Author Archives: kiril

Cisco Survey: The Mobile Cloud Office Generation

The Internet Is Fundamental Resource for the Humankind, Cisco Survey

Future leaders, workers, and customers will rely increasingly on cloud resources

More than half of all students and young professionals consider Internet as an “integral part of their lives,” according to Cisco’s Connected World Technology Report 2011. In fact, the report’s findings are comparable and somewhat similar to the results published in 2010, when the first such report was conducted. The next generation of leaders and workers is so accustomed to a Internet-rich life that the years to come would witness growing number of connected devices and gadgets, more mobile lifestyle and booming cloud market to meet the fast growing expectations of young people not to rely on fixed storage devices for their data and software applications they use.

The Internet is now a fundamental resource for the humankind with 33 percent of those polled considering it is of equal importance to their daily life as air, water, food, and shelter, according to the survey. Almost half of the respondents, or 49 percent of college students and 47 percent of employees, younger than 30, believe the World Wide Web and the Internet are “pretty close” to the level of importance water, food and shelter have for the human race. Overall, four of every five college students and young professionals is of opinion the Internet is vital part of their daily life although it would be interesting to see a study, asking questions why and how the Internet is vital for young peoples’ lives.

The majority of young employees, 62 percent, and 55 percent of college students polled believe their life’s daily sustenance is in jeopardy if they are denied access to the Internet, while 64 percent of students would select an Internet connection instead of a car. A very interesting choice indeed, especially in the light of global environmental issues and air pollution that cars produce globally.

Online interaction is becoming integral part of the lifestyle of the next generation with 27 percent of college students preferring to update their social network profiles, while social networks are more important to them than partying, dating, listening to music, or hanging out with friends. On paper, it should be good news for online social networks that compete fiercely in the cloud but it is an alarming trend too for contacts in person cannot be substituted by online chats, psychologists agree.

The coming customers are going to be increasingly mobile after the study found that 66 percent of college students and 58 percent of young professionals consider their mobile devices like laptops, tablets, or smarthphones “the most important technology in their lives”. Therefore, we are to witness an unprecedented growth of mobile devices and applications market with cloud services destined to play an important role in this mobile revolution due to the overwhelming volume of data people are going to store, share, and use online.

Moreover, smartphones and desktops are now equally important to the next generation: 19 percent of students believe their smartphone is their “most important device” they use daily while 20 percent consider their desktop as their ultimate device. Thus, hardware and software vendors will be forced to switch to a new type of highly mobile customers that will ask for more power, applications, functionality, and productivity offered by their smartphones. Part of the solution is shift to cloud-based services but telephone makers will be forced to seek new hardware solutions as well.

In fact, corporations would be forced to change their business and Internet strategies, including cloud adoption and cloud services, much faster than expected, according to Marie Hattar, vice president, Enterprise Marketing, Cisco. “The results of the Cisco Connected World Technology Report should make businesses re-examine how they need to evolve in order to attract talent and shape their business models. Without a doubt, our world is changing to be much more Internet-focused, and becomes even more so with each new generation,” she said in a statement.

If you believe that the Internet with its interconnected devices, cloud services, and vast amounts of data stored and shared in the cloud is as important as food and water, then you probably belong to a future generation. A generation whose idea what in the life on Earth is important and vital for the survival of the human race is very dissimilar to the mindset of many generations that inhabited this planet for centuries.

Anyway, IT companies and cloud service providers should be encouraged by the findings in the 2011 Connected World Technology Report 2011, while employers should look for new methods to attract their future employees with more than 60 percent of students polled last year not believing that work in a “classic” office adds to their productivity. Instead, they prefer to work from home or public places, connecting online to virtual offices while storing and accessing their data in the cloud. Thus, the next generation will rely on cloud services to an alarming degree, testing the abilities of both hardware and software vendors to provide, maintain, and develop a global network featuring unparalleled capabilities.

By Kiril Kirilov

Windows 8: Microsoft Finally Unveils OS Designed With Cloud in Mind

Windows 8: Microsoft Finally Unveils OS Designed With Cloud in Mind

“Metro-style” user interface aside, upcoming Windows 8 operating system is set to feature some useful cloud capabilities while developers and top executives at Microsoft still decline to unveil its full cloud capacity. Most analysts focus on Windows 8´s ability to run all applications in full screen mode, just like all tablets do now, so the new operating system is developed with multiple devices in mind; it would run across desktops, laptops, tablets, phones, and even ultrabooks, a product that is still to hit the market and prove its worthiness. Nevertheless, Microsoft have added interesting cloud abilities to their yet to be officially released OS, realizing that interconnectivity and interoperability of applications and services, namely cloud-based services and apps, are already reshaping the very structure of computing services and computing itself.

In Windows 8 applications will be allowed to collaborate and communicate with each other, enabling users to take advantage of several cloud services at once; using their social networking accounts to send messages or documents from multiple services like Facebook, Flickr, or whatever social network a customer is using.

Microsoft is to offer built-in cloud services (if we can speak of built-in cloud services at all) that are developed to communicate and work in real time with cloud-based solutions like SkyDrive. Thus, Windows 8 users will have access to online backup tools and storage space that can be accessed by various devices. In addition, Windows 8 enables such devices to easily communicate with each other, which is a step further in making a next generation OS distinct from older Windows versions that still rely on concept from the past, Windows 7 including.

On the other hand, it is unclear whether Windows 8, in its official release version, will be designed to support applications developed to run on cloud platforms other than Windows Azure and Microsoft Office 365. Apple iOS provides support for iPads and iPhones while a great number of smartphones run Google´s Android OS, and Microsoft should clearly state whether its cloud services will feature native applications that can run smoothly on such devices.

 

 

It looks like Microsoft is trying to open a new chapter in OS development with Windows 8, aiming to make an operating systems that would run everywhere on all devices connected to all available online and cloud services. Is it possible is an open-ended question, for we have not seen such an operating system before but Microsoft´s efforts should be encouraged. The software behemoth has been criticized for continuous attempts to monopolize the operating systems market but the time has come when even Microsoft realized that growing interconnectivity of computing devices no longer allows them to retain leading market positions without going to the cloud and sacrificing a fraction of its corporate and brand “sovereignty”.

Windows Live is not a new product, being introduced by Microsoft a few years ago, but in Windows 8 its cloud capabilities are significantly extended to allow users to keep their personalized desktop layout on any device they log in. Contacts from multiple cloud-based email services can be extracted by a People application that is embed in Windows 8, while SkyDrive connection is pre-installed on every Windows 8. The software supporting SkyDrive even enables access to remote devices that have been added to one´s SkyDrive account even across firewalls. How secure is this question is yet to be seen after Windows 8 hits the market on unspecified date next year.

On the downside, core Windows Explorer application is not permitted to have direct access and manage files stored on SkyDrive, forcing user to transfer and manage documents via web browser interface. It is an outdated concept, really, unless Microsoft developers have had particular security concerns in mind, designing the OS not be allowed to connect directly to the cloud storage.

Furthermore, apart from all the media hype and visual effects, Windows 8 is actually designed to run on currently available hardware – from desktop configurations, to tablets, to ultrabooks; while little can be said how it would run on devices that would appear within months. Hardware platforms and cloud services are accelerating at unparalleled pace recently, thus raising questions whether Windows 8 cloud capabilities are designed based on proper forecasts how the market would develop in the near future. Rivals Apple and Google already set foot on markets for personal music and photo collections introducing affordable cloud services to customers.

Microsoft is yet to launch such services, while the answer to the one million dollar question about the price of the cloud-enabled Windows 8 is still a mystery.

By Kiril Kirilov

SaaS Global Revenues to Grow 20% to $12 Billion in 2011, Gartner Report

SaaS Global Revenues to Grow 20% to $12 Billion in 2011, Gartner Report

North American companies are estimated to account for nearly 64 percent of global software-as-a-service (SaaS) revenue with their share slightly decreasing from 63.6 percent in 2011 to 60.8 percent in 2015, a report by Gartner, Inc. revealed. In 2011, global market for SaaS products would generate $12.1 billion, a growth of 20.7 percent year-over-year, the report said.

The United States are still the most attractive marketplace for SaaS providers, being the most developed market for such services. Evidently, North America is the largest single regional market with projected revenues totaling $7.7 billion in 2011, compared to $6.5 billion in the previous year, a growth of 18.7 percent year-over-year.

In North America, ease and speed of deployment are primary reasons for SaaS adoption, followed by lower TCO,” Sharon Mertz, research director at Gartner, said in a statement. “Limited capital expense is also considered more important in North America than in the other regions. Consistent with the other regions, CRM shows the highest use of SaaS among enterprise applications while use of Web conferencing, e-learning and travel booking is higher in North America than in the other regions,” she added.

According to her, the main drivers behind growing adoption rates of cloud-based solutions is increasing familiarity with the model, continued oversight on IT budgets, and the growth of platform as a service (PaaS) developer communities. European, Middle Eastern, and African markets (EMEA) are influenced mainly by total cost of ownership (TCO) when the matter in hand is to adopt cloud solutions, while SaaS adoption in North American and Asia/Pacific regions is boosted by ease of deployment. SaaS adoption rates are affected by lack of flexible customization in EMEA markets, and North American and Asia/Pacific customers experience problems related to limited integration to current business applications they use to run their businesses.

Western Europe is the second largest market in terms of SaaS revenue with regional revenues projected to increase by 23.3 percent annually, reaching $2.7 billion in 2011. Eastern European SaaS market revenue is forecast to grow 29.8 percent year-over-year to $131.4 million in 2011. Gartner experts estimate Eastern European SaaS market revenues would stay at $270.1 million in 2015.

The U.K., Ireland, the Netherlands and Nordic countries represent the most developed segment of Europe’s SaaS market, Mertz said, adding that the main factor behind those countries’ fast-growing SaaS adoption rates is well-established Internet infrastructure while little or no localization is required by North American software vendors to enter these particular markets.

Asia/Pacific would see regional SaaS revenue grow by 27.7 percent year-over-year, totaling $768.3 million in 2011, and exceeding the $1 billion mark by 2015. Gartner, forecast the region is to witness regional SaaS revenue hit $1.7 billion in 2015.

SaaS adoption is more prominent in the more mature markets in Asia/Pacific, such as Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Korea, because of their established infrastructure, such as more-stable networks, as well as the availability of vendor sales, marketing and support service structures. In many cases, the use of English as a common language in these countries, except in South Korea, makes them an attractive destination for foreign providers investing in the region,” Mertz said.

Latin American market for SaaS is expected to post revenues worth $328.4 million in 2011, growing 23.5 percent year-over-year, and increasing two-fold to $694.2 million in 2015.

A two-digit growth in most regions signals good years ahead for SaaS providers but a careful analysis of data provided by Gartner should take into account the basis from which every market starts to grow. North American market still shows huge potential but it would not grow as fast as Latin American markets due to higher SaaS penetration and other factors that prevent it from reaching the pace of growth of markets in less developed regions of the world.

By Kiril Kirilov

TMNG Global Introduces New Cloud Value Model

TMNG Global Introduces New Cloud Value Model

Hidden cloud migration costs are still a concern for smart corporate executives

TMNG Global introduced a new proprietary financial model called the Cloud Value Model(SM) that allows corporations and executives to measure actual costs and benefits originating from migration to the Cloud. The product is able to provide thorough analysis on potential cost savings before, during, and after migration to the Cloud, allowing corporate executives to work out more precise strategic plans and adopt cloud-based solutions based on carefully estimated return on investment, according to Rich Nespola, TMNG Global’s Chairman and CEO.

For many companies, the inability to accurately determine costs is a significant barrier to Cloud adoption. This is particularly true as it pertains to the comparison of legacy IT costs to the costs of new Cloud services,” Nespola said in a press release. “Our Cloud Value Model(SM)performs a comprehensive five-year end-to-end lifecycle analysis of IT operations, systems and applications, thereby quantifying both the hard and soft costs and benefits of moving to the Cloud for our clients,” he added.

The Overland Park, Kansas-based company has developed a product, enabling enterprise customers to measure all expected benefits from cloud migration in real financial terms, based on assessment of current overall IT costs that are gauged against those costs during migration to the Cloud and afterwards.

Corporate executives would be glad to use such a tool in taking decisions on cloud solutions adoption after a growing number of managers realize there are hidden costs of deployment of cloud-based solutions that are able to hamper overall positive effect of cloud solutions adoption. When migrating to the public cloud, a company should be ready to face significant costs related to tweaking existing applications to be able to run flawlessly in the Cloud. Actually, most relatively older but widespread business applications are not completely cloud-ready, requiring significant investment in additional software development if a company wants to move existing business applications to the Cloud.

Another aspect of the same problem is related to integration between traditional on-premise systems and cloud-based solutions that often requires specific interface and protocols to achieve full compatibility. Thus, an enterprise would be forced to invest heavily in integration software to take utmost advantage of cloud-based systems that usually utilize latest protocol versions and rely on most recent technology. In fact, this scenario brings benefits in the long run for companies are forced to shift to the most modern solutions available but can be burdening from a budgetary point of view.

If a company is adopting an exit plan scenario that envisages return of backed up data and services back on-premises in case of cloud provider failure to deliver, those additional costs are to be planned in advance and included in the overall assessment of cloud adoption costs. A clever approach to cloud migration, however, requires never relying on a sole solution and be prepared for emergencies that occur in the cloud. Taken as a whole, the Cloud is more secure in terms of protection against power failures and subsequent loss of data and provides reliable backup options. Nonetheless, recent inability of cloud giant Google to restore diminished content of numerous users of its Gmail web email service shows that even leading cloud providers can experience serious troubles restoring data and information regardless of what actually triggered the problem.

A company might incur further hidden expenditures if its managers are not aware that the process of migrating large volumes of corporate data to the Cloud is similar, in theory, to using Appple’s iCloud web service to store music online but can be very costly in practice due to specifics of price determination in the Cloud. Imagine a scenario where a cloud provider charges only 1 cent per GB uploaded to its remote storage servers but the cost of download is set at 10 cents per GB. A simple calculation shows that if your day-to-day business process requires the download of vast data volumes from a remote server it would not be very advantageous to use such service. We are yet to see whether the Cloud Value Model(SM) is able to evaluate such expenses in a usable and proper manner but executives should be aware that many of the obvious advantages of cloud-based solutions could be wiped out if adopted without proper and thorough costs analysis.

By Kiril Kirilov

Why The Cloud Is As Secure As Your PC

Why the Cloud Is As Secure

Recently, a great portion of hype in the technology sector is related to cloud computing security and reliability. Recent service interruptions experienced by leading cloud services providers like Amazon, in combination with security issues and credential leaks that occurred in services delivered by Sony and Google’s Android operating systems raised questions about the overall security and safety of cloud-based solutions.

There is no simple or straightforward answer to the question whether the Cloud is a secure place for storing data, conducting transactions and maintaining corporate databases. Moreover, one should distinguish between private, public and hybrid clouds used to store corporate data run business applications. Most security experts agree that cloud-based solutions are as secure as offline software and storage products and services that run in a corporate environment, on a corporate server and are isolated from external networks.

Actually, a private cloud i.e. most clouds deployed by enterprises, small and large ones alike, can experience downtime as often as public clouds like those offered by Google and Amazon, for example. Private, public and hybrid clouds utilize infrastructure, hardware and software that is similar to the ones used in corporate private networks; therefore, IT specialists face the same problems in a “traditional” and a cloud environment. Over 200,000 Google’s Gmail users saw their email accounts emptied in a day, loosing emails and other documentation they archived for years. However, corporate users could experience the same troubles should a company server crash, deleting data stored in their corporate email accounts. No one is insured against hardware faults and Google later admitted that the mysterious loss of data occurred due to a combination of hardware and software faults.

The human factor should not be underestimated, too.

Government agencies around the world avoid using cloud services offered by corporate providers because of the risks related to data leaks and data protection in the Cloud. Actually, most reputable providers of cloud services apply strict data and software access policies similar to those implemented by government bodies. On the other hand, data leaks within the government-run companies and agencies occur more frequently than information leaks originating from corporations. If an American sergeant managed to transfer sources to Wikileaks, thousands of classified government cables stored within the U.S. Army computer networks, one should bet that the same can happen to myriads of files and emails stored in public cloud services. The greatest danger is related to targeted attacks and business espionage while individual users should beware mostly of identity theft.

Reliability of cloud services is another issue that should be taken into account. A growing number of providers offer cloud services and products while Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) are now commonly used to reduce corporate costs. Other enterprises rely on Infrastructure-as-a-Service to run their business but in all these scenarios business depends on external resources to run smoothly their everyday operations.

Thus, reliability of cloud products and services is now a major issue while many IT specialists admit they are not convinced in the reliability of cloud solutions deployed within their respective organizations. For example, an enterprise greatly reduces its software licensing fees and payroll costs by deploying a cloud software platform but such a solution can cost dearly if the PaaS provider does not offer an acceptable reaction time in case of malfunctions and service faults.

Once again, the same troubles can occur in a “traditional” software environment where a platform is not supported in an appropriate manner or a company lacks experienced IT staff. Connection and processing speed is also a concern when the issue in hand is cloud computing but this can be subject to a separate article.

In reality, the Cloud is as secure and safe as is a personal computer connected to a closed corporate network, provided that the network is maintained by well-trained specialists and all available and applicable security and safety measures are implemented. No complete security is available in an interconnected environment where practically all devices and gadgets are able to connect to a sort of network.

Apart from imperfections offered by software and hardware, the human factor is still the main threat to security and safety in the Cloud.

By Kiril Kirilov

Cloud-adoption To Drive IT Products and Services Market in 2011, Report

Cloud-adoption To Drive IT Products and Services Market in 2011, Report

The public sector in the United States will spend less on IT products and services in 2011 while private sector enterprises are expected to purchase more IT products, a report by Business Monitor International (BMI) revealed. Cloud computing will drive the demand for such products and services with both private and public organizations looking for cloud-based solutions to benefit from cost-saving advantages offered by the Cloud.

The US market for IT products and services is forecast to expand to $653 billion by 2015 after sales dropped in last quarter of 2010. However, the growing demand for Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) will boost sales in 2011 and cloud computing will be a major market driving force in short-run, the report said. Local and federal government agencies introduced cloud strategies that will benefit providers of such services and the entire IT market while the federal government already introduced a detailed cloud adoption strategy.

Federal agencies like the US General Services Administration (GSA) have started to move email and other resources to the Cloud, paving the way for a major move to cloud computing at government level. In the past, federal government cautiously adopted such solutions due to security concerns. On the other hand, recent service breaches like those experienced by Amazon and other leading cloud services providers raised new security and reliability concerns that might affect the overall market development.

Salesforce retained its position as a leading and fast developing SaaS provider, adding 20,000 new customers in 2010, according to the report. Microsoft also witnessed a steady growth of its SaaS offerings with a number of public agencies selecting the company’s software solutions for their everyday work process.

The US software market is forecast to reach $154.6 billion in 2011, while growth is estimated to average 6 percent a year in 2011-2015, the report said. Demand for cloud-based solutions will drive the software market after a growing number of enterprises move to the Cloud or plan to adopt cloud computing solutions within their organizations. Recent surveys revealed that a prevailing number of business owners and managers plan to deploy cloud solutions to decrease costs. The lack of experienced cloud-adoption specialists, however, slows down the process, experts believe.

Notebooks account for over 60 percent of overall PC sales in 2001, according to the report, with smarthphones and tablets also gaining momentum rapidly. A total of 78 million PC units are expected to be shipped across the United States in 2010 but customers are spending less on new PCs, according to BMI experts.

The US IT services market is forecast to add 6 percent to $247.6 billion in 2001 while IT services is expected to be the fastest-growing market segment. Economic recovery and improving fundamentals related to overall state of the economy signal a new trend of growing IT services sales while hardware segment is expected to remain more calm.

Overall, cloud adoption by public and private organizations will drive the market in 2011 with providers competing for contracts by federal and local government agencies that are gradually deploying cloud-based solutions. The growing market for cloud products and services is expected to additionally support the present trend for emergence of relatively high number of cloud start-ups in the US. Most such start-ups focus on SaaS and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) segments, providing innovative solutions to compete with established market players like Amazon, Salesforce, Microsoft and Google.

By Kiril Kirilov

ScienceLogic Survey Finds Alarming Lack of Confidence in the Cloud

ScienceLogic Survey Finds Alarming Lack of Confidence in the Cloud

An alarming trend is reported among IT specialists attending Interop Las Vegas 2011, a survey by IT operations and cloud management solutions provider ScienceLogic, revealed. The company polled 150 professionals in Las Vegas and over two-thirds of them or 70 percent have admitted they do not have confidence in the strategy for managing cloud computing resources deployed by their respective companies.

At the same time, nearly 70 percent of the respondents are planning deployment of cloud-based solutions or already utilize a sort of cloud computing, the survey has found. Not surprisingly, 33 percent of those 70 percent are interested primarily in private or public clouds, 33 percent and 25 percent, respectively with hybrid clouds being deployed by only a minor part of all IT specialists representing various businesses. Only 14 percent of those polled are not interested in deploying cloud-based solutions and do not plan to take advantage of cost-related benefits offered by the cloud.

IT experts and businesses worldwide face serious challenges in adopting cloud computing solutions, though. Deployment of resources in the cloud is not so serious a problem today, however, managing these resources is not an easy task, specialists admit.

Cloud computing is growing fast and has become pervasive, but most businesses have great difficulty managing it along with their virtual and physical on-premises resources,” David Link, CEO of ScienceLogic, said in a statement. “It’s in vogue in some circles to downplay the need for IT operations with the advent of public cloud services, but few mid-to-large size organizations are relying exclusively on public clouds. Underestimating the need for IT operations can be a critical mistake. It has never been more important to have centralized, dynamic management of IT service delivery across distributed computing resources no matter where they reside.

Measuring cloud performance is another issue with over 33 percent of businesses polled admitting they are not sure how to measure this indicator. Moreover, over 70 percent are not confident their present cloud solutions or have not selected one, which is more than alarming in terms of cloud adoption development. Security and bandwidth is another area of cloud computing that troubles the sleep of organizations which plan to adopt cloud solutions or already deployed one. Most companies are concerned about unauthorized use of compute resources by business units or application developers, the survey revealed.

The lack of confidence in existing cloud management strategies demonstrated by businesses is alarming because the cloud is yet to mature and developing a whole new industry without confidence is doomed to failure. Nevertheless, the very fact that an overwhelming majority of businesses are already adopting cloud-based solutions or plan to do so is encouraging while business owners and senior managers should reconsider their cloud adoption strategies and management strategies. The cloud offers perfect environment for reducing costs, lowering network traffic and outsourcing some activities or data storing resources but deployment of cloud solutions should be subject to a thorough analysis and assessment.

Strategy is the key in deploying new technologies like cloud computing and the lack of prepared cloud experts already forces enterprises to start training in-house cloud specialists instead of relying on external professionals or advisers. Training a new cloud expert or re-training existing ones can be a winning formula for many small and medium businesses lacking financial resources to attract established cloud experts. This is also a method to overcome the confidence crisis related to cloud management while creating winning in-house cloud strategies.

By Kiril Kirilov

LastPass Possibly Hacked, Cloud Security Concerns on the Rise

LastPass Possibly Hacked, Cloud Security Concerns on the Rise

Conspiracy theory admirers will be happy to hear the news that today, following Amazon’s outage and recent security breaches at Sony, cloud-based password storage and management company LastPass announced a possible successful hacker’s attack against its servers.

If you have a strong, non-dictionary-based password or pass phrase, this shouldn’t impact you – the potential threat here is brute-forcing your master password using dictionary words, then going to LastPass with that password to get your data. Unfortunately not everyone picks a master password that’s immune to brute-forcing,” the company wrote in a blog post as cited by The Register.

To counter that potential threat, we’re going to force everyone to change their master passwords. Additionally, we’re going to want an indication that you’re you, by either ensuring that you’re coming from an IP block you’ve used before or by validating your email address…We realize this may be an overreaction and we apologize for the disruption this will cause, but we’d rather be paranoid and slightly inconvenience you than to be even more sorry later,” the blog post added.

LastPass’s security experts discovered unusual behaviour of their database server with more traffic going out compared to incoming data. Therefore, company’s specialists decided that such behaviour could be signalling a hackers’ activity related to siphoning out stored login credentials and other sensitive user data. The company decided to reset user master passwords in an attempt to protect customers from possible data leakage.
Actually, the web-based password-management company did not confirm that any sensitive user data have been stolen until now but chances are great that following unusual database server activity some users might witness their master passwords compromised. Master passwords are passwords that protect lists of passwords used to access other websites and online services in the cloud.

The company already announced it will enhance encryption algorithms used in protecting customers’ data and will introduce additional measures to secure sensitive data on its servers. LastPass’s experts are rumoured to suspect the hackers took advantage of the company’s VoIP service to get access to the company’s database and start extracting data. However, just a small amount of data had been extracted, so LastPass users should not be over-reacting to the news.

LastPass had experienced similar problems in the past with users not being affected by data leakage at the time of the previous security breach. Alarmingly, such accidents are becoming a routine in 2011 rising serious doubts whether users should take cloud security for granted. Both large corporations and start-up cloud companies experience the same kind of security problems, resembling past accidents that have troubled corporate and individual customers in the past. One would say that hackers’ activity is subject to the same fundamental factors that drive the stock market cycles unless global recession increasing number of hacking attempts are developing concurrently.

Obviously, tech community members should re-think their vision on cloud security and how these problems should be resolved.

By Kiril Kirilov

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Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Education Tech and the Cloud Arguably one of society’s most important functions, teaching can still seem antiquated at times. Many schools still function similarly to how they did five or 10 years ago, which is surprising considering the amount of technical innovation we’ve seen in the past decade. Education is an industry ripe for innovation…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…