Author Archives: John

IT as a Service Emerges As The Most Tangible Trend In Cloud Computing

IT as a Service Emerges As The Most Tangible Trend In Cloud Computing

The face of the way people always approached their technical computer hitches might change if this has not occurred already. The latest trends showcase changes sweeping across the sector that are overthrowing IT staff in favor of data centers and end-users. This is largely motivated by the fact that IT as a Service has gained a foothold in most hosting platforms. This is a shortcut that gives the consumers the ability to supervise and even determine the price they remit for receiving Information Systems updates. Unlike other services before, here is, for once, tangible facilitation with measurable qualities.

One of the fears of the quintessential IT professionals is that ITaaS has double-crossed them. Customers are no longer calling the nearest technician to set up a program. Why, that program is readily available at a remote host somewhere, and at a quantifiable cost at that.

Secondly, the switch of the private cloud to the consumer world has benefited the latter to the extent that they can use apps they have created through established platforms as their own. This means they can expand a Smartphone stat and make use of it in their intranets. The self-determination eliminates the need for an Information Systems’ overseer.

The less endowed users will have much to thank remote providers of the service for accessing everything without the need for physical presence. There are even servers that come with a provision for fixing hitches in personal computers, so that they can be compatible with the scope of data coming from the host.  This is the miracle of virtualization, at its best, where one can run a fully-fledged business with neither hands-on skills in IT nor a network department to deal with network issues. This is because all these matters are in the hands of the operators within the remote hosting setting.

Some players are arguing that this model is just for consumer relationship management, but it will do more than that. It is revolutionizing the way people always approached the costs of intangible services. If, for example, one took a computer for repair in a hardware shop, chances are that there would be no standard payment. The technician would assign the repair cost based on merit. The same case applies to the installation of programs. However IT comes with as near tangible a payment model as people will ever see, when entrenched within the cloud. There will be no more need to negotiate when exact costs of use will be apparent, in a jiffy, after every session.

All indications are clear that indeed cloud computing and IT as a Service are now in one league. There are bound to be drastic changes here and there though. One of these is the threat to the IT experts who thrive on troubleshooting and have not yet joined the cloud. There will also be more transparency in the way costs have always been calculated. The platform is tangible beyond argument.

By John Omwamba

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: YobiDrive

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: YobiDrive

Top 25 European Risng Stars: YobiDrive

….YobiDrive: A Smart Choice for Cryptographic File Sharing on The Cloud

The Top 25 European Rising Stars is a special annual series by CloudTweaks, where we seek to celebrate new cloud startups that have demonstrated the strongest impact across the year. These have earned little or no press coverage nor loquacious claims but they are indeed rising. To authoritatively arrive at the top 25, we have applied a criteria pegged on critical parameters like the quality of management, current funding, valuable service provision, European based and professionalism in all respects.

In the face of the rise of the Smartphone as the major tool of communication and even for remote business interaction today, it was high time encryption technologies improved. There are upcoming cloud providers ready to meet this deficit. One such provider is YobiDrive, a Luxembourg startup that is leveraging on the way individuals and corporate entities exchange files cryptically. They can even choose on how they want to disburse the files, who can gain a key into the documentation stage, and who has the viability to access the finished product.

There are three approaches to YobiDrive in terms of:

1. Device-to-device harmonization
2. Cryptographic cloud storage
3. Core Services: File Sharing

Device-to-device Harmonization:  From the homepage of YobiDrive, one gets to visualize how diverse gadgets, ranging from tablets to smart cellular devices, can interact privately. If the user is away from office, he or she only needs to unlock the company’s or private cloud to either view or work on a document. There is a similar model, albeit concentrating more on cryptography in Microsoft’s workspace, which envisions a way of letting people view content in its read-only format, but they cannot go into altering it if they have no authority. YobiDrive, does not concentrate as much on the above score as it does in ensuring that only an authorized ID unlocks private information using a different device. This is why the startup uses API technology to ensure that no matter how different a mobile gadget’s operational framework is from that of a computer, the latter being the source of the private data, the data remains foolproof against illegal tapping.

Cryptographic Cloud Storage: Going by the multi-tenancy option of the cloud, YobiDrive expands its file sharing drive into a fully-fledged cryptographic sending-and-receiving storage conduit. This deters other networks within a multiple-tenant cloud infrastructure from reading each other’s data that is always in perpetual motion. In the face of it, the startup has recognized the need for double-encrypting documents, in their finished file stage, so that when they are in transit, they do not spill some of their contents to hackers. This is courtesy of its key technology, alongside its drive-style remote storage. Of course even the drive is not averse to viral attacks, which makes the encryption precaution a little off the mark, for as Microsoft’s  research team says, it is more about searching for “homomorphic encryption” and similar trials that the consolidation of existing crypto technology will finally succeed.

Core Services: File Sharing: The YobiDrive’s agility at file sharing is discernable in the ability to improve uptime and reduce the time a file spends on the network during the remission process. The software edifies a single click impetus, even when a file is in the documentation stage, right into a published format. Say, if one is working on a blog post on the current  offers that his/ her company has in store, they can keep hitting the button, stage by stage, to save the publication instead of undergoing many stages before publishing. There is also an organizing icon from this provider that helps to profile the valid partners in an ongoing file exchange project. Each receives a key to the repository, so that the files can stay in an anonymous format that only the partners can unlock when need be. The accessibility limitation even moves into the world of equal partners: users can curtail the seeing of the work in progress until a certain time comes. Microsoft’s research lab, however, sees certain obstacles in that format meaning that the Internet as a browsing field, will initiate search with certain keywords that will allow the work to be available even in its encrypted form. Thus, in spite of trying the best to make file sharing a secure process by cloud security standards, YobiDrive can do more to boost this overlook.
Users on Google webmaster pages are already recommending the technology with some commenting on the software as being “fully elastic.” There are also overtones of how the storage solution adheres to S3 implementation guidelines, thus making its cloud suitability even greater.

Thus, YobiDrive qualifies into the Top 25 European Rising Stars because of the fact that it is fully-fledged in storage, cryptography and file sharing. There might be loopholes, here and there, but any way, encryption has always attracted diverse views. The Luxembourg startup is an offering of the EZC Group.

By John Omwamba

Lessons From The Hobbit: Cloud Computing Education

Lessons from the Hobbit for Cloud Computing Education

Though he penned it in 1937, J.R.R. Tolkien had much coming for the writer on cloud computing topics of this time and age, in the twenty first century. The Hobbit movie, a Middle earth tale of the coming-out-of-the-hole, fear and snugness of a hobbit which leads to far-reaching exploits that cut across dangerous and fantastic lands, has come out. One can trace parallels between the production and cloud computing, key among these including the following, according to a Windows IT Pro article.

Okay, in the beginning “there lived a hobbit in a hole.” This is the opening line of the tale, but to some, it might mean the closed-in world of Information Technology where company executives are satisfied with their computer technicians. However, Bilbo soon leaves the hole, hankering after treasure after persuasion by a horde of thirteen dwarves plus a wizard. On the way to the Desolation of Smaug, they have to improvise answers far away from any brick-and-mortar computer shop. This is where cloud computing education comes in.

After desertion by Gandalf, the Wizard, who is after his own grand plans of overcoming the force in the universe called the Necromancer, Bilbo and company, is left to improvise roles. He saves the skin of all his companions, who are frequently at a fix in the hands of goblins, spiders, and finally Gollum. Indeed, the ring he gets from Gollum forms the infrastructure of the cloud education in the story because without it, he would not be ubiquitous and invisible to foes. Thus, in a situation where the wizard who has disappeared has been the Chief Information Officer, then Bilbo settles down into becoming a guide who does not have any especial knowledge about IT, per se, but uses the cloud (the ring) to learn more about how to overcome hurdles.

Sometimes he has to troubleshoot in the following symbolic encounters:

The walk in Spider land: If Chief Information Officers want to bring their staff to understand the cloud better, they need to help them seek solutions rather than be baby fed. Though it is mandatory for a firm to join the pay-as-you-earn infrastructure these days if it wants to survive, it can, however, only select apps that suit it through the collective IT team and staff. This is why Biblo’s invisibility helps him to use special weapons, including stones (apps) that he has chosen, to troubleshoot the spiders’ cobwebs and thus rescue his entrapped team.

The Barrel Ride: Another important lesson for company executives who want to educate staff about the cloud is that of using in-house cloud understanding before imposing cloud jargon on them. The end-user cannot fully appreciate terms like sharing resources, if he or she does not benefit from it. By taking his prying powers in a cave where they were held hostage, Bilbo used his understanding of the use of barrels that promoted barter trade between Middle- earth communities, down the river, to rescue his compatriots by this means. Indeed, sharing of resources could not be clearer to him than using barrels and hiding each of the dwarves in each to reach the other end, unharmed, as was customary of river trading in the Hobbit.

The Long road to Dragon Encounter: It took years of toil to make it to the dragon’s lair for the Hobbit team. Similarly, CIOs should look ahead, like the crew in the book and movie did, to reach their destination and back without hurt. In the present context of many applications and infrastructures, like EC2, Windows 8 and others, it is impossible to know which to incorporate as a cloud education program with success.

This is why one can contextualize all the many challenges in a fantasy novel, review the unknown challenges one has to face, but in the end, use the One Ring as one’s cloud infrastructure to the Promised Land or corporate success. At the end, the hobbit team avails what every enterprise needs, with as few bucks spent as possible, on the way: treasure.

By John Omwamba

What Happens When Cloud Computing Embraces Evolving Antivirus Brands As Security Models?

What Happens When Cloud Computing Embraces Evolving Antivirus Brands As Security Models?

Three areas of cloud computing are the crisis points of security breaches. Were it not for Software as a Service (SaaS) programs, there would be no malware. Similarly, but for the openings in the server connections in a network or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), cases of mistrust between proxies would never be an issue. Lastly, were it not for the break in the wall of Platform as a Service (PaaS) as the development platform where hackers can find a field day, there wouldn’t be any security concerns for the cloud community.

Still, the evolving nature of traditional antivirus giants may one day become the saving grace against hardware and cyber crimes that center on mistrust. Though antivirus is like a physical injection, it still qualifies as an all-embracing technology that has legal implications. For example, McAfee, one of the biggest antivirus providers has migrated into the cloud with the aim to certify server networks and a collection of IP sites in a certain domain with particular security details. If the cloud computing providers breach these enforcements, they stand to lose their support by the antivirus companies while their clients may learn that their data stays unguarded.

There are many things that can happen when companies that were purely anti-malware evangelists a few years ago join in the frontline of cloud security. The advent of external monitoring, where the antivirus tool has mandate not on a single PC, but thousands, will keep the security certificates in par with a certain standard. Indeed, it is like bringing the IT department into the cloud—here, any breach will not find a ready culprit in the person of a technician, but in a remote tool that has failed to diagnose a security issue. Perhaps a possible oversight is what has prompted antivirus giants to request network kingpins and server hosts to divulge on ISP certificates and other details of safety installations to help perpetuate collective intelligence.

Talking about intelligence related to the rest of the networks in the cloud, the future technology against malware will be minimalist. It will not occupy intimidating space on the CPU like it does now. In fact, issues of setting up a program will no longer be attended by third-party assertions that the installation can only happen when an accessory virus technology is also a part of the download. In other words, the good side of this evolving technology is that it will lighten up hard disk space when working on the desktop, surfing the Internet, or tapping SaaS data because the facilitation will be ingrained in the cloud.

Finally, network intelligence will also help alleviate cloud security emergencies because the antivirus tools will be able to detect instantly the presence of a bug through analytical and networking means. It will quickly use existing resources to trace the source. Who knows, it might even penalize the infrastructure service from which the malware emerges. Right now, it is difficult to trace the path of a bug along the access-intermediary-core layers other than knowing that it comes from a certain link to a customer’s PC. Collective intelligence will help open up new horizons in the cloud that can map the career of a virus.

In short, debugging in the cloud may not be just that of customers relying on the service providers to safeguard their data. Rather, an evolving antivirus might help shield end users from frequent hardware attacks from unknown sources. It will use remote monitoring and will certify major networks that serve data users in their security mandates.

By John Omwamba

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: Cluttr

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: Cluttr

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: Cluttr

…….The Latest Wave in Third-party Data Infrastructure Auditing for Cloud Efficiency

With one year to its name counting, Cluttr is the brainchild of two campus graduates from Ghent, Belgium. The firm focuses its energies on the data providers and the companies that seek to leverage on their data networks and equipment to make them eco-friendly. In short, this startup uses third-party software and technology to improve “energy, operational and infrastructure efficiency.” While auditing the optimal capacity of a data establishment, it helps remove extra backlogs while aiding Information Technology departments to operate seamlessly outside their hitherto retrogressive hardware-only cocoons.

Data center efficiency, for Cluttr, is two-paced. Firstly there are the little clouds by corporations and then there is the web-based one for fully-fledged data facility operators. Both concentrate on equipment. Cluttr investigates and tables results of how this equipment can stem ventilation and power consumption costs.

The company undertakes a three-tier procedure once an invitation comes in from a data provider. Firstly, it inspects the equipment to note their age, models and other statistics that might help provide a clue on consumption rate. The professionals then set up tools in place to monitor backlogs, test the efficiency levels of the technology in use, and document the energy input levels throughout a given timeline. The third step is to decode the results that their tools have obtained before going to the iterating stage: this is where an exhaustive and full audit of the results helps to expose all weaknesses and suggest feasible fixtures. It is after this that Cluttr presents its auditing suggestions to the datacenter replete with the equipment to obtain technology to use, HVAC devices, if any, to employ, and cloud systems to deploy. While that is a step-by step process, Cluttr also offers third-party solutions for managed cloud systems for corporations and professional datacenter operators. In the managed system, it closes the gap between the server owners and the software companies that rely on them in the cloud. It acts as the bridging gap too, on any research and auditing that needs to occur to know which deployment infrastructure model would suit a given company model. Does it need to deploy in the private or public clouds? It can do the necessary research for the clients eager to transform their businesses’ data infrastructure.

OpenStack is one of the major software offerings for provisioning datacenters on the cloud while offsetting the operational cost. Cluttr recommends two approaches to this cloud platform, including the Nova, as well as, Swift options. The former allows one to deploy to the cloud, in-house, using CPUs and other IT department’s basic equipment. The latter, on the other hand, helps to create efficiency on low-level servers in a way that they can be able to increase their storage scope, without passing the buck to the user.

Looking at the OpenStack system, it is easy to tell why Cluttr edifies it. The cloud platform has open source merits that can penetrate closed-in hardware elements so that the machines can be compatible with new cloud applications. Secondly, it helps to minimize the costs of operating huge data facilities, using open source stats, while still seeking to gain the same hosting capabilities as, say, Amazon S3. To be sure, this might be one of the reasons why the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration used the platform, two years ago, to implement some of its big data projects. Otherwise, the implementation could have eaten up large sums in traditional hosting environments.

On the flip side, Cluttr as a name is contradictory. It seeks to de-clutter the datacenter off backlogs that create power inefficiencies, through auditing and third-party equipment provisions, yet it carries the semantic overtone of ‘clutter.’ Still, as its partners Fredrik Van Hecke and Launrent Mainil say on the ‘About Page’ it is not about what their firm’s appellation suggests but their working goals: “simplicity and efficiency.”As a go-between between data centers and users of the web-based cloud, Cluttr deserves some accolades. The company has some connections with some machine companies including Dell and HP, which relationship, according to these professionals, helps datacenters to find the best compute equipment to suit their clients’ storage needs. When it comes to provisioning, the corporate companies may rely on companies like Cluttr to obtain managed hosting resources, in private intranets. In this regard, they work with quintessential provisioning providers like Rackspace for tech help throughout the year. The problem with this kind of arrangement is that it is subjective in nature. It might happen that one customer does not use HP products or another is not pro-Rackspace, which might cut professional ties with Cluttr.

In conclusion,

Cluttr makes it to the next wave of Top 25 Rising Stars in Europe because it has an original niche: that of third-party provisioning and direct auditing of system efficiency. It helps leverage energy consumption, eco-friendly at that, in web-based datacenters and cuts staff spending on hardware repairs in a typical company using the private cloud. It is also professionally run, going by the fact that it has co-founders with different managerial roles. It also features a professional advisor and an investor.

Previous Mention: Audriga

By John Omwamba

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: Audriga

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: Audriga

Top 25 European Rising Stars: Audriga

……..Audriga says It’s Time to Stop an Email Clog via Its Migration SaaS

The German startup, Audriga has not many peers in a business that many have thought does not exist. According to Gartner, transferring an email with all its contents requires $18. Now one considers what it amounts to when an entity not only transfers its staff’s, personal and corporate emails, but does away with one host for another domain provider without losing its data stream. Mind-boggling sums are already forming in the head.  Audriga says that it stems the billowing tide of expense by using its Software as a Service (SaaS) migration cloud to reduce costs in about three spheres:

  • Software
  • Infrastructure
  • Security

For software solutions, the typical cloud can readily supply an answer with its pay-as-you-go formula. However, Audriga has a browsing tool that helps to configure the migration process, online, without any need to install or pay for software. This is while not forgetting the ease, uptime and fastness of the transfer. As all open source technologies are, there are no barriers between one diverse format and another for they all melt into one compatible application. This is the same situation with this particular offering.

In infrastructure, the word is uptime. Audriga does not send one webmail account to a remote data center, at a time, but uses the wide network broadband of the cloud to migrate simultaneously. It can send an entire blog to another host or pile up documents from a webmail that is full in the company’s private data base. All this happens in one fell swoop. Julius Parisius of Karlsruhe says of the product:
The service was easy to use and the migration succeeded flawlessly.

Security for contacts and personal data migration is possible by Audriga’s assertion of sticking to European Union regulations about information safety. The startup does this by ensuring that it follows all privacy and Information Technology policies that are on the ground.

Audriga uses its Migrate-mail.com domain to initiate the process of sending finance, market and product emails into the desired end point. The latter can be a new domain, online mail portal or in-house database. In market terms, one can see how the email lists of two hundred consumers, for example, on the site, underwent over three thousand migrations to a new hosting platform. In finance matters, one espies the removal of account details from a provider to another while in the product sphere, one sees the development phase (with all the research and troubleshooting data collected within the phase) migrate to a better web storage base.

Audriga is pretty audacious for a recent site because it not only targets consumers but Information Technology experts and hosting firms. When it is not dealing with consumers, like companies directly, it offers what it calls “migration as a service” to hosts and IT personnel. The site remarks that hosts can increase their domain sales when they provide space from which users can migrate their contacts easily if need be. The allowance to move to a new webmail or hosting environment gives users confidence in that their data, under the current provider, is safe, besides the assurance that they can transfer it without complications. Information Technology teams benefit from the fact that they get to fast-track the migration procedure without any hitches. Whether it is an IT department outsourcing for a company or for the host, either way it benefits by increasing customer confidence when the transition is hitch-free.

When it comes to cross-platform migration, Audriga works with several desktop and online systems. One of these is the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software. This happens through integration of Interface Programming (API), where various apps work together in a design that requires no further software installation. Workspace management programs also sync with the Audriga’s applications. The startup does not mention whether it works with specific Operating System’s products, search engine systems or software of similar nature from private vendors. MigrationWiz, another established cloud migrating company, specifically mentions its industry systems like Gmail and Windows mailing products.

Audriga, one of the three best startups in Europe, according to a EuroCloud rewarding platform, is based in the biggest economy in Europe, Germany. Its founders include Frank Dengler, Hans-Jorg Happel and Dr. Thomas King. All of them contribute in different managerial and operational roles, which have perhaps made their startup worthy of being one of the European Rising Stars.

Previous Mention: Filespirit

By John Omwamba

2012: A Look Back Into Parallels Between Cloud And Education

2012: A Look Back into Parallels Between Cloud and Education

2012 has so far seemed like the proverbial year where there is always some gigantic technological breakthrough simmering in the underground. It also appears to be a year where most teaching staff will be telling their pupils to put their cell phones on the desk and get ready for a lesson. This is because high-end handheld devices and laptops are becoming part of classroom learning. The following breakthroughs have particularly come out strong through 2012.

The thirty-dollar data machine

One of the most innovative products to come off the pipeline this year is a server that costs just thirty dollars. It is unbelievably efficient, helping students and their tutors to interact in class productively. It can support a self-hosted community of five dozen computers per session. This means that the learners themselves can become app developers who use the dynamic software that the hosting device comes with, as a platform for improving their program-making skills. This can even auger well with those who are studying to become experts in IT systems. Another advantage of this integrated system is that it has a mode for viewing podcasts and lecture material while offline. Thus, the necessity to have a web connection may become a thing of the past with such an invention.

Laptops everywhere

Another welcome move in the 2012 cloud and education niche is the appearance of NGO-and government-led initiatives in third-world countries to offer laptops at throw-away prices. Most of these initiatives are making it possible for every learner to access a single device of their own. The hundred-dollar electronics are now changing the way remote communities always approached education and are also reducing the energy consumption needs. These laptops come with less energy input demands than their commercial counterparts.

The advent of digital texts

It only requires a tour online, right now, to view a number of texts like essays that are available on the public domain. This is just an instance of the increase in accessibility of various documents of educational importance that have hitherto been limited to physical libraries. If it’s a text book that a student finds hard to access, he or she just needs to click on a reading website to view it or even download. The year thus qualifies as a time when entire manuscripts, not just for referencing, have become available, especially for university researchers.

Conferences

Though conferences have primarily focused on security issues within the cloud, the education sector has also benefited from the same conventions. Their main aim has been to improve the technological stakes in the sector. This is why one gets tablets for reading books that ease learning and increase accessibility of texts from various databases.  They also focus on expanding the outlook of learning opportunities through micro-learning schemes that emphasize on minimalist but high-end installations. The conferences have also tackled the way to make data available to learners as cheaply as possible.

The rest of 2012 has continued to narrow down the divide between education and cloud computing. There is much promise in 2013 as more companies demand academic qualifications from their staff, in the line of cloud learning environment. This might shape the future of education as a whole.

By John Omwamba

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: FileSpirit

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: FileSpirit

Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012: FileSpirit

…….Toast to Business on the Go with FileSpirit Mobile Browsing

The cloud sometimes appears cryptic, almost a necessary burden. At least this is so with reference to FileSpirit, a German tech startup from the town of Erlangen. The new file sharing company says that it rarely relies on the cloud other than as a network. This is a right swing against heavyweights like Dropbox whose large online databases require rummaging through searching for files in sub-folders  With FileSpirit, convenience, fast accessibility and no downloads are the highlights.

Remarkably, security is one of the major concerns about working with online sharing software. While YouSendIt and other big fish pass the buck to the security of the infrastructure, and the strength of the firewall, FileSpirit spirits the file away from not only themselves but the external world. The startup says that it has no ability to “decode” or ‘see’ data that passes through its software. This is rather inspiring for those who are averse about their documents going anywhere unencrypted. However, it leaves some technical questions in the air. For example, Google is able to decode objects out of pictures and even words out of passages that go through its cloud facilities.

Still, the startup is a force to reckon with when it comes to business-oriented software. Though Dropbox and the rest are huge and versatile, their sphere is the public, whereas FileSpirit is an app for entrepreneurs. It syncs with Customer Relationship Management (CRM) technology, among a host more applications. This means that creating customer lists, staging marketing campaigns and analyzing feedback can all occur on the go. ‘On the go’ because the app uses handsets as its main hardware platform for editing, sharing, collaborating, presenting minutes and transferring documents. There is even an offline option that allows entrepreneurs to handle business matters en-route to an airborne destination without the Internet. In terms of presentation, FileSpirit supports classic advancements like PowerPoint for quick note taking and presentation agility using charts in a business hall.

The offspring of FileSpirit is FileSpirit Connector. It is the app that one needs to install into a Windows PC or iOS data machine to initiate the file-sharing momentum between portable Apple devices and computers.
A winner in Mobile browsing?

The fact that FileSpirit does not condone keeping data in the cloud begs the question of how else the software handles huge files. The fact is that this is not a tool for the outsider: it targets the correct people who have an affinity with the entity that is disbursing its data to them. Most likely one is talking of remote company staff. FileSpirit uses private clouds by entities, or simple databases, to let target audiences access this data on their cellular devices, without having to search for them manually like in the cloud.

The startup has a mobile searching engine that lifts accessibility to terabytes of files in a jiffy. If one is operating away from office, he/she just needs to pop up the screen of the iPhone or iPad and do transactions online or offline.  Apart from the gains like search uptime, ending of backlog in downloading, and the updating character of the browser, FileSpirit is considerably narrow in clientele economics. One has to be in the cloud to enjoy cheap services but when files are inside a company’s database, like it is the case here, only those with the necessary technology, perhaps the staff can get it. Still, there is a counterargument to the effect that FileSpirit is in the right, for after all, its concern is that data gets to the most concerned person. On the flip side of the coin, the tool is almost like the cloud because it eliminates the need to employ Information Technology technicians or even bring down firewall in order to tap into a private database. The tool does all this without eclipsing the security role of the firewall.

Companies …are skittish about storing files in the cloud,” said Dominik Wever, who co-founded FileSpirit.

Perhaps the above emphasizes why they developed a tool that can circumvent companies’ fears by using it to decrypt documents to only people who matter to the organization like workers and clients. Testimonials come from Twitter handles like that of Jeffrey Blake that broadcasts the role of the tool to interconnect workers in out-of-office situations via mobile devices.

The startup deserves the motif of  Top 25 European Rising Stars 2012 for its image-oriented cellular browsing and file search. Indeed, end-users monitor the entire process of clicking into a file and seeing it in the form of an image, while it is processing, in the same manner as iTunes’ CoverFlow technology. With FileSpirit, digging out a file from a dungeon of corporate information is as easy as entering a cipher and (voila!) the file materializes into thin air. It is not as symbolic as it sounds, for the tool literary configures, rather than downloads a business file for viewing, editing and what not.

FileSpirit is located in Erlangen, Germany. Its two founders are Johannes Geyer and Dominik Wever.

Previous Mention: Zyncro

By John Omwamba

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The Internet of Things Lifts Off To The Cloud

The Internet of Things Lifts Off To The Cloud

The Staggering Size And Potential Of The Internet of Things Here’s a quick statistic that will blow your mind and give you a glimpse into the future. When you break that down, it translates to 127 new devices online every second. In only a decade from now, every single vehicle on earth will be connected…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Evolving Internet of Things  The Internet of Things, or IoT, a term devised in 1999 by British entrepreneur Kevin Ashton, represents the connection of physical devices, systems and services via the internet, and Gartner and Lucas Blake’s new infographic (below) explores the evolution of the IoT industry, investigating its potential impact across just about every…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud Cloud computing is more than just another storage tier. Imagine if you’re able to scale up 10x just to handle seasonal volumes or rely on a true disaster-recovery solution without upfront capital. Although the pay-as-you-go pricing model of cloud computing makes it a noticeable expense, it’s the only solution for many…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

Box.net, Amazon Cloud Drive The online (or cloud) storage business has always been a really interesting industry. When we started Box in 2005, it was a somewhat untouchable category of technology, perceived to be a commodity service with low margins and little consumer willingness to pay. All three of these factors remain today, but with…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Technology Influencer in Chief: 5 Steps to Success for Today’s CMOs

Technology Influencer in Chief: 5 Steps to Success for Today’s CMOs

Success for Today’s CMOs Being a CMO is an exhilarating experience – it’s a lot like running a triathlon and then following it with a base jump. Not only do you play an active role in building a company and brand, but the decisions you make have direct impact on the company’s business outcomes for…