Author Archives: Scott Andersen

Combining IoT Gizmo Kits With Your 3D Printer

Combining IoT Gizmo Kits With Your 3D Printer

IoT and 3D Printing

The 3D printer in my cubicle keeps printing name tags without my name and only cube number instead—should I be worried about this?

Imagine a future where an “organizational” 3D printer is stationed in every cube. You are working away on a project, when suddenly the printer comes to life. You remotely check it from time to time, just to see what it is printing. As the object begins to take shape, you recognize it to be a nameplate. Eventually, you see your cube number, but a different name has been printed on the nameplate. Am I unemployed? Am I moving to a new cube? These are just a few questions which may come to mind. Something like this situation could very well happen, and maybe sooner than you might think. I have been using 3D printers for more than four years now, and during that time, I have learned several lessons about 3D materials, printing and ultimately how to start getting up to speed on this amazing tech. First off, there are many 3D printers out there in the market right now.

You can purchase printers that sit in your home and print just about anything you can imagine. You can send a picture of yourself off, and get a 3D print of you. Alternatively, there are companies that offer print services where you send them what you want printed and they print it and send it back to you in a matter of days.

Why, then am I talking about this market and technology on a site that focuses primarily on Big data, Cloud and IoT, you may be asking? Well, that is a very interesting question. The first part of that question is simply that 3D printing is a very intriguing market. For small companies which either create or are considering creating new products, a 3D printer can help them move their dream quickly forward. Building architects can easily print out their designs in three dimensions. No more hours of model building; simply create the 3D file and print your building. Making massive changes to your fleet of planes? That’s ok, create the 3D file again and print away.

In the growing world of new and innovative IoT creations and objects, a 3D printer is a great starting point to launch your idea. You can print the object you are considering to help achieve proof of concept. Then, you can iterate the case, the boards and all of the component pieces. You can design precisely how everything fits together. And you can easily figure out how much will actually fit in your creation.

All of this and more helps innovators perform rapid prototyping and save a lot of time and energy in the process. It allows for the real-time changes in your innovation, which in turn helps it move to production faster (in theory, of course). You can also get printable material that conducts electricity; with the use of a 3D printer or pen, you can print in metal or flexible plastic, and with some of the 3D pens, you can even create a Henna-style tattoo on a person (there are pens that print cool – you cannot use a regular 3D pen on a human, for it would not only burn their skin, but isn’t designed to “stick” onto the skin in the first place).

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Now, the question is: Will a 3D printer be the centerpiece of the home of tomorrow? I’ve seen various future living spaces featuring 3D printers, and I am not convinced that in the majority of people will have one of these things in their living rooms. I do think a number of 3D printers will exist, however. For the most part , the price is far too high now for most people to invest and have one in their home. But in the next few years, we could see a drop in prices to help make 3D printers more of a mainstay in homes and small businesses.

Where I see this technology really making a huge impact—beyond increasing the velocity of innovation itself—is in schools and universities. There are IoT toolkits you can buy right now that include the “guts” of IoT connections, like Bluetooth, Raspberry PI, Wi-Fi and even cellular connections to cloud-based controls. Combine these IoT gizmo kits with a 3D printer, and you now have the capacity to create IoT devices that include custom forms.  Imagine a robot that resembles a Labrador Retriever or a tiny lamp that actually lights up on its own. These are just a few examples of creations that even younger students can dream up.

iot-lamp

So, while I believe there probably won’t be a 3D printer in every living room anytime soon, I do think there will be many 3D-printed objects we can use in our everyday lives. If you wander the various internet sites that offer you 3D objects you can print on demand, or the various companies that have created books to create 3D objects with 3D pens, you will find almost anything you could possibly want to print and use. For schools, inventors, building architects and people that simply dream in all three dimensions, the awesome reality of 3D printing is nearly here.

Now, if someone could direct me to the nearest body shop that can 3D print a fender for my newly dented car, I would be thrilled!

By Scott Andersen

Connecting the Power of IoT

Connecting the Power of IoT

Connection Power

I come not to bury Caesar. Nor do I come to bury his estimates. Estimates, attempts based on data filled with holes to produce a best-guess scenario. Start with how you gather data and from there how you determine what the risks are going forward. Estimation is tough, so you want to caveat your assumptions. You want to make sure you are on the low side, not on the high side.

Alternatively, you can be slightly on the high side, but not way over-estimating the change or impact. So it is my exception that in fact the estimates published so far for Internet of Things solutions are low. The question though isn’t that they are low, but rather by how much.

3D Printing

So a couple of meanderings first… A connected car would count as X number of IoT devices. I say X number here because at this point there really isn’t a standard and frankly every car has different levels of IoT connectivity. If your car has a device that connects to your cellular phone, that counts as one IoT connection. If you have a second connection in your car that is linked to a manufacturer, that represents a second IoT connection. Between those two connections however, you could have nearly 100 IoT sensors. This would include automatic braking, cruise control and lane control, just to name a few. There is also the broader concepts of crash and report sensors—when the airbags deploy, the car automatically calls 911.

Geek Connection

(Geez, he is meandering all over the place. What’s the point?) Well first, I would like to mention that I personally am a geek. I have begun the process of automating my home. I have connected TV’s and many other connected devices available today. In fact, I now have over 100 connected devices currently in my home. The reason I am bringing up this number has to do with the fact that I know there are MANY people that have more IoT devices deployed in their homes than I do.

I also happen to know you always throw out the highest end when providing an estimate. If your basis of the estimate is on the high-end, you will invariably become frustrated. This is mostly because the high-end isn’t a true overall number. Still, there are between 2.5 and 3 billion cellular phones on the planet today. If we take industrial, government and home IoT devices and add in the cellular phones, this number is greater than 12 billion worldwide. My basis for this is the logical breakdown of the numbers.

The IoT POWER Users

First off, I think analysts missed the high-end of power users when it comes to IoT devices. Even if we remove the outliers, we still have a large population, maybe as high as 500 million people with more than 12 devices per member of the household on average. Just this population and deployed cellular devices (also IoT devices) would come out to between 7.5-8 billion deployed devices. There are between 2-3 million deployed cameras for business and home security in New York City alone, so this number would likely rise to closer to 20 billion IoT devices actually deployed in the global market today.

New York

By the way, you probably remember that I opened with the fact that I didn’t come to bury Caesar. I understand why the analysts choose to publish lower numbers. My numbers come with an inherent risk. I could be wrong. I could be off by a factor of .2 or even .3. Even with this margin of error, I still think the published numbers are on the low side. My gut in playing with and laying what I believe the real numbers to be is that the analysts are off by 50% today. I believe there are between 18 and 22 billion IoT devices deployed right now. Depending on how things move, by 2020, this number will be closer to 100 billion deployed devices.

Noise to Ratio

Frankly, I worry a bit based on the reality of these numbers, and that’s why I started evaluating this. I believe home networks are going to be the first to topple. First off, it is fairly easy to crack most home routers, and secondly because they are not made to support the load of all these new IoT devices. The noise-to-signal ratio in an overused home network will allow more and more hacks to go undetected for longer periods of time.

SO, the risk is that the home network becomes saturated and falls over. This presents significant risk for businesses, as every employee that works from home presents a new and potentially hard-to-catch security leak. When friends ask what can I do to prevent this, I always tell them this simple answer: Go and buy a new Wi-Fi router. Create an easy password for the networks on that router and plug it directly into your router. Then only connect IoT devices in your home to that network. You can still get all the data from the IoT devices that you want. But now, you have a separate network segment that will reduce total bandwidth consumed. And if something happens, you can unplug that router from the internet. The best security strategy for Internet-connected devices remains from removing the Internet connection.

I come not to bury Caesar, but I would like to know where he keeps his IoT devices!

By Scott Anderson

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

IoT Device Failures

I have, over the past three years, posted a number of Internet of Things (and the broader NIST-defined Cyber Physical Systems) conversations and topics. I have talked about drones, wearables and many other aspects of the Internet of Things.

One of the integration problems has been the number of protocols the various devices use to communicate with one another. The rise of protocol gateways in the cloud service provider market is an incredibly good thing. Basically, this allows an organization to map sensors and other IoT/CPOS device outputs to a cloud gateway that will connect, transfer and communicate with the device – regardless of the device’s protocol of choice.

Racing out of the Gate

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What the new gateways do is remove integration as a stumbling block for ongoing and future IoT solutions. Pick the wrong horse in the initial protocol race? With a gateway, it doesn’t matter. You can, over time, replace the devices deployed with the orphaned protocol and move forward with your system. The cloud service provider protocol gateway gives you the flexibility to also consider deploying multiple types of sensors and protocols, instead of limiting your organization to one.

The question going forward is this: does the integration provided by the gateway give rise to the broader concept of an IoT broker? This is where the services offered by IoT devices could be parsed out and shared within organizations and companies that are members of the broker. Think of it as being like a buyer’s club for sensors.

From my perspective, the issue that keeps me awake at night is IoT device security. For the most part, IoT devices are often ‘fire and forget’. Yes, occasionally, you may have to change a battery or replace a cellular connection. Sometimes you may have to update how the device is deployed. Others just aren’t going to be attacked because you won’t gain anything. I read an article that wrote about hacking the river monitoring system, causing a flood downstream. I thought about that for a long time, and I realized the reality of flooding is we know when it coming and everyone would be out there with manual measurements anyway. That would work. There are other ways to create an effective attack through the IoT.

It is the security of IoT devices that will become more and more troublesome. Firstly, because the number of them is growing rapidly. From 10 billion or so deployed in 2015 to more than 40 billion devices deployed by 2020. That’s 4 times the devices in the next 4 years.

If we consider the reality of devices, that means that many devices that are deployed today will still be deployed in 4 years. The cost of devices and often the capital expenses for hardware are spread over 3 to 5 years. That means a growing number of devices will be already deployed by 2020. It isn’t a run to the cliff and then leap into 40 billion deployed devices.

2 Billion Device Failures

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What scares me is that there are 10 billion or so devices deployed today. Logically, 2 billion of them will fail. 2 billion more will be replaced naturally. That leaves 6 billion devices deployed with the security solutions of today – that will rapidly become obsolete. That is a fairly expensive number to replace. The gateways mentioned earlier in this article will suddenly appear again. Today, they represent a way to bring multiple IoT protocols together. In the future, they will become the best line of defense for deployed devices.

Deploying secure solutions at the gateway level will be the best defense against attacks for IoT devices that do not have integrated security. The next-best thing would be the deployment of devices with easily removed security modules, but that is a consideration for upcoming devices – not ones deployed today.

A secure IoT future – enabled by a simple cloud gateway.

By Scott Andersen

Tweaking with Application Assessment Tools

Tweaking with Application Assessment Tools

Application Assessment

We have all seen the TV commercial where impossible situations are solved quickly by simply pressing a button market “Easy.” For many organizations, the cloud presents a difficult transition. Over the past few years as a consultant helping organizations consider cloud computing, I have developed a number of useful tools to help customers make the leap.

A number of the tools I’ve developed have nothing to do with technology, or they are focused more on the business reality of the organization, not the technical reality. In fact, I have a tools-based process to help customers take a look at their environment and ultimately get to where they want to be. One of the tools I have been working with for the past five years is that of Application Assessment.

Many years ago I developed an application assessment process. That process was designed to map organization requirements to application capabilities in order to produce a view of what an organization really needed to migrate. There is another piece to that process that hasn’t been published until now –the concept of application improvement.

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As you move applications from your on-premise data center to the cloud, the first thing you are told is to prepare or “cloudify” the application, where cloudify represents enabling the components of cloud applications that traditional on-premise applications don’t normally have (unless it is a cloud app running on premise for whatever reason). This tool involves starting with questions for IT and the business about the application.

Spinning of Wheels

The concept and the process are holistic. The goal is to see your application end to end. It is possible, as you consider your application, to consider components. In considering components of your application it is possible that you can speed up any one component. The example would be a motorcycle. Whereas an improvement, you can speed up the front wheel of the motorcycle. This would allow the front wheel to spin faster than the rear wheel. However, the result would be that either the governor for the rear wheel would overheat and seize, or the governor would burn out and you wouldn’t be able to apply brakes to the rear wheel. In either case, you wouldn’t speed up the motorcycle and the process improvement would lead to additional repairs.

Speed up both wheels by reducing friction when the brakes aren’t applied and you will speed up that motorcycle.  The holistic approach then takes a view of the application and what it touches. This overall process has a number of tools that gather the data you will need for this particular tool. The goal of this tool is to evaluate specific applications and the impact of speeding up all, or part, of that specific application. The intent of this tool is not to gather data, but rather to impact the process of determining whether or not we can speed up a specific application.

1. What are the components of the application overall?

2. What are the components that wait for other components in either assisting or building this applications output?

3. Can we speed up the components that produce wait times in the application overall?

4. If we speed up the components that delay the application now, will the overall application speed up?

The last one is the most important of the four; the first three give us the possible answers and the last one gives us the final answer. Again our goal is not to speed up the front wheel of our application motorcycle but to speed up the entire motorcycle.

Knowing the long-term goals of the organization and the overall capabilities of every application makes the transition easier. Good luck – and remember don’t speed something up because you can. Speed applications up because it makes your entire process faster. Nothing is worse than waiting for data. Data that waits for use is out of date.

By Scott Andersen

IoTT, The Internet of Things, Tomorrow

IoTT, The Internet of Things, Tomorrow

What Should Your Home Be Telling You?

Home. The place where you lay your head to sleep, where a roof of some form protects you. It’s where you leave the things that are valuable to you as you head off each day to live your life. If you were to strike up a conversation with your home about its day, what information would you like your home to convey to you? How would you like to get that information? These walls can’t talk.

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(Infographic Source: deloitte.com)

There is a value to real time information, things you want to know about as soon as possible. Examples of this from your house would be things like smoke detection and security. You need to know right away if your house is on fire or someone is trying to break in. Critical information should be delivered using a persistent messaging system that won’t stop until you verify receipt. Think of what a great excuse you’ll always have: “I am sorry I have to leave this very exciting meeting because my home is paging me that someone is trying to break into the house.” Forget those fake phone calls and made up excuses.

Less critical conversations can also take place, informing you of what’s in the refrigerator and even information on the products inside. Imagine being at the grocery store and being able to remotely look inside of your refrigerator. Refrigerators of today feature cameras inside as well as barcode readers that can tell you specific information about products like expiration date, price, nutritional information, product reviews, and more.

With the Internet of Things, you’ll never forget the milk again.

IoT-CloudTweaks-Comic

Given these preliminary conversations, what should your house be talking to you about?

  • Home Security – remote connection to video surveillance systems and sensors
  • Critical information – Fire alarms, burglar alarms, leaking pipes, electrical outages and other critical pieces of information
  • Home Information – Non-essential information like replacing air and furnace filters, refilling the egg tray, temperature, energy use, and pet-information
  • Environmental Information – Particulate and dust levels in the air, CO2, Radon, and other harmful gas detection

All of these home information systems are available today via their individual systems. What the Internet of Things will do is provide seamless control and notification across all aspects of your home’s functions, in a single platform. This will soon become a reality, so get used to receiving text messages from your house. It all sounds useful until your house starts sending you Baseball picks and you’re forced to write a book: “Conversations with my House: Why I stopped Changing my Furnace Filter.

By Scott Andersen

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality

This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success!

Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon take me away. The concept was simple, a mother or father frustrated with their day (and their children) whisked away by the wonderful Calgon bathing product. By soaking in the tub, all the troubles disappeared. Imagine having a really tough meeting. You walk back to your cube and wander off to the most beautiful place on earth (at least for you). You finish your working day enjoying a picnic in the foothills of the alps. Or you wander around your favorite shopping center. Virtual immersion offers so many possible ways to get away from where you are, while still being able to finish the things you have to do!

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By clicking a button your cube becomes Waikiki beach in Hawaii or for the adventurous types, the main campus of the NSF Antarctic expedition. For people with fear you could help them gradually reduce that fear by introducing them to an environment with what they fear in it. But it would be an immersive environment that they knew was safe going in. So the fear could slowly be increased until it wasn’t as much of a fear.

Connected Sensations

The concept of Virtual Immersion© would be one step beyond Virtual Reality. Not only the auditory and visual experience but smells, feelings and sensations.  For young drives you would equip an immersive suite with a driving unit that responded similarly to a real car and let them loose. They wouldn’t ever hit anyone because it was a virtual road but they could learn about how to drive in rain and snow.  Instead of giving out tickets the police could pull people over for speeding and have them take a mandatory (right then) Virtual Immersion© defensive driving class. Or why not to drive in the HOV lane with only one person in the car. (or is that last one a counting issue, me, myself and I, Well I can use the HOV lane I have three people in the car).

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Virtual Immersion© opens the door for family experiences. JIBO is a device built to aid elderly people who want to be independent. You could, with Virtual Immersion© be right there with your loved ones no matter where in the world you live. Surgeons could be there, experiencing the actual smells in the operating room (I think you nicked his bowel). Hospice organizations could offer a Virtual Immersion© experience for those that cannot travel as their loved one is passing. The value proposition for education, the ability of the remote instructor to see the faces, body language and behavior of the remote students. Perhaps a Virtual Immersion© (and uncomfortable) principal’s office for students that aren’t taking the instructors seriously.

The doors that this opens are amazing. I can’t thank the inspiration for this idea enough. The reality of Virtual Immersion© is the integration that could quickly be built into an IoT environment that supported the concept. A shirt with heating and cooling coils built in. A smell generator that allowed you to generate the smells of your favorite locations. An immersed future where everything would be possible.

Space Journey 

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Want to experience outer space without, well the 3-day trip through space? Or for that matter virtually anywhere we can launch the VI apparatus. Movie experiences could be more real. You, right there with the main characters, smelling and feeling the same experiences. Walking out of the theater soaked in sweat. “Did you just run here?” A friend you bump into on the way out asks. “No” you answer “I just saw the new VI Dinosaur experience movie.

It will whisk you away from a bad day at work, by turning your cube into someplace you want to be. IT will increase productivity by allowing people to work in an environment that stimulates and encourages them to be productive. VI makes VR personal.

Plus, you won’t have to wonder what the bottom of the ocean smells like anymore, I mean if you do wonder that.

By Scott Anderson

Connecting Cars To The Cloud

The Cloud Connection

Cars are becoming more and more connected. There are many YouTube videos of people seizing control of a car remotely and forcing it to operate in unexpected ways. But overall the reality of connection is good. As machines extend human functions we are better off.

That said, I was thinking about automation and cars yesterday. First because I am teaching my sons how to drive (they are also taking drivers education, but I am doing the initial driving lessons with them). When I learned to drive (let’s just say 3 years ago) I learned on a manual transmission Volkswagen Beetle. A car that didn’t have power steering, anti-lock brakes or for that matter climate controlled temperature systems. In the winter you rolled the window up and hoped the tiny bit of warm air escaping from the heater would raise the temperature to just above freezing. In the summer you rolled the windows down, and turned the music up. The FM radio wasn’t included in the package, so you only had AM radio to enjoy.

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(Image Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

Automation, including lane protection and speed controls are incredible tools. The power that it gives the driver is simply amazing. I do, a tiny bit, however wish I could teach my sons in a car that wasn’t fully automated. There are things you need a person for in order to understand the impact.

That got me thinking about the impact of automated systems going forward. Not from a science fiction perspective where people forget how to fix things and engineers take over the world. Rather from the separation of essential skills and automation.

What are the essential skills people need in the automated world?

The easy ones are the so-called soft skills. Communication skills we all need to have to be effective in our interactions. But what skills do we need overall in that automated age beyond the easy answer? Early in my career we used to talk about technical people that were an inch wide and a mile deep. They were focused on building solutions that were an inch wide but needed that depth to be effective. We talked about software architects as being a mile wide and an inch deep. We needed both in order for the system to operate within the IT environment but also be effective for the users. Now, in a world where automation makes everyone a mile wide, what skills beyond are we going to need?

connected-cars

Let’s go back for a moment to the connected car to answer this question. First off, connected cars have evolved. I remember the days of the device (GPS) having a speaker, and you added that to your car. Or a device that plugged into your cassette deck or audio in on your car to play cellular conversations through the car speakers. That evolved into the integrated systems that we have today. Understanding how those systems came to be is an important skill. Understanding the path to a solution is as important as understanding where the solution is now. Understanding how you got to where you are, is skill one.

If we consider the connected car the second skills is understanding or clarifying the why of the solution. For example car phones exploded in many states because it became illegal to hold your cellular phone while driving. So there are legal reasons you have a specific solution. Hands free phones were a legal requirement. Connected cars of tomorrow (or possibly the actual cellular device) won’t allow you to text and drive. Many cars now can read you your texts and allow you to reply via voice. Siri can do that as well as Cortana and Google can. The asking the right questions to get to why will (are) critical skills in the connected world.

The Automated World

Skills for the connected (automated world) understand the path to the solution. Understand why the solution was implemented. It seems so easy when you lay them out like that. The reality is much harder. The answer to the first question is an integration of what and how. What we did, how we did it to solve the problem documented and available. The second why, is usually the easier question to ask but skill remains elusive if you don’t fully understand what was done and how it was done. To bring this full circle I wonder if my sons (and for that matter all the young drivers now) will fully understand how to operate the vehicle they are driving.  Anti-lock brakes reduce the risk of braking while driving. Connected cellular phones make it safer to drive and talk to people. Integration of car and cell phone make it safer on the roads.

But what happens when the system fails?

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(Image Source: OlgaLis / Shutterstock)

When the system fails is when knowing what was built, how it was built and why it was built becomes a critical skill. Perhaps a parking lot button for teaching young drivers so I can turn off the automation in a safe place and teach my sons how to drive manually. There is something about understanding the motion point of a car. The balance of acceleration and releasing the clutch to engage the gears slowly. Of course there is also something about my car warning me when there is someone in the lane I want to turn into. There is something more, when it won’t let me turn into the lane because the car is in my blind spot.

So manual button for empty parking lots only!

By Scott Andersen

What Agency Can Benefit The Most From IoT/CSP?

What Agency Can Benefit The Most From IoT/CSP?

What Agency Can Benefit The Most?

I was recently giving a talk to some students when one of them asked me a question I hadn’t heard before. She said “How does the Internet of Things really impact the government? What agency benefits the most from IoT/CPS?” I paused for a moment, it is a great question and deserves a good answer.

My initial response was simple “it vastly improves physical security and extends physical security much further away from buildings using drones and other remote sensors. You can now have a supportable security parameter that is much larger than you could 5 or 6 years ago.”

It was the easy answer. I felt a little guilty for using it, but it was a tough question. But she wasn’t done “I’ve heard that one before, I wonder what the impact of IoT will actually be on the government.”

I thought back to the articles I had written here on CloudTweaks. The modular drone concept of a few months ago. The Pizza Drone concept, I could see an IRS tax collection drone following people around. The metallic voice blaring “you owe taxes, you owe taxes.”

taxes-drone

The huge IoT impact point in the next couple of years will be in the world of data. The production of, consumption of and analysis of data produced by sensors. Many government agencies have already embraced Cyber Physical Systems (IoT) and continue to push further and further into the world of data production, movement and analyses.

I doubt the IRS tax collection drone is coming soon. But I can see canary drones. A canary drone has air sensors built in and can either follow a group of people or lead them. For people doing volcanic research where poisonous gas can appear and poison you, a Canary Drone is a good safety system. We could paint them a bright yellow, just because of the name.

Safety and security wise there are a number of drone features that will be leveraged by government agencies. But beyond that, beyond the sensors we know about today what else is possible? Today I can grab a number of accelerometers and in having access to them remotely use that for ground movement verification. Want to see if somebody set off a nuclear bomb? Have access to all the accelerometers near the site of the test explosion. They will inform you quickly of ardent shaking.

I continued thinking about this. I discarded the espionage opportunities because that isn’t fun and has been beaten to death by television anyway. What else could CPS/IoT devices do for government? The Government’s job is to deliver services to citizens. What IoT/CPS devices actually deliver direct citizen services?

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

That got me thinking about the expanding world of healthcare devices that are out there. Final answer, government agencies can use IoT/CPS devices to capture more information than they are able to today and in so capturing (storing and analyzing) that data they will be able to improve the quality of the citizen services they deliver.

It’s a good, and true answer. The healthcare information alone will provide massive new insight to how humans react to illness, what happens when a sick co-worker decides to come to work anyway and the other components of the Internet of Illness. Using remote IoT/CPS health sensors will also provide the CDC, NIH and other government agencies with a massive amount of information as to how specific diseases actually move as they spread.

Many agencies created an internet for the many sensors they deployed long before there was an actual internet. The Unlisted States Geological Survey has had an internet of things for many years. Long before people even realized you should let alone could connect remote sensors to central systems. Packet radio networks and satellite connections were the quick way to data to the central processing system. As things get faster, they can deploy more sensors and get an even larger snapshot of geologic events.

The questioner looked at me for a second and smiled. I had answered her question. What government agency will benefit from IoT/CPS, all of them!

By Scott Andersen

CloudTweaks Comics
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Fintech Investments Are Seeing Consistent Growth

The Financial Services Cloud Fintech investment has been seeing consistent growth in 2015, with some large moves being made this year. The infographic (Courtesy of Venturescanner) below shows the top Fintech investors and the amount of companies they’re currently funding: Just this week, a financial data startup known as Orchard Platform raised $30 million in…

Protecting Your Web Applications In A Hybrid Cloud Environment

Protecting Your Web Applications In A Hybrid Cloud Environment

Protecting Your Web Applications It’s no secret that organizations are embracing the cloud and all the benefits that it entails. Whether its cost savings, increased flexibility or enhanced productivity – businesses around the world are leveraging the cloud to scale their business and better serve their customers. They are using a variety of cloud solutions…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

Digital Marketing Hubs And The Cloud

Digital Marketing Hubs And The Cloud

Digital Market Hubs Gartner’s recently released research, Magic Quadrant for Digital Marketing Hubs, recognizes the big four marketing cloud vendors as leaders, but also points to many challengers. Adobe, Marketo, Oracle, and Salesforce inhabit the leader’s block of the Magic Quadrant, reflecting both their growing capabilities as well as marketing technology platform scopes. Gartner believes…

The Storytelling Machine: Big Content and Big Data

The Storytelling Machine: Big Content and Big Data

Bridging The Gap Between Big Content and Big Data Advances in cloud computing, along with the big data movement, have transformed the business IT landscape. Leveraging the cloud, companies are now afforded on demand capacity and mobile accessibility to their business-critical systems and information. At the same time, the amount of structured and unstructured data…

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Paying Attention To Data Security Your biggest data security threat could be sitting next to you… Data security is a big concern for businesses. The repercussions of a data security breach ranges from embarrassment, to costly lawsuits and clean-up jobs – particularly when confidential client information is involved. But although more and more businesses are…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Cloud Architecture These days, Multi-Tier Applications are the norm. From SharePoint’s front-end/back-end configuration, to LAMP-based websites using multiple servers to handle different functions, a multitude of apps require public and private-facing components to work in tandem. Placing these apps in entirely public-facing platforms and networks simplifies the process, but at the cost of security vulnerabilities. Locating everything…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…