Author Archives: John

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Traditionally, campuses would vaunt thousands of cell phone sets with equivalent switchboards and Iowa University has not been an exception to the rule, with its eight thousand handsets. Now, courtesy of cloud infrastructure that is creeping into its communication system, the institution of higher learning has a one-month marathon of trading old phones for VoIP-enabled devices. This means reducing the communication expenditure by six hundred thousand dollars per annum. This will also improve the way phone communication becomes an integral part of a larger network rather than just meaning a single device per office.

How the VoIP will Work

The university intends to replace telephone machines on the racks and bring in the cheaper yet efficient cloud calling system. The first advantage of the system is that it will forward, on an automated basis, calls to mobile devices of the staff. This will reduce the costly switchboard system of referencing with an operator. Secondly, the platform will upgrade the sketchy nucleus of communication in the campus. It will bring up a central calling ‘fabric’ as the management is referring to the platform. This will be the start of an integral web-based learning system which relies on one-on-one video or telephony connections.

VOIP

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Apparently, this will also be the beginning of overboard communication network with other campuses, courtesy of the cloud Internet provider that the university has hired for the transition job. The online company serves a consortium of two hundred and twenty United States’ institutions of higher learning, and tens of state-based and federal companies. Thus, the will oversee the embracing of not only an advanced communication system but one that brings in the community around, automatically.

The replacement, so far, is going ahead of its feasibility period. Though Iowa campus intends to swap the systems at a thousand handsets, each seven days, as of June 17, it has nevertheless already replaced more than that number for the cloud system. This would mean that it is likely that the new framework will soon be in use.

Though there will be an installation phase of Internet cables throughout the campus, it is through the magic of technology that this development will not have an effect on wireless installations in the halls of residence. Usually, many campuses around the United States allow uncharged internet on boarding rooms where the learners can use their phones to make calls over the web. The company at the center of the transfer will use its technical expertise to overcome interference hitches that can botch up existing communication lines.

The Iowa example is a brilliant manifestation of how Internet and cloud-based communication channels are rapidly taking over the traditional threshold of the telephone. Now, transitioning between a cell phone and the web during a voice call is an automatic function that requires no troubleshooting. The cloud aspect means more institutions and community centers can exchange data over the interconnected line without resulting to handsets on desks. Cloud systems where a single university offers its library database to a consortium of neighboring campuses has been in vogue in the US for the last decade. This is after the integration of VoIP, cloud servers and campus databases to facilitate library information at cheap rates, with 24/7 access.

By John Omwamba

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

During the TedGlobal meeting that took place in Scotland in mid-June, it came out that the cloud system of education may be here to stay. This is after a professor who founded the initial unilateral cloud educational institutions in the world outlined his plans for a new financial award he has received from a Los Angeles tech group that has recognized his efforts. For Sugata Mitra, who lectures in the coal-rich region of the United Kingdom, learning, as a rule, has not altered for the past half a millennium and it was time cloud gave it the fifth gear up.education-security

The Cloud School

Prof. Mitra has set up a quintet of such virtual educational institutions, a trio of which is in the Indian subcontinent and a dual in England. There is also a plethora of campuses around the planet that are taking his lead by using his software infrastructure to deliver seamless teaching with little tutorial interference other than a rare moderator. This reinforces the professor’s theory that the premise of the cloud educational point is to bequeath pupils a level of self-comprehension. This, in turn, eschews the traditional drawback of digesting what tutors instruct students.

One of the educational facilities that the icon of cloud schooling is concentrating on is in one of the hidden villages of the Indian subcontinent. This will be an offshoot of the 1 million-dollar award that he received in early 2013 to help finance his educational endeavors. According to him, the learning facility will stage a modern journey for the children of the poor regions of eastern India who will, for the first time, compete with their global peers.

A Visual Picture of a Cloud School

Far from common conceptions of what an educational institution looks like, the new cloud schools that are in the offing will resemble cyber pods. It will be an all-pane computer lab that will feature a single giant screen, to one side, to give the moderator a chance to feed in directly with a learner who wants assistance. This will happen through video-phone technology that is already available on the PC for free.

The moderator community will emanate from already advanced tutors online. There is already a platform that has been providing teaching assistance in both India and the United Kingdom that will chip in to help launch the new educational scheme. This, therefore, would seem to eradicate a start without human resource as happens in many capital-intensive projects.

Drive

The major drive of this cloud computing education system is to enhance the self-cognitive faculties of kids. They will become better organized.

Still, there will not be a dearth of the communal factor that enriches modern brick-and-mortar education. In lieu of letting pupils become islands unto themselves, the professor has already drawn a communal model for the Indian system. This will be the introduction of services by clubs for young people. Though their work is not yet comprehensive, at the start, these will be able to, among others, narrate tales online to their remote listeners.

The discourse on cloud schools comes at an interesting moment when two major cloud giants, Microsoft and Google are competing to win tutors’ and pupils’ hearts into their respective platforms. This comes from the understanding that many educators are at the crossroads of which applications between the two companies suit them best. This may be healthy for the future of cloud-based education in the future, considering that independent platforms like that of the professor are already making a mark in the sector.

By John Omwamba

It Is All New Ideas In Canada’s Cloud And Tech Meetings

It Is All New Ideas In Canada’s Cloud And Tech Meetings

On June 19 to 21, Canadians and other worldly geeks have a chance to attend a conference on ideas that goes under the theme Ideacity. There will be more than meets the eye in this conference, as it will attract a plethora of idea spinners, who dream big and bring the ideal to the table. One of these will be able to offer a sample of how cloud computing can make 3-dimension printing a reality to anyone who wishes to churn out as many copies with different sides as possible.

The essence of the meeting will be to have men, some of whom are rich over their shoulders, say something that passes as smart to their keen audience. It might or might not have a cloud tag to it, but still, it will amount into a tech’s ideal situation. For instance, the man who invented a bicycle made of cardboard will enunciate how it is dynamic in form, materially firm, and water resistant, besides why it has to cost nine dollars. On the sidelines will be the scientist who created the globe’s initial self-conscious robot, known as Nico.

New Horizons in Data

The connoisseurs who will attend the meeting will also have a chance to present their T/A with their effervescing ideas on cloud and data. One of these will be highlighting how to make much of analytics and glean more from a sample of data. Perhaps the expert will present a data analysis application, which is currently available on the web. This app helps webmasters, researchers and tech staff, among others, to use data correctly after analyzing it. Apparently, the same billionaire behind the above product is also a leader in pioneering information systems appropriate for the handheld device, including smartphones.

Big data, as it affects the industries at the heart of modern life, will also have a field day on the upcoming summit. One of the experts in this niche will be exploring how a novel mass transportation product will enable persons to propel via vacuum pipes at neck breaking velocity.

Other Meetings

This will not be the only cloud meeting that will be taking place in Canada. There will be plenty others, with key among them involving Chief Information Officers (CIOs), who will be discussing the question of the private cloud. On the sidelines, these experts will also tackle the query of the triple leading advantages of the cloud app transit or method of delivering stats to the user. This conference will take place in the city of Toronto, perhaps the city that is synonymous with the cloud scene in the country, alongside Ottawa and Winnipeg.

By John Omwamba

Report Traces Cloud Computing Security Errors To Errant Humans

Report Traces Cloud Computing Security Errors in India, other Countries to Errant Humans

While India has attracted a number of big giants in the Information Technology and cloud computing niches, it still ranks as one of the top guns that suffer security compromises. A report that came out early June, with a focus on the 2012 cloud environment around the globe, and particularly the subcontinent, showed a trend of rising cost-per-safety-compromise that is likely to hike where humans botch up their digital work. The report finds crossroads between the three-quarters of data the Indian subcontinent lost over the past year to human laxity, in organizational matters, and system hitches. At the same time, the global equivalent of these compromises that had similar causes to that of India, the human and the technical, were two-thirds.

The Expense

The approach of this report is that of costs that emanate from the act of security infiltration for each time it happens. The median for the planet’s compromises in 2012 was worth about 7360 Indian Rupees, which comes to mean a lot of data bucks going down the drain, and machines crashing. The Indian equivalent of this breach reaches to 2271 Rupees per hit, infection or data loss. If one were to multiply these instances, it would mean a whole industry collapsing from too much occurrences of an ugly character.

Not quite surprising, the industries that rely mostly on cloud computing are the major victims of this breach on their servers. These include companies in the pharmacy industry, one of the mainstays of the Indian merchant economy, medical sector and finance. Interestingly, the sectors, in spite of being the most close to call, for they enjoy close surveillance by the administration, underwent security barrages of above 70%, in cost, than the rest.

The Solution

Despite the proliferation of insecurity in the cloud computing dispensation in India, there is still a light at the end of the tunnel in the name of departmental approach. The report delineated contexts where companies with CISO or officials who look into the security wing of the compute, storage or software offering in a company, had less malfunctions than the rest. This is because the technical officers routed out the clout in the eye of companies from within: the employees. Indeed, firms in India, or elsewhere, who only approach security from an offshore server perspective, are increasingly suffering breaches than those that guide their staff to secure their in-house systems.

The other factor is to undertake extensive response projections, to ensure that any new security incident will be easy to counter. Training the staff on the same is part of the bargain, for an organization does not rely on a security officer alone. The head of a high-profile institute in India has revealed, on the peripheries of this latest report, that an eight-year reconnaissance on data safety has revealed to them that staff habit is one of the most important disadvantages. In fact, between the unveiling of the last and this report, the breaches that link directly to staff have upped by 22%, perhaps due to the consciousness of the social web that has caught up with people, everywhere.

The recommendation is to keep data in the cloud secure by adopting the departmental approaches, above. Companies that have evolved dynamic safety frameworks have shown staying power. They have kept their employees’ private data, that of the organization and that of consumers, secure, to degrees that are 20% on the lower side of the global mean. This is because they know that security is not all about the sites or servers, but the devices, which can include cell phones, computers or any other gadget.

The report reveals much about cloud computing security that is not just Indian but global. From small-scale theft of data though flash discs to high-profile cyber phishing, companies, on the modern platform, have to deal with complex safety issues. However, as the Indian case has revealed, the best way is to start from below, by dispelling the petty data theft issues, before inching up the staff ladder, appropriating response mechanisms, and finally, incorporating CISOs to oversee organizational cloud security framework.

By John Omwamba

Australia Follows US, UK Lead In Embracing The Cloud Nationally

Australia Follows US, UK Lead In Embracing The Cloud Nationally

Australia Follows US, UK Lead in Embracing the Cloud Nationally

The Land Down Under has finally prioritized the use of cloud computing for public bureaucracy, albeit a notch lower than the dedicated approach by two economic powers, on either side of the Atlantic. The Aussie approach of the cloud niche is one of gradual adoption, where necessary, whereas that of Britain and the United States is a ‘do or die’ unilateral approach. It was only last month that the United Kingdom conjoined all IT departments, in public offices, through a single, mandatory cloud infrastructure. Now, Australia has used its National Broadband Network (NBN) to reach out to public institutions, to maximize on the storage, efficiency and economical attributes of cloud computing.

Australia Desert

A Little Low key

Though the state has shown its willingness to achieve great heights by acknowledging the power of technology, nationally, it is, nevertheless, not an all-out run into the cloud. Rather, the government has specified that a huge chunk of the $5b that goes to the Information Technology budget, per year, will branch off to the cloud segment of the sector. Furthermore, the state advised that while it is not mandatory that all mass offices must adopt the technology, particular departments should upgrade to the cloud when it is virtually necessary.

Though jittery about the lack of holistic immersion by the government, analysts are lauding the move, calling it ‘smart,’ especially from an economical point of view. This is the initial step for an industry that will surely receive whole embracing by the country in coming years. Observers are also simmering down the hardcore stand by critics who advise of more government commitment in the sector, by saying that even when the state declines to follow the British lead, it will still reap rewards.

They also call this a prudent move because of the fact that the Land Down Under is not as under similar financial constrains as its more illustrious equivalents, the US and UK. This explains why the administration did not regard the migration to the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) niche, so critical. Indeed, most developing countries, by their very economical dilemmas, have no choice but use the cheap service of compute technology to save costs. Thus, it is not surprise that a well-off economy like that of Australia should stay behind times and wait until when its cloud industry has reached maturity and then act. Who knows but the economy will be better off, then, than it is now?

Skepticism

There are some in Australia, and abroad, who beg to differ on the issue of cloud computing playing second fiddle to IT, in general. They are cautioning that the sector is impossible to do without in the future and thus, the state should have brought about a strong blueprint and deadlines to make this a sector with staying power. As a first move, they are advising that there should have been a plan of gradual adoption of the technology, rather than the sketchy, financial tack that is the current approach.

Others are pointing out to the offshore cloud’s taking advantage of this mechanism in the dearth of a dynamic national program. They say that had the administration decided to strengthen its sector, it could have attracted open source app developers and cloud players from abroad that could have helped develop a unique framework within the country’s borders.

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, however, for Aussie companies. Firms are touting that this move tilted the dice table to their side in that they can wholly immerse themselves in the international market. They say that this is where the future of cloud computing lies. Furthermore, they feel like they can be more competent when they are tackling rivals all over the World Wide Web.

By John Omwamba

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Tech Experts Advise Canada To Stop Playing Second Fiddle To The Spying Issue On Its Cloud

Tech Experts Advise Canada to Stop Playing Second Fiddle to the Spying Issue on Its Cloud

Since early last decade, 2001 to be exact, following the terrorist attacks on US soil, the Canadian cloud scene has seen the laws that followed the disaster play out against it. According to a recent cloud conference in Ottawa that had in attendance among others the world’s leading search company, it has emerged that the North American country is playing second fiddle, too much, to the US data spy bill. This is because companies in Canada feel that, since they use most of their compute service from the superpower down south, they are under its very talons of privacy infiltration.

Forget the Laws and move on

The 2001 bill that extended the ability of the United States to monitor data by its citizens abroad and, later, to users of its tech companies’ services, has been the center of this issue. It is for this reason that a tech expert in a Canadian American Business Council’s meeting, advised local companies, especially in the private sector, to forget about the Bill, however illegitimate, and go ahead.

The expert touted that while the companies in this country lag behind chewing the bone of espionage concerns, the rest of the world is making headway. He also explained that change is indispensible at such a time that the world cannot do without the cost-efficient, pay-as-you-use, phenomenon. Indeed, the world’s major providers of cloud services charge very little per each utility of services, including storage and hosting, in comparison with a firm establishing its own data facility.

The Canadian scheme is especially inspiring because of its proximity to the globe’s tech epicenter, and for that matter, compute services, the US. Most of the web-based mail, storage, innovation, and app-developer companies are all down across the Great Lakes region. This is why analysts are saying that the faster the Canadians left the scourge of spying behind and prioritized on associations and development, the better it will become for them.

Cloud Proliferation Everywhere

From the banking sector to higher education, and from government to the private sector, cloud computing is in the midst of every business in Canada, if not the rest of the planet. The rising demand for cloud services has shot beyond earlier surmises, from the fact that states can reduce their running expenses and so do private companies that seek efficient delivery of their data output. To make the outreach between end-users and tech giants greater than it is now, it has emerged that the providers are carving out new niches in which to clinch deals before their rivals do so. This is why in, Australia, for example, tech multinationals are already advising the state to embrace a national cloud framework, so that they can step in and prioritize on delivering a unique cloud ecosystem. This follows the announcement by the country that it has inched a step closer to fully embracing the sector in its existing ICT framework.

The most recent occurrence that led to further spy complications, is when the United States, in February 2013, said that it could track down, legally, all data that is under storage by any of its home service providers, regionally and offshore. It is upon this issue and similar others, that experts counsel on forgetting and moving on, because the law is not easy to review. Meanwhile, the administration in Canada has its in-house compute services, though only to a certain limit, for its HR and economical data niches. This ensures that it does not have to bear espionage suspicions all the time.

By John Omwamba

Towards A Cloud Common Market: UK Administration Has G-Cloud In Tow

Towards a Cloud Common market: UK Administration has G-Cloud in Tow

While many states seek to establish a framework, guiding mechanisms, and caveats that should govern their Information Technology, if not cloud computing, markets, some countries go ahead to endorse the cloud as a market of choice. The United Kingdom has joined a select few countries of the globe that now take IT and server-based storage seriously. Next to the Aussie and American demonstration of the cloud as a national issue, via appropriating policies and security protocols, the British have gone a step further by instituting the sector. Through the G-Cloud, as they are calling this integration that cuts across a wide market spectrum, both governmental and independent, all companies are on board.

What is G-Cloud?

It is a structure that evolves polices for the British cloud and appends major entities to support with applications and data facilities. While admittedly selective in its kind of services, from certain major labels, the G-Cloud dispensation, nevertheless, enjoys a great vendor outreach. Current data of the final week of May reveals that within a click of a button, any department, public or private, in this cloud network, can acquire apps, or rather services, numbering up to 7000. Where do they emanate from? They are the applications, in an Infrastructure as a Service, Software as a Service, Platform as a Service and Security as a Service, connotations, from giants and newcomers in the cloud computing niche.

The upshot of this new institutional framework is that it is already getting in vogue with characteristic vibrancy. One of the latest appendages of progress is that there is a CloudStore from where all kinds of apps and services are accessible. The major players, currently, are already increasing the reach of the store, the latter being primarily for stocking SaaS products, by improving on the IaaS framework. This means that in a few months time, major IT companies will be operating gigantic data facilities, especially for administrative storage purposes.

Word is out in the street that, by monetary sense, the CloudStore is not doing badly either, even when still a greenhorn. 14 million Sterling Pounds had already changed hands, at the beginning of 2013, which only hints of the great extent that figure may have hiked to, by now. This is despite the fact that there are no boundaries of buying. A department need not buy from this store in order to stay afloat, cloud-wise. It can also transact directly with vendors, thus bringing a competitive edge, for the store in question, at improving its offerings from within.

Is it popular? G-Cloud has since become a label of some sort in public Information Technology departments. These are taking advantage of the very premise of the project, commodity-pooling. This is where the cloud amasses a number of products and services from diverse providers and developers in one pool. This means that the departments are thereby shopping in one centralized outlet that has the proud fact of having countenancing by the UK authorities.

How is it a Common Market?

The above dissection of how there is commoditization and mass exodus by IT departments of public institutions into the new provision, clearly indicates it is the new name of the game, in the cloud market. The term, common market, as it applies here, stems from the fact that Britain is seeking to harmonize the scalable potentialities of the cloud into its policy framework. This means that it will be formulating matters, concerning which, depending on the sector’s current stage of development. Furthermore, the UK government’s website clearly reveals the intention to scale public ‘economies of scale.’ In short, the entrepreneurial uptime that emanates from the cost-effective platform that is compute infrastructure and pay-as-you-use framework that is software as a service will yet become a public possession.

Ultimately, G-Cloud envisages the government’s intention to reduce the carbon footprint. Because data centers use sustainable energy and are in remote locales, the government and private sectors will, henceforth, do away with huge hardware networks and reduce the ecological disaster that stems from this electronic clutter. Finally, there will be a procurement advantage in the sense that the state will be studying the market changes and appropriating a buyer and vendor equilibrium where none fails the other. When the vendor is there, it is with the apps that the state wants and when the buyer is present, it is for the apps that the vendor has.

By John Omwamba

Startup Brings Wine To The Cloud Cellar

Startup Brings wine to the Cloud Cellar

They say that wine gets better with age. This is only true, however, when it is under slow fermentation in a cellar, and at that, a cloud-based dungeon, if the following news-making transition by a US company is anything to go by. The startup has already transferred all sales, marketing and distribution constituents of its brewery to the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) framework. One only has to make a request, and voila, the bottle is at the table, abroad.

There are some worthy additions, however, that make this more than mere email marketing or even traditional commodity shipping. The automated sales platform of the company is tracking down its growing list of prime tasters, now numbering 100, by suggesting improvements to their cellars. Market information shows that it can construe persuasive marketing to such personal quips as, one’s store is half full and it needs a refill, or one’s stock of the foregoing week remains untouched, despite having changed hands, and maybe the wine connoisseur needs a new brand from the same company.

The move to the cloud by this company by man and wife, who come from different fields, one in vintage wine and the other finance, has attracted rave press on the web. The primary point of lauding is the revolution they are making to customer relationship. It is now even possible to orientate the pricing to much cheaper value than that of a physical store. The upshot of this is that a bottle can go for as little as $130, a difference that halves the price of the same quantity, the previous year. The reason for this is simple: the cloud has a centralized and commodity-savvy system that reduces expenses of equipment. Storage is pay-as-you-use and the applications are at throw away prices, should one make the necessity of availing them.

There are already big names in the celebrity rooster that have joined the century-odd prime wine tasters, for the US startup. These include the cinema star, Harrison Ford, who is apparently enjoying the break from the conventional location-based wine shop.

The startup also vaunts a consortium of bright lights in their fields that are helping the husband-and-wife team to run the company on the public cloud. One of these is a partner with a tech establishment, while the other works with the World Economic Forum. This gives but a hint of how business and finance go hand-in-hand with technology.

Apparently, the company whose physical offices are in St. Helena says that its appellation, Soutirage, derives from a French word that means culling of lees at the bottom of the drink, from pure wine. Thus, it may look, from the outset, like a pure offering for the elite through the cloud computing conduit.

In denouement, it suffices to say that these wine revolutionists are not using cloud computing in the traditional way to reach consumers. Albeit, they approach digital marketing as gentlemen who do not lure their clients by a fusillade of email lists. There are no Press Releases, either. Rather, they use individual quips to poke the ribs of each of the prime clients and thus have them take another bottle off the soft rack. There is also the appendage of advisory communiqués on what wine in the market, currently lifts one’s spirit best. To do this work, the team passes the information to the select customers on a regular basis, via, as one may have guessed, technological outlets. To this end, the consumers have the luck of getting microscopic updates about their latest wine bottles, in their cloud ‘cellars.’

By John Omwamba

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Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Security In The IoT The network security market is experiencing a pressing and transformative change, especially around access control and orchestration. Although it has been mature for decades, the network security market had to transform rapidly with the advent of the BYOD trend and emergence of the cloud, which swept enterprises a few years ago.…