Author Archives: Jeff Norman

I Like the Way You Move: A Boom in the Mobile Cloud

A Boom in the Mobile Cloud

Surmounting the economic challenges of 2011, cloud computing emerged as a new technological force to be reckoned with. The New Year has already announced additional strength for the cloud, particularly in the mobile phone sector.

Several major tech junkets predicted cloud computing’s push into society’s cell phones and mobile devices — predictions that I did not wholeheartedly believe.

The cloud’s flagship asset of storing and updating important data in multiple locations simultaneously is simple enough to grasp. However, most major companies have failed to communicate just how simple and useful cloud computing can actually prove to be for consumers. The general public, at least from my perspective, regards the cloud with either confusion or security-concerned contempt.

And then Apple launched their ridiculously attractive commercial for the iCloud this January. The ad makes it very clear that what a user downloads with her laptop will instantly transfer in its entirety to her smartphone, and vice versa. Apple’s elegant handling of the cloud clarifies its assets for average folks without deigning to dumb down the content.

This intelligent move has cemented Apple and iCloud at the vanguard of the reach for consumers and mobile technology. It now behooves me to admit that cloud computing will slowly but surely saturate cell phone / smartphone use throughout the year. And some research indicates that Apple won’t be alone in navigating just exactly how, and how well, mobile phone users absorb the cloud.

T-Mobile, to be fair, actually frolicked in the cloud long before the technology became all the rage. The company’s mobile devices have long featured the MobileLife Album, which has granted users the freedom to back up their pics with separate yet space-free storage. T-Mobile interestingly did not label this technology as “the cloud” or any other close synonym. But if it walks like a duck, and talks like a duck…

Microsoft’s Skydrive and Dropbox, among the best known cloud applications around, are anticipated to expand their distribution into the mobile device realm as well this year. Cloud computing folk should also keep an eye out for the rise of MNOs, or “mobile network operators,” such as Verizon and AT&T, into the cloud application sector as well. Big honcho companies like these are realizing that the cloud is trending with mobile phone users who desire heightened ease of use and more malleable access to their data.

Clever admen as hired by Apple and T-Mobile are simply tapping into this already-existent embrace of cloud computing. Their brilliance manifests in how smoothly they sugarcoat cloud computing’s complexities as clear advantages for average people who want above-average phones.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Apps of the Week: Spoon

Cloud Apps of the Week

Major cloud gaming platform OnLive is stretching out of its interactive video background and into competitive pool of applications designed for the iPad. Its freshly released app, entitled OnLive Desktop, will enable users to use their laptops’ system of Windows 7 directly on their tablet screen. In short, the entire suite of Microsoft Office programs, including Word, PowerPoint, and Media Player, can be accessed via OnLive’s app through the iPad. Those who download the app, free of purchase on iTunes app store as of last Thursday, are privy to an inviting 2GB of free storage space in the cloud for their Microsoft documents. Additional space — up to 50GB — will be made available for $10 monthly. OnLive’s clever application could potentially pose a threat to Google’s array of cloud-ready offerings, like Docs and Calendar, that sought to supplant Microsoft’s package as the go-to’s for on-the-go consumers.

Music lovers who wish that online radio stations would play their own already purchased hit tracks should easily gravitate to Audiobox.fm, released to a fair wave of acclaim in 2010. Amid a flurry of existent cloud applications that look to attract music fans, Audiobox stands out by not only storing users’ music on the cloud, but also by playing that music on every device the user may own, via Audiobox’s custom player. AudioMashes is what distinguishes the 2012 version of Audiobox: it connects the music player with Dropbox, Twitter, Gigjunkie, and the like. Best of all, users need to download no software to access these features. The application charges its users only $4 a month to warehouse their tracks in the cloud.

The makers of Spoon have determined to advertise it as more than just an app. Visitors to its website will see Spoon instead presented as app virtualization, or technology that (similarly to OnLive Desktop) opens the applications of a user’s desktop onto a given device. Unlike OnLive’s offering, Spoon can launch an array of applications both common and rare, from Google Chrome to PuTTY. Helpfully, Spoon backs up files stored on a desktop automatically to the cloud. Spoon also allows users to synchronize their files and applications by selecting the desired files and dropping them onto Spoon’s clearly visible control panel. A download of a small plugin is necessary to wield Spoon’s features, available for free with up to 100MB of storage. Up to 100GB is available for more active users, starting at $8 a month.

By Jeff Norman

The Cloud, Our Kids, and Colleges: Grown Ups Should Take Notes

The Cloud, Our Kids, and Colleges: Grown Ups Should Take Notes

The Cloud, Our Kids, and Colleges

Over history, technology repeatedly seems to embrace the young. The older members of society either reject the newfangled whiz-gangs or work hard to incorporate it into their already structured lives. Those born in the 1980s were the first to grow up with a computer; 1990s babies are learning times-tables while they hold down social networking accounts. Cloud computing has already begun to ingratiate itself with the next generation. While the cloud continues to stump many old-timers, children benefit from a supple mind which lets them elegantly absorb what it all means. A video released by Accenture drives this point home, featuring 10 year-olds explicating what is meant by cloud computing with aplomb.

I don’t know if there are limits,” imagines one freakishly insightful girl in the previously mentioned video. Growing up in this technologically astute way, these children will always associate a tweet with a small hashtagged message before it reminds them of a songbird’s cry. They will also expect their education to keep pace with their grasp of technology and to reflect that maintenance of trend in as many facets as possible. To that end, universities have wised up to the value and necessity of moving into the cloud immediately and completely. A recent Guardian article revealed higher education’s willingness to embrace the cloud, and not solely as preparation for a new crop kids coming to campus anticipating it.

The most visible benefit the cloud offers to universities, as the article’s roundtable of technology-in-education experts clarify, is the reduced cost and increased ease and flexibility of establishing a collective infrastructure between individual campuses. Cloud computing substantially lessens what it costs to mount a brand-new interconnected framework, simplifying the process of mounting computer systems for research projects and college classes reliant on a quick burst of computing wizardry. The Guardian piece reveals a fissure between campuses in America and those across the pond, however.

Whereas British universities have expressed reluctance to fully integrate into the cloud — likely due to a commitment to uphold independence in university structures — American colleges like Stanford and MIT, progressive to a fault, already offer courses on the cloud, and have staged venture labs on ways to include it into their daily operations.

Clearly, the already cloud-adroit youngsters of today will experience a dynamic interaction with such universities, particularly who most warmly embrace the technology. Higher learning will definitely attract these kids, who’ll see college as a way to deepen their knowledge, not only on cloud computing, but of whatever may be the latest tech status quo of the moment.

At the same time, these kids eventually sidestepping the formal education system, a la Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, would not at all surprise me. The cloud itself is the best metaphor for power of these children’s brains: limitless and impressive indeed, which higher ed ought to work hard to accommodate asap.

We should all take lessons from the ten year-olds out there, with wit beyond their years. They know better than we do that cloud computing is a continuous learning experience in itself. Grasping the cloud’s ABCs are essential for those who wish to remain relevant into futurity. And to keep up with the smart kids.

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Apps of the Week: Google Music

Cloud Apps of the Week: Google Music

Google Music

The New York Times has proclaimed Google Music as one of the best cloud applications released for Android phone devices last year. That the music service is offered free of charge helps explain its selection, and also locates Google Music right at home among the other applications in the Google family, all available gratis (GMail, Google Docs, et cetera). But like those other apps, comprehensive features also distinguish Google Music: users can transfer 20,000 of their tracks to the cloud via the app, which also immediately and wirelessly synchronizes what they upload to their Android. Google Music’s mammoth-sized music storage capacity dwarfs that of main competitors Amazon Cloud Drive and iCloud. What’s more, Google Music struck an enviable deal with the Android Market; through this e-marketplace, users can profit from hundreds of prime tracks to download — at no cost, of course.

SugarSync is sweetening the pot when it comes to multiple device alignment. The application keeps users in short reach of every file and document from any location or device. Many similar applications house users’ files neatly as well, but SugarSync goes the extra mile by further backing up each document online. This characteristic upstages archrival Dropbox, where a user must remember to upload a file if she’d like to find it there. SugarSync’s designers clearly intended to infuse a jack-of-all-trades aesthetic into the application; it doubles as a music streamer, a mobile app (available on everything from BlackBerry to Symbian), and a polyglot (usable in Chinese, Spanish, German, and Japanese). At as little as $5 monthly (after a month-long free trial), this “Renaissance Man” app is a multifaceted steal.

“Assembly-line” style personalization, three-dimensional design, and the beauty of ceramics intertwine in Sculpteos 3D Printing Design Maker, the perfect application for the trendy potter in your life. The process begins with a photo or portrait of the user, or of a friend, taken and available on the user’s iPad. That user uploads the pic to Sculpteo’s cloud storage system. The company’s revolutionary 3D print technology transforms the photograph into a ceramic vase, plate, mug, or the like. In addition to cloud computing, Scupteo’s application makes equally clever use of what VentureBeat terms “mass customization,” in which manufacturers utilize mass production schemes to tailor an item to an individual consumer. Scupteo’s courted top-notch artists to develop new ways of using the ceramics application to further enmesh consumers into the design process. The tailor-made ceramics begin at $70 an item.

By Jeff Norman

Put A Clamp On Cloud Music? Village Voice Insists Yes

Put A Clamp On Cloud Music? Village Voice Insists Yes

Put A Clamp on Cloud Music? Village Voice Insists Yes

Music writers have rung in the New Year with cloud complaints.

A recent edition of New York City’s “Village Voice,” America’s largest weekly newspaper, finds head music columnist Maura Johnston picking away at premium music-listening services for the dearth in their artistic content. Her article, “New Year, New Rules,” advises readers on several cogent ways to improve their appreciation of fine music in 2012. Among her recommendations is to refrain from the cloud as a source of comprehensive music listening.

hipsters-the-world-tourJohnston specifically maligns Spotify, one of the most popular streaming music providers in the cloud. She claims that it offers an “illusion of completeness” that is only revealed when searching for an obscure track, such as “Caramel’s ‘My Tailor is Rich,’ [released by] microlabel Harriet Records in 1996.”

I concede that, by pinpointing the lack of completeness in song availability, Johnston has correctly identified a notable annoyance in cloud music apps. True, these apps function on popularity: you’re more likely to find the full track listing of a Rihanna album in the cloud than a single song from Caramel or from Jonathan Batiste, an up-and-coming jazz musician also featured in the “Village Voice” that week.

However, Johnston doesn’t consider the full arc of her critique on cloud music. Finding obscure tracks to obsess over is a key element of any hipster music lover’s modus operandi, and it’s likely that Johnston has tailored her article to these extreme, slightly snooty readers — all too prevalent in New York City. But just because finding the latest indie hidden treasure on Spotify isn’t easy doesn’t mean that locating an unsung composition from Beethoven or Louis Armstrong or Fleetwood Mac will be any simply either. The cloud brims with music choices. But not every music choice can be found on the cloud.

Johnston claims that “crappy payouts” and “anti-digital” elitism are two primary reasons why current musicians and bands fail to upload their music to the cloud. Speaking of older music, Johnston believes that because rare tracks don’t appear “on Spotify,” they don’t appear on the Internet, which essentially means they “don’t exist.”

Rubbish! Instead of directing her readers away from the cloud, Johnston ought to have leveled with them. Yes, the cloud can’t contain every musical trifle. But a number of outstanding music apps other than Spotify can significantly improve a music connoisseur’s experience of the cloud.

Applications such as iCloud, Subsonic, and mSpot allow music lovers to curate their own listening: they stream tracks from a user’s own music collection to an array of devices, from a desktop computer or laptop to an iPhone or Android.

Grooveshark has long been a favorite cloud application for those dyed-in-the-wool music aficionados who crave access to a near-infinite range of songs, running the continuum from ubiquitous pop radio hits to esoteric little gems and bootlegs known only to indie/rap/jazz cognoscenti.

Musicians or bands irritated by the cloud’s acknowledged lack of complete control might find their distaste reversed with nifty cloud applications like SoundCloud’s Music XRay, which directly bridges artists to professional industry contacts, and ReverbNation’s Control Room, which pools info on fans and updates them on new releases and gigs.

I agree with Johnston that the cloud isn’t perfect. But abstinence ain’t answer. I cede the floor to the Beatles, who best summarize what’s happening with music in the cloud right now. “You have to admit it’s getting better. Getting better all the time.”

(Infographic Source: http://www.movehub.com)

By Jeff Norman

Cloud Apps of the Week

Cloud Apps of the Week

Cloud Apps of the Week

You’ve successfully rung in 2012, but if you’re in the United States — particularly on the East Coast — a nasty cold spell has put an abrupt end to the celebration. Thankfully, three new applications should warm your spirits once more, with their clever grasp on how the cloud can prove useful in 2012.

Oftentimes, cloud applications seem more concerned with demonstrating impressive “cloud-ness” instead of creating an ingenious spin on a specific niche.

A new woodworking app, called “dustCut” from Online Softworx, dodges this trend. It keeps the emphasis on the lumber without feeling technologically labored, and it proves how well the cloud can adapt to a very particular sector: carpenters and cabinetmakers. dustCut determines the least amount of money and labor required to manufacture a set of rectangular panelings. Deceptively simple, this standard woodcutting practice has vexed the IT world and business scholars for years, verifying dustCut’s helpfulness for those who work with wood. Currently free, Online Softworx offers unlimited use of the dustCut’s premium features for a fair, pay-as-you-go fee.

Applications focused on photo editing already abound. Such apps that also integrate cloud computing are substantially rarer, paving the way for Picnik to dominate. Founded in September of 2007, Picnik merges a photo editing app’s expectations of remarkable tools and effects with the cloud’s ease of data storage and access. Users can employ Picnik’s array of editing equipment for free; they can also import their favorite pictures from a host of popular photo storage sites, including Facebook, Picasa, and Flickr, as well as from their own computers or laptops. To entice diehard shutterbugs, Picnik offers several premium features at the cost of $25 annually.

We can only hope that no new social media platform emerges in 2012. Juggling accounts on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, WordPress, and onwards challenged many of us — but not everyone — last year. Those that navigated every facet of their social network experiences with aplomb likely had HootSuite in their corner. This application synchronizes your activity on each of your networks with a single click.

Multiple network management is not inventing the wheel, however, a fact not overlooked by HootSuite’s staff, who has beefed up the app’s offerings with an armada of additional features: custom analytics and team collaboration for businesses and new support for smartphones (Blackberry, Android, iPhone, etc.) are some of the standouts. $6 a month to access all of HootSuite’s features also makes it one of the best values in the cloud app community.

By Jeff Norman

Where The Cloud Will Grow in 2012: Look Back at 2011

Where The Cloud Will Grow in 2012: Look Back at 2011

2012 is still newborn. But the year holds much promise for cloud computing’s ascendancy in the public’s regard and in the business world’s harnessing of its assets. Looking back at 2011 sheds light on three areas where progress might be made this year: open source platforms, the cloud as a force in popular electronics, and government interest in cloud computing.

The first landmark event of last year arguably took place in May, when IaaS platform Project Olympus was mounted by mobile business cloud company Citrix. Designed to serve as Citrix’s stab at distributing an open source platform, Project Olympus was made available for IT consumers eager to furnish their own spaces in the cloud, either public or private. Olympus functions by harnessing the code from flagship operating system OpenStack, which had been in development since summer 2010 — a collaboration between NASA and Rackspace. Project Olympus, however, stands out as the very first commercialized distribution of OpenStack’s ample resource aimed squarely at large enterprises.

The summer of 2011 was set ablaze by the unveiling of Apple’s iCloud in June. The late Steve Jobs revolutionized consumer electronics by marrying artful craftsmanship with technological brilliance; the iCloud promised to do the same for cloud computing, improving its palatability with a still somewhat distrustful public. iCloud essentially coordinates a user’s experience in every Apple product or software, from the iPad to the iPod, creating a unified harmony between each device the user owns. Delivering his keynote address at the Apple Worldwide Developer’s Conference, Steve Jobs further piqued the crowd’s interest with a strong proclamation: “the iCloud will demote the PC and Mac to being a device.”

The government began to wade into the cloud noticeably as well last year. Its biggest stride yet occurred last August, when Amazon WebServices announced its release of GovCloud, a private cloud service for governmental agencies. The move surprised many, as few believed that the government would put up with the less-than-watertight security potential that the cloud had been known for. Amazon allayed Capitol Hill’s fears with an upgrade in how rigorously GovCloud would maintain informational security. The cloud service was designed to adhere to meticulous regulatory mandates, such as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations and PCI DSS Level One. GovCloud’s progress with Washington’s agencies was seen as a case study for other daring cloud endeavors in the public sector.

How exactly will the cloud shape 2012, from consumer products to Capitol Hlll? Look to CloudTweaks all year long to keep you in the know, first and best.

By Jeff Norman

2012 and the Cloud: Computing Wonders That Won’t Cease

2012 and the Cloud: Computing Wonders That Won’t Cease

2011 wraps up in mere days now. We’re well aware of CloudTweaks’ readers’ hunger to get the scoop on what’s to come for the cloud in the New Year. But only vetted psychics can divine the future with truly reliable accuracy, and cloud computing has yet to invent a custom-made crystal ball. That said, our finger on technology’s pulse has led us to expect more of one truly good thing for the cloud: positive attention, and an increase in cloud converts who sing its praises with word of mouth. We’d like to present our pair of prognostications on how exactly the wave of strong publicity will crest, beginning with news from one of cloud computing’s foremost companies, Apple.

Apple Will Still Inspire

Infoboom recently reported on the rousing success of Apple’s Mac Application store, which just completed its first year of sales. 100 million applications sold in only twelve months is an unignorable figure, one whose impact will ramify throughout 2012.

To be fair, Apple has remained mum on several key details; the precise number of applications made available for purchase is unknown, as is the mean payment required for each application. That the Mac App store also served as home to the opening of the massively popular Mac Lion OS leads us to suspect some embellishment of that 100-million figure.

Nevertheless, Apple stands at the helm of translating the sometimes unwieldy nature of cloud computing into efficiency and usefulness that customers crave. We anticipate dozens of companies to emulate Apple’s classic cloud model, which hinges on not only the Mac App outlet, but also the iCloud — the most fully realized and successful cloud device to date.

The Cloud Will Spur American Business

2012 could also see cloud computing redefine America’s business landscape. As we plunge more deeply into the second decade of the new millennium, technology has grown more orderly and sophisticated, no longer the open frontier it seemed to be in decades prior.

As a result, businesses are demanding a greater focus on their structural development as opposed to whiz-bang applications and attractive effects. Business heads have cited the importance of cloud computing in allowing them to concentrate more thoroughly on innovation and maneuvering the company forward.

As Forbes deftly pointed out this week, new jobs in both IT and management will be grounded in cloud expertise. The increase in reverence for the cloud will also spawn new positions like cloud architects and software designers. Those who can flaunt cloud computing excellence on their resume will find 2012 a happy year for solid employment.

By Jeff Norman

CloudTweaks Comics
Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy A few weeks ago I visited the global headquarters of a large multi-national company to discuss cloud strategy with the CIO. I arrived 30 minutes early and took a tour of the area where the marketing team showcased their award winning brands. I was impressed by the digital marketing strategy…

Cloud Computing – A Requirement For Greater Innovation

Cloud Computing – A Requirement For Greater Innovation

Cloud Computing Innovation Sao Paulo, Brazil has had trouble with both energy and water supplies as of late. Despite it is the rainy period. Unfortunately Sao Paulo is very dependent on its rain as a majority of its power is generated from large dams. No water, no energy. Difficult situation for a city of some…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

The Big Data Movement Gets Bigger

The Big Data Movement Gets Bigger

The Big Data Movement In recent years, Big Data and Cloud relations have been growing steadily. And while there have been many questions raised around how best to use the information being gathered, there is no question that there is a real future between the two. The growing importance of Big Data Scientists and the…

4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

Understanding the “Insider Threat”  The revelations that last month’s Sony hack was likely caused by a disgruntled former employee have put a renewed spotlight on the insider threat. The insider threat first received attention after Edward Snowden began to release all sorts of confidential information regarding national security. While many called him a hero, what…

Are Women Discriminated Against In The Tech Sector?

Are Women Discriminated Against In The Tech Sector?

Women Discriminated Against In Tech Sector It is no secret that the tech industry is considered sexist since most women are paid less than men; there are considerably fewer women in tech jobs; and generally men get promoted above women. Yet the irony is twofold. Firstly, there is an enormous demand for employees with skills…

Report: Enterprise Cloud Computing Moves Into Mature Growth Phase

Report: Enterprise Cloud Computing Moves Into Mature Growth Phase

Verizon Cloud Report Enterprises using the cloud, even for mission-critical projects, is no longer new or unusual. It’s now firmly established as a reliable workhorse for an organization and one that can deliver great value and drive transformation. That’s according to a new report from Verizon entitled “State of the Market: Enterprise Cloud 2016.” which…

5 Predictions For Education Technology

5 Predictions For Education Technology

Education Technology Although technology has fast influenced most sectors of our world, education is an area that’s lagged behind. Many classrooms still employ the one-to-many lecturing model wherein the average student is catered for while a few are left behind, and others bored. Recently, there’s been a drive to uncover how to use technology successfully…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

Box.net, Amazon Cloud Drive The online (or cloud) storage business has always been a really interesting industry. When we started Box in 2005, it was a somewhat untouchable category of technology, perceived to be a commodity service with low margins and little consumer willingness to pay. All three of these factors remain today, but with…

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy A few weeks ago I visited the global headquarters of a large multi-national company to discuss cloud strategy with the CIO. I arrived 30 minutes early and took a tour of the area where the marketing team showcased their award winning brands. I was impressed by the digital marketing strategy…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Cloud Architecture These days, Multi-Tier Applications are the norm. From SharePoint’s front-end/back-end configuration, to LAMP-based websites using multiple servers to handle different functions, a multitude of apps require public and private-facing components to work in tandem. Placing these apps in entirely public-facing platforms and networks simplifies the process, but at the cost of security vulnerabilities. Locating everything…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…