial and error are often part and parcel of this process. Yet every trial or error that doesn’t bring about the optimum cloud configuration can be termed a definite loss of some sort — revenue, time, a lapse in strategy, or good old-fashioned IT frustration. Exorbitant demands of a cloud setup — running the servers incessantly, for example – make it likelier than an unexpected hiccup will thwart a business’ plan to economize.

As mentioned earlier, the cloud can be configured to work when you need it and downsized or frozen when you don’t. This freedom of use can unfortunately lead to circumstances of inadvertent overuse of the cloud, such as when a server remains cloud-engaged by mistake when its power was no longer necessary. Cloud users may not quibble over a minor sum of revenue lost on a single server. But one could successfully argue that most cloud users employ far more than a single server; their fleet might mushroom into the hundreds. Being unwittingly nickel-and-dimed hundreds of times over would leave anyone in a state to cry someone a river.

What is truly vexing is that the user herself is the one committing the nickel-and-dime crimes. A failure to meticulously manage servers to the nth detail can lead to a financial farrago, as a woeful CEO discovered after having lost $23,000 to unattended servers.

The conversation encircling quality and price control in the cloud exceeds what I can sum up here. Suffice it to say, however, that only a good dose of nitpicking can sufficiently hold the threat of nickel-and-diming at bay.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Computing Champions Wimbledon Tennis Tournament

Cloud Computing Champions Wimbledon Tennis Tournament

The All England Lawn Tennis Club serves as host to the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, considered by many as third only to the Olympics and World Cup in terms of athletic prestige. Celebrities, dignitaries, and luminaries in myriad disciplines annually frequent the event; their presence indicates the massive respect and worldwide popularity that Wimbledon attracts. Such high regard has naturally spilled over into the World Wide Web and produces a once-yearly Internet sensation. But the watchword here is “once-yearly.”

Outside of the two weeks of Wimbledon championship action, in late June and early July, the eponymous website may receive at most half a million unique visits. Yet that figure skyrocketed to 50 million hits during the 2011 Wimbledon fortnight, a potentially frightening growth in demand on a website that insiders refer to as spikiness.

Indeed, the Wimbledon tennis competition easily qualifies as a textbook case study in how to manage a spiky uptick in demand for trustworthy storage and power in computing. Though every website covets massive traffic, too much of it can drown servers and send inexperienced IT staff heading for the hills. Yet spikiness can also generate revenue and increased visibility when properly channeled.

Enter cloud computing to save the day and protect websites from sudden surges in demand. Cloud’s scalability can equip a website with servers, bandwidth, and storage space to accommodate rapid growth or dearth in attention from visitors. This additional computing power can be purchased a la carte, allowing cloud users to attain only the extra space that they need, without wasting resources on unused storage.

To capitalize on spikiness, and to not be capsized by it, Wimbledon enlisted IBM’s SmartCloud technology. The BBC reports that the servers powering Wimbledon’s own sizable piece of the cloud in fact reside stateside, in North Carolina.

Though Wimbledon’s impressive needs for cloud space will likely consume the majority of the servers’ capacity during the two-week tournament, the All England Lawn Tennis Club can actually relinquish that power, at the tournament’s conclusion, for use by other Events with a Capital E, such as the U.S. Open.

Managing IBM SmartCloud’s use at this year’s Wimbledon are program executives Doug Clark and Alan Flack. These experts have also spearheaded a new initiative for Wimbledon’s web presence this year — a sister channel for the main site, Live @ Wimbledon, consecrated to provide online fans with direct video footage and real-time score tracking from the hottest matches of any given competition day.

As the cloud is now revealing its aptitude for the star-studded tennis championship steeped in history, we can expect a more dynamic relationship between the computing revolution and major competitive contests in the future. Olympics, anyone?

By Jeff Norman

Lessons In Cloud Fail Damage Control

Lessons In Cloud Fail Damage Control

Detractors of cloud computing received unexpected buttresses to their arguments this past weekend, as a pair of noteworthy power failures sent the Internet reeling.

Friday night (June 29), a storm electrified by lightning temporarily wrecked a sizable section of Amazon Web Services’ cloud computing service. AWS’ enormous clientele, of which Netflix, Pinterest, and Instagram shine most brightly, were rendered unavailable for hours on end. Customers utilizing websites and resources powered by AWS were neither provided with sufficient information to comprehend the sudden outage nor reassured that their then inaccessible data would remain protected.

Across the pond, customers of the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) experienced similar panic induced by a failure in late June. RBS, alongside NatWest, complete shut down its capacity to take inbound payments from customers, a failing which has continued linger through to this week. Many of those banking with RBS have been left unable to tender finances needed for expenses like bills and food. Technological errors in RBS’ functionality, stemming from cloud associated infrastructure, instigated the bank’s dilemma. Mirroring the AWS debacle, customers felt deserted without transparency. The distraught mood was intense enough to arouse the BBC’s interest in tracking the carnage.

Rivals of AWS have due cause to hurl the company’s cloud gaffe in its face as a deserved brickbat. And RBS customers are justified in their ire against a bank who ostensibly values data security over transparency with those who fund it. Yet a pause on the anger allows for some rational realizations to surface.

In the case of Amazon Web Services, it’s unlikely that its competitors in storage space outsourcing via the cloud would have been able to complete circumvent the crisis. AWS boasts only one figure at its apex: Jeff Bezos, to whom all staff at work for the company must answer. Other companies feature a group of leaders, which in the event of a cloud-affecting power crisis, a case could result of too many chefs in the kitchen.

As for RBS, a less convoluted and more apologetic mea culpa was in order. Blighted customers instead received a vapid press release. “The need to first establish at what point processing had stopped delayed subsequent batches and created a substantial backlog,” read one of the release’s clearer statements.

Solutions for preventing such incidents in the future continue to remain grim. Interviewed by GigaOM, engineer par excellence Geoff Arnold had this to say about if the IT community could hope of better managing large distributed systems: “I used to think so, but I’m getting more cynical now.”

By Jeff Norman

Sony Wins Cloud Gaming Boost From Gaikai

Sony Wins Cloud Gaming Boost From Gaikai

On July 2, Sony Computer Entertainment (of PlayStation fame) made a delicious tech-forward coup sure to find its virtual entertainment rivals Samsung and LG salivating with envy: the acquisition of Gaikai, the foremost cloud gaming company worldwide.

Gaikai literally translates as “an open ocean” in Japanese. That definition conjures images of vast expanses inviting curious exploration — the same vibrant point of view that spearheaded the cloud computing movement, and that is spurring rapid concomitant change in the video game community via the cloud as well.

Sony Computer Entertainment, or SCE, financed this potentially groundbreaking deal with $380 million, every penny of which is predicated on the hope that SCE can successfully absorb Gaikai’s immersive cloud gaming service into its wide-ranging fold.

SCE brass praised Gaikai’s “technological strength and engineering talent” in an official press release, vital supplies to serve as for fuel for the conglomerate’s aim to stand alone as the preeminent resource for serious gamers. Those starving for a bounty of rich-graphic content that can be accessed on a dime from an internet-capable device.

Yet this deal is far from one-sided in its benefits. Gaikai CEO David Perry ecstatically declared his thrill at being now intimately associated with the gargantuan PlayStation brand, as well as with the opportunity to “dramatically improve the reach of existing content” as the clout of cloud gaming accrues wholesale.

Gaikai was established by Perry in 2008 and headquartered in Aliso Viejo, California — interestingly located in the state’s Orange County, not the better known Silicon Valley. The company considers itself a technology in and of itself, one that liberates game lovers to instantly play some of the industry’s most coveted titles on any device wired for the cloud. Downloading or installation is unneeded. Gaikai also grants video game publishers opportunities to produce and distribute their own material through its own open cloud platform.

Diehard gamers shouldn’t jettison their physical consoles just yet, despite this auspicious news. As the recent U.S. East Coast power crisis demonstrated, the consistent reliability of cloud computing remains vulnerable to weather-borne power outages. Fifa Soccer ’12 and Rayman Origins, two of Gaikai’s most popular offerings, may dip in the pleasure they offer when down on the cloud. And if SCE were to release a blockbuster game title exclusively on the cloud, anticipate vocal Bedlam from the gaming community’s most passionate and persnickety members, should access to that title falter.

Whether SCE’s cloud ambitions result in just another Hulu or something more dominant and substantial remains to be seen. Nevertheless, SCE’s subsumption of Gaikai stands as a breathtaking vote of confidence in cloud gaming’s long-term viability and promise.  Indeed, such a major acquisition performed by a flagship corporate could exert serious ramifications for cloud computing as a whole throughout the entertainment industry.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud India: The Litmus Test

Cloud India: The Litmus Test

Lap up your plate of lamb vindaloo, wrap up your daydream of spartan ashram living, scroll past the Bollywood-lite selections on Netflix (“Slumdog,” “Bend It Like Beckham”), and you will locate a culture whose viewpoint on innovation rivals America’s values of commerce and democracy. In India, every new technology must pass a litmus test of both usefulness and affordability. Cloud computing beautifully fits this bill. Allowing businesses to sidestep the need to establish a standalone IT infrastructure and employees, cloud is quickly becoming the ingredient of choice with which Indian professionals spice their ventures.

Both low cost of ownership and high return on investment are requirements of successful Indian business endeavors; the country’s globally blooming economy has seen a meadow’s worth of companies of all sizes flower, resulting in much stiffer competition. Cloud computing is enabling the small and midsize businesses of India to more effectively manage their customer bases while at the same time comply with the increasingly taut regulatory demands that are sweeping across the country (i.e., transparency of regulations and utilizing central business procedure).

Outsourcing — the watchword of Indian contributions to the international tech conversation. Since the late 1990s, India has spearheaded and dominating the outsourcing industry, which leads to yet another superlative for cloud computing in the culture. Cloud essentially outsources the demands of several key components to any business: a workplace, data servers, desktops, even an IT staff. India’s expansive and rich size as a country and population make the nation a natural to adopt cloud’s ability to boost remote collaboration and augmented efficiency via real-time mobile communication and interaction.

Examples of Indian companies who have adopted cloud computing to winning effect include Netmagic Solutions, one of the country’s leading data center operators; Ogilvy India, a media company that runs several internet campaigns on cloud; and Indus Valley Partners, a New York / New Delhi / Mumbai consultancy firm entirely run on the cloud-based Google Apps. The Times of India elaborates on these businesses benefiting from cloud and several more.

Though cloud computing has already demonstrated much ideological promise in India, its practical application to on-site businesses there has not yet fully taken root. Cloud City, the web-journal feature of tech site Silicon India, reports that “companies [in the country] are still not extracting the true promise of cloud.” A movement to expedite this process has begun, fortunately, with the Cloud Computing World Forum to take place in Mumbai this October. Luminaries such as Rajaashkar Getty (Jetair) and Nandkishor Dhomne (CIO of Manipal Health) have arranged to appear and speak as well.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Helps Europe's Small Biz Smash The Economy

Cloud Helps Europe’s Small Biz Smash the Economy

The tribulation of the European economy has sunk dramatically enough to warrant the front page of even American financial headlines. Yet in the face of such widespread woe has arisen a new population of pliable SMEs, or small- or medium-sized enterprises, throughout the continent. Cloud computing has reinvigorated the SME set, particularly those with a small staff, with its simplicity of use, speedy implementation, and a cost-effective scalability that makes traditional server solutions seem arthritic and old hat. Cloud is also reducing their costs of operation by an attractive range — by up to 20% according to surveys appearing in a recent Guardian article.

This boon in cloud’s popularity with the small business set contrasts with the regulatory difficulties for which Europe has become infamous. Privacy laws and country-to-country restrictions have coupled with lingering concerns regarding data protection to retard the process of integrating cloud into European business by two years, according to the piece.

This optimism in Europe’s SMEs must stem from a firm belief in cloud’s propensity to elevate the scale of their presence and effectiveness to those of the continent’s larger and more powerful enterprises. Cloud’s benefits democratize the business landscape and beef up peewee business endeavors. Europe’s stubborn frigidity regarding cloud will inevitably thaw in the face of its SME’s craving for the technology.

Yet the benefits of cloud, which outweigh Europe’s leery treatment of it, do not benefit the SMEs alone. As the Guardian article explains, “Small businesses are the lifeblood of Europe’s economic engine,” comprising two-thirds of Europe’s private sector. If cloud can potentially improve two-thirds of Europe’s business power, the economy as a whole cannot help but regain health massively.

Doubters and detractors are encouraged to watch this short CNN interview with Microsoft International president Jean-Philippe Courtois, who clarifies better than anyone the precise reasons why Europe needs cloud yesterday. Titled “How the ‘Cloud’ Could Save Europe,” Courtois coolly states that: “SMEs need only pay a few euros a month to use cloud services and be visible on the Web, be more efficient, and compete with big global players. This makes change particularly in countries where recession is pretty tough. [Europe’s] concept of the single market needs to grow into a single digital market [via cloud computing], where you can make goods, products, and services flow across boundaries in a secure way, with one common policy across Europe. That will help Europe compete with Asia.” To outline: recovery from tough economic recession, the chance to play catch-up with the Asian market, for just a few monthly euros? ‘Nuff said.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Business 101: Storing The Data

Cloud Business 101: Storing The Data

You’re new to CloudTweaks — to cloud computing, for that matter — and you want a quick, simple way into the tech trend right now. Well you’ve got it, cloud-curious businessperson. Here’s a primer on how the cloud benefits businesses new and old, small and large.

Cloud computing launches new businesses more quickly with greater efficiency. This technology virtually eliminates the need to install new software or download it anew elsewhere, as all of a company’s vital applications can be immediately accessed via the cloud. There is no cap on virtual storage space within the cloud either, especially when compared to the traditional storage model of physical servers (the use of which is growing more antiquated by the day, by the way). Augment your cloud storage in a snap with the payment of a relatively frugal fee.

ADVANTAGE: Storing the data for your business on the cloud allows for it to be accessed with ease by any member of your team, slashing communication delays and eradicating the need to physically work together — a boon for well-qualified business aspirants who are always on the go.

It is this ease of access which translates into productivity at a distance, an essential value for many businesses — and SMBs in particular. Utilizing applications in the cloud allows individuals or teams, physically separated, to collaborate as an ensemble, working together on documents sans pesky e-mail attachments or exchanging status updates and feedback no matter where they are.

ADVANTAGE: Dynamic Internet conferencing, professional instant messaging, virtual meetings with clients old or new: these are three of cloud’s specialties for businesses, means of communication that can spur an improvement in how a business pursues and capitalizes on fresh ventures.

Cloud computing lessens the grip of a less-than-ideal economy on thrifty businesses who need to economize. The storage scalability inherent to cloud provides a twofold advantage: businesses need only purchase those applications most needed (a la carte, if you will), and the burden of buying bulky unused storage space along with those applications becomes a thing of the past. Both of these mean cost savings upfront. What is more, several of the most valuable cloud applications can be sampled in their “personal customer” modes for free, such as Dropbox, HootSuite, and Mail Chimp.

ADVANTAGE: In-house server upkeep spending nosedives — or disappears — with use of cloud computing. This “pay as you go” concept applies to several facets of a business, from its desktops (SaaS applications) to company mobile devices.

By Jeff Norman

No More Cloud Delusions!

No More Cloud Delusions!

I am sick and tired of the myriad cloud urban myths that run amok both in and outside of the IT community. One by one, I’d like to dismantle three of my biggest pet-peeve cloud delusions.

Let’s begin with one of the more attractive and “boho-chic” cloud tall tales that never fails to spur lively debate between dissidents and optimists: the idea that the cloud is “green,” or environmentally sustainable and advantageous. Don’t think so! The energy that powers the data centers that themselves power the very notion of cloud computing derives from the same resources that fuel any other electrical output. Obviously, energy in America remains highly contentious. And although the country has come a long way in concentrating on renewable sources, coal and oil still outrank solar, hydroelectric, or other sustainable options.

Google recently announced its support of the notion that cloud can equal greenness, as Wired Cloudline efficiently explores. But Greenpeace protests continue to reinforce the veracity of cloud computing’s compelling need to improve in this area, not bask in ostensible (and still nascent) sustainability supremacy.

We now return to an old chestnut in the cloud delusion conversation: that it lags behind other technologies in terms of security and data protection. Let it go, people! Cloud is inherently just as secure — and insecure — as literally any other computing option out there, and that’s the truth. We acknowledge that the cloud can attract threats due to its fewer yet more intensely utilized data centers. However, the very fact that cloud’s data centers are so efficient and high-powered encourages vigilant upkeep and maintenance regarding them, keeping their data even more protected. Security remains a vital concern in cloud computing, to be sure. But instead of canvassing the myth of its poor security, there ought to be deeper communication between cloud’s clients and vendors on ensuring that data centers are water-tight.

Arguably the most agonizing and pervasive cloud wive’s tale remains the widely held belief that cloud computing will instantly provide a huge financial slim-down for ANYONE who decides to take it up. Wrong! Although cloud computing can help to realign and streamline an organization’s technological existence, that optimization of resources does not necessarily (or automatically) create an economical advantage. Yes, cloud’s scale-ability does allow companies to save money by paying exclusively for the precise data servers required at any specific moment in time. But a business would have to severely reduce its own computing needs for cloud computing to force a reduction in its IT budget.

By no means is this trio — green, security, and money savings — the only group of cloud computing fables that irk me. I’ll tackle more in the future. Which of these three is, in your opinion, the most likely to be believed, no matter what I’ve argued?

By Jeff Norman

CloudTweaks Comics
The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Imagine this:  Your wearable device is subpoenaed to testify against you.  You were driving when you were over the legal alcohol limit and data from a smart Breathalyzer device is used against you. Some might argue that such a use case could potentially safeguard society. However, it poses…

Cloud Infographic – Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences

Cloud Infographic – Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences

Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences Many people have heard of cloud computing. There is however a tremendous number of people who still cannot differentiate between Public, Private & Hybrid cloud offerings.  Here is an excellent infographic provided by the group at iWeb which goes into greater detail on this subject. Infographic source: iWeb

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

Ambitious Startups An oft-quoted statistic, 50% of new businesses fail within five years. And the culling of startups is even more dramatic, with an estimated nine out of ten folding. But to quote Steve Jobs, “I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.” So while…

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Off Premise Corporate Data Storage Cloud storage is a broad term. It can encompass anything from on premise solutions, to file storage, disaster recovery and off premise options. To narrow the scope, I’ve dedicated the focus of today’s discussion to the more popular cloud storage services—such as Dropbox, Box, OneDrive—which are also known as hosted,…

Cloud Infographic: The Explosive Growth Of The Cloud

Cloud Infographic: The Explosive Growth Of The Cloud

The Explosive Growth Of The Cloud We’ve been covering cloud computing extensively over the past number of years on CloudTweaks and have truly enjoyed watching the adoption and growth of it. Many novices are still trying to wrap their mind around what the cloud it is and what it does, while others such as thought…

Report: Enterprise Cloud Computing Moves Into Mature Growth Phase

Report: Enterprise Cloud Computing Moves Into Mature Growth Phase

Verizon Cloud Report Enterprises using the cloud, even for mission-critical projects, is no longer new or unusual. It’s now firmly established as a reliable workhorse for an organization and one that can deliver great value and drive transformation. That’s according to a new report from Verizon entitled “State of the Market: Enterprise Cloud 2016.” which…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Disaster Recovery – A Thing Of The Past!

Disaster Recovery – A Thing Of The Past!

Disaster Recovery  Ok, ok – I understand most of you are saying disaster recovery (DR) is still a critical aspect of running any type of operations. After all – we need to secure our future operations in case of disaster. Sure – that is still the case but things are changing – fast. There are…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…