Category Archives: Big Data

The Fundamental Uses Of Cloud Computing

The Fundamental Uses Of Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing Fundamentals

Cloud Computing covers a range of IT entities working together: Hardware such as servers, PCs, tablets and mobile phones; Infrastructure including networks and block storage; Platforms handling object storage, databases, identities and runtime; and Applications for providing content, monitoring, collaboration, and communication. To fully understand Cloud Computing, you’ll need a grasp of its core characteristics, the different service and deployment models, and also realise that mitigating glitches and complications is part of the Cloud Computing process. There’s a lot to learn, including Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), but once you’ve done the groundwork you’ll be able to experiment with Cloud software from major providers such as Amazon’s AWS, Google AppEngine, and Windows Azure.

Fundamentals: Practical Examples


All of the elaborate Cloud Computing tools available work according to the same principles as simplistic, and often free, tools already at your fingertips.

  • Google Docs: Access to a free Google Docs account is available to everyone, and provides you with free sharing and real-time editing tools. Set up your account and create and share documents with others to experience real-time collaboration the Cloud offers.
  • Providing many connectors to extend storage functionality, Box accounts can also be tied to your LinkedIn account, allowing those viewing your profile to download documents from your store. Moreover, its fax connectors connect the Cloud to your physical machinery at home or in the office.
  • Salesforce for Intuit QuickBooks: For an experience of business management in the Cloud, set up a free account and upload your own customer lists to connect customer relationship Salesforce with QuickBooks accounting software.
  • Windows Live Mesh: Remotely control Windows and Mac desktops, synchronise files between computers, and standardize your bookmarks and favourites. This hybrid application provides you with insight into where Microsoft is moving with some of its live cloud-based services.
  • Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2): Once you’re a little more confident, try setting up a server on Amazon’s EC2. Though initial setup can be somewhat cumbersome, a wide range of features are available.
  • Cloudshare: For a simpler experience try setting up two Windows machines on Cloudshare. The free trial period and easy setup allow the connection of two machines via their own cloud networks, also offering access to them via remote desktop connections.

Free Cloud Computing Courses

For those preferring a more structured course of learning, a range of free online courses are on offer:

  • edX & UC BerkeleyX: Take part in a series of courses on Engineering Software as a Service. Topics covered include engineering solid high-performance cloud applications using agile technique, Software as a Service (SaaS) application using Ruby on Rails, deploying applications in the cloud, and enhancing performance using JavaScript.
  • Coursera and Vanderbilt University: Programming Cloud Services for Android Handheld Systems includes instruction on applying patterns and frameworks to develop scalable and secure cloud services, and covers mobile and cloud communication, concurrency and synchronization, data persistence, synchronous and asynchronous event handling, and security.
  • Google Developer Academy: This e-learning site offers a solid overview of Google AppEngine, Python App Engine and Google+ APIs.
  • Microsoft Research Windows Azure for Research Training: Aimed at academicians and researchers, this learning platform targets the Microsoft Windows Azure Platform.
  • MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) : OCW is a web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content, a comprehensive collections of courseware available globally.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Is Your Office 365 Data Properly Protected?

Is Your Office 365 Data Properly Protected?

 Office 365 Data Security

As more and more people collaborate and access data from outside the office and across multiple devices, the potential for SaaS data loss increases dramatically, and the damage can be catastrophic. A staggering 60 percent of companies that lose critical data shut down within six months of the loss incident, according to research from Boston Computing Network.


saasOne productivity tool – Microsoft Office 365 – has become the talk of the town recently, and is a great example to illustrate the importance of proper data protection. Over the last 12 months, Microsoft has seen an uptick in companies of all sizes signing up. A notable example is General Electric, which announced it will be implementing the platform across its business. It’s easy to see why so many organizations are moving toward cloud-based SaaS applications like Office 365 – they are secure, convenient and easy to set up and manage. Moreover, they enable a workforce to move faster, collaborating across offices around the world and other remote locations, all while reducing operational costs.

But there is a common misconception about SaaS data that mustn’t be ignored: and that is that Office 365 data can’t be lost. The truth is, your Office 365 data is probably not properly protected and may be at risk.

Protecting Data

Microsoft does an amazing job protecting data from any data loss risks on their side – including disaster recovery, server outages, etc. They make sure that your data is available, as long as you have requested them to do so. However, what Microsoft can’t do is protect your data from you. That’s not a typo. They can’t protect users from accidentally deleting data or an administrator from maliciously deleting important docs within Office 365.

Take the move from on-premises Microsoft Exchange to Office 365 as an example. Administrators go from managing basically everything (network, hardware, OS, VMs, etc.) to only overseeing the policies, users and data. In this new environment, the responsibility for data protection is shared between an application administrator and Microsoft. As long as data loss is caused by a hardware or data center availability issue, Microsoft maintains responsibility, but Microsoft maintains responsibility and must adhere to the requests of users. If there is an external hack or internal malicious behavior, like a disgruntled admin deleting files, the responsibility falls solely on the customer. In some ways, this is actually a good thing because if SaaS providers like Microsoft didn’t delete data when requested by users, then there would be major questions regarding privacy.

Mitigation and Litigation


Now, Microsoft does suggest some options to help mitigate damage, like litigation hold for all email, but those are not the best solutions for companies that want to ensure their employees’ data is not only available and safe, but quickly and easily recoverable when a data loss event occurs. With archiving, users don’t usually expect to recover information quickly. On top of this, the process of getting what you want is cumbersome and is not something a busy admin will be able to accomplish as quickly as their end users may expect. To achieve reliable SaaS data protection, you need more than archive software, that’s where backup and recovery software comes in. With a third-party SaaS application backup and recovery solution, data is always available for quick and easy restoration to its original state – giving you the ability to essentially turn back time in no time.

The bottom line: Many of the same best practices that admins used in their on-premises environments must be brought along to the cloud, and they can’t assume that Microsoft will correct every single mistake. Ultimately, organizations need to pay more attention to the fine print and understand that they are responsible for keeping their own data safe in the cloud. So, as you move to cloud-based SaaS applications where someone else is managing the physical infrastructure and the applications on which your production data resides, you still need to have a plan in place to ensure that data can be swiftly accessed and recovered in every scenario.

jeff-erramouspeBy Jeff Erramouspe / CEO / Spanning

Prior to being appointed CEO and president, Jeff was Spanning’s Chief Revenue Officer. He was the founding CEO of Deepfile Corporation (became StoredIQ and sold to IBM in 2012), was VP of Market Development at Digby, and served as Vignette Corporation’s first VP of Marketing. He started his career with NCR Corporation and also held senior management positions at Compaq Computer Corporation.

Who’s Who In The Booming World Of Data Science

Who’s Who In The Booming World Of Data Science

The World of Data Science

The nature of work and business in today’s super-connected world means that every second of every day, the world produces an astonishing amount of data. Consider some of these statistics; every minute, Facebook users share nearly 2.5 million pieces of content, YouTube users upload over 72 hours of content, Apple users download nearly 50 000 apps and 200 million emails are sent. That’s every single minute. IBM estimated that we produce over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day and that growth shows no signs of slowing down.

More than ever, we need people and systems to make sense of all that data and it’s no surprise that data science has become one of the hottest spaces in the tech industry. But with the growth has also come confusion about what people really do and who you should be hiring when you need a data scientist.

DataCamp created a very handy infographic recently that breaks the industry down, and we’re going to attempt to simplify it even further for you today.

Data Scientist infographic

Data Scientist

At the top of the pecking order is the Data Scientist, a highly-skilled operator who can currently command a salary around $120 000 per annum. These people are attractive to companies like Google, Microsoft and Adobe due to their ability to clean, massage and organize big data. They are skilled storytellers, able to create predictive models and use maths, stats and machine learning to extract value from the reams of data presented to them.

Data Architects

Working closely with the Data Scientists are the Data Architects. They’re often hired to “create blueprints for data management systems to integrate, centralize, protect and maintain data sources.” They’re skilled in languages like SQL, XML, Hive and Spark and bring their talents to data warehousing, data modeling and systems development. Data Architects command salaries of around $100 000 p/a.

Data Engineers

Supporting the Scientists and Architects are the Data Engineers who develop, construct, test and maintain the architecture which produces the volumes of data needed in multi-national corporations such as Spotify, Facebook and Amazon. They have the mindset of an all-purpose everyman and their skills revolve around Data API’s, data warehousing solutions and modelling. Annual salaries average around $95 000 for the engineers.

Tying this talented trio together in an incredibly value role are the data and analytics managers who are responsible for “managing teams of data analysts and data scientists’’. Generally, they are fluent in languages such as Python, SQL, Java etc but are valued more for their leadership and project management skills and interpersonal communications. Great managers are valued as highly as data scientists and earn roughly the same packages as the scientists.

The Modern Day Statisticians 


Statisticians are generally known as the ‘’historic leaders of data”, and in this day and age, a statistician will collect, analyze and interpret qualitative as well as quantitative data with statistical theories and methods. The mindset required is logical and enthusiastic about data and data mining and are skilled in cloud tools as well. A great statistician will earn in the region of $75 000 annually.

These figures in the world of data science are ably supported by the database administrator, the business analyst and the data analyst who each earn on average $65 000 a year. The analyst is an intuitive data junkie who loves to solve problems and figure things out while the business analyst has learned how to provide a bridge between the IT department and the business units, so that they can best advise how to put this data to work in the interests of whatever company they are working for. Databases can be vulnerable places and the administrator should be on top of backups and security while making sure that the database is available when the relevant stakeholders need to use it. A vital role for someone with nerves of steel and the mindset of disaster prevention.

There are exceptions all the time, but in a nutshell, these are the roles that make up the growing field of data science in the early 21st century as organizations become more and more adept at working their way through fields of data to find key insights and assist improved decision-making in modern day corporations.

By Jeremy Daniel

Connecting To Information With Cyber Physical Systems

Connecting To Information With Cyber Physical Systems

CPS Device Trends On The Rise

It isn’t, “Do you remember who starred in XYZ Movie?” It’s, “Can you look it up please?

Did you ever think you would sit at the dinner table, and when a question came up, someone would look up the answer and share it with everyone?” The words echoed at the table. Actually, I had always dreamed of that. Connection to information is something I have driven for my entire career. The question did, however, get me thinking.

Our devices have three types of information:

Information that is available online that the device can go and get, information that is local to the device and can be accessed quickly, and information that is produced by the device and then shared with the user.

connected devices

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Altogether, that cellular phone is an automation hub, information hub, and Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) device. I found out recently that collecting data from a lot of accelerometers can actually tell you the severity of an earthquake. An aggregation of hi-gain microphones can do the same thing.

That got me thinking about what else your smart phone can do today. So I did an internet search—”add-ons for cellular devices.” I found an incredible number of things you can do with your smartphone to make it into a CPS sensor. All of the devices I found are available today. All include the sensor and the software, usually a free download from the iTunes or Google Play stores.

Cyber Physical Systems Now Shipping

The following is a list of the many devices now shipping that integrate a sensor, software, and information: breathalyzers, laser measurements, 3d scanners, infrared cameras, Geiger counters, UV detectors, weather stations, wind meters (including wind direction), blood pressure cuffs, and any fitness device you could ever want! Want to know how you are driving? A device automatically plugs into the management port of your car and connects to your phone, telling you how you are driving.


My second search was for software that would allow me to use my cellular phone as a CPS device. Again, there are a number of software packages you can download: a seismograph (using your accelerometer), a sonar measuring system (using sound and your microphone), blood monitoring (using the camera), and of course the already pretty standard GPS and camera.


The information your device can produce continues to expand. This brings me, in a circuitous way, to my point. CPS devices are expanding with 10 billion-plus deployed today. As we move further into this market, it is critical that we have a number of new standards. Two of them are critical for the expansion of CPS in the short term. The first is the implementation of an agreed upon management standard for CPS devices. This would include support for the management of one or many CPS devices, including logging, updating, and replacing components of the deployed CPS device from a single enterprise console. The second standard supports the first and is the need for a unified integration framework for CPS devices. Today, many devices produce information only into their unique or custom application. The value for all the devices I’ve listed is in being able to consume that data from any application on your cellphone or laptop.

Standards Of The Future

The reason for the standards has to do with tomorrow. I suspect that many of the sensors you can get for your cellular device today will, in the future, be integrated into devices such as your car and home. That integration will make it easier for your cellular device to connect. But that integration will require the ability to provide management of those devices. They will need software updates, monitoring, and integration of reporting.


Tomorrow’s conversation will not be like the conversation that prompted the question I led off with: “Did you ever think you would sit at the dinner table and, when a question came up, someone would look up the answer and share it with everyone?” said in response to two people quickly grabbing their cell phones and providing the answer to the question of who was in XYZ Movie. The question of tomorrow may be something like “How did you get a sunburn? Didn’t the house tell you the UV reading was high today?” The answer would then be something like “It did. I fell asleep outside reading a book.”

By Scott Andersen

Driving Insight: Analytics And The Internet of Things

Driving Insight: Analytics And The Internet of Things

Analytics And The Internet of Things 

For many businesses, the Internet of Things is playing an increasingly important role, influencing day-to-day operations and strategic planning. An ecosystem of growing complexity and sophistication, the IoT calls for careful navigation: advances in connectivity and cloud-based platforms have opened up a wider range of solutions to IT decision-makers in search of number crunching solutions that can deliver insight and drive their organization forward. When talking about this process, commentators tend to sketch the different stages of the Information Value Loop, the way in which information can be harvested and analyzed to yield insights that inform future behaviour. As a theory, the Information Value Loop is unquestionably attractive. But how do we put it into practice? In this article I wanted to address this question from the perspective of someone looking for ways to develop smarter ergonomic solutions.


Research by companies like ARM has done a lot to improve IoT chip design, making smart connected devices more efficient and reducing development risk. It’s possible for manufacturers to collect data from sensors built in to their products, and to combine this information with other data and analyse it in real time. In the kitchen, for example, LG’s HomeChat hub leverages the IoT for consumers by enabling them to control appliances remotely with an app, whether to start the washing cycle so clothes are ready when they get back from work or turn on the ThinkQ oven.

This connectivity can benefit consumers; but how can we use it to derive new insight and identify potential issues or opportunities?

Data and the Cloud

Given the sheer volume of data, the cloud is key to this process. Once generated, the information is transmitted to cloud data centers, where it can be aggregated with similar data sourced from around the world.


(Image Source: Marc Smith)

This is where the process starts to become more complicated: if crossing international borders, companies will be faced with different privacy laws and compliance requirements. The numbers also need to be crunched, and the growing availability of R packages, data analytics tools which can visualized with an API like Google Charts, is making it easier for organizations to address problems specific to their industry and to handle bigger and bigger data sets.


Analytic tools can be made to do different things. At one level, for example, they simply provide a more digestible overview of the data, by rendering it in a more comprehensible form. This kind of descriptive analytics works by showing patterns and wrangling information that may otherwise have been overlooked. More powerful tools go further than this.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

A famous example is the way banks use predictive learning to crack down on fraud. Here the more transaction data the system processes, the better it becomes at identifying instances of possible fraud. But in other models, analytics can be harnessed to provide firm recommendations based on prescriptive algorithms. This is where IoT devices can be aligned with behavioral science and Nudge theory, with devices able to advise users on the best course of action in a given scenario. For example, an IoT ergonomic workstation might tell an employee to adjust their posture or screen brightness, or just to take a break.


From cars to slow cookers, then, the IoT is rapidly becoming a feature of domestic and professional life. The challenge for industry is two-fold: on the one hand, we have to develop the tools that can extract as much value and insight as possible from data sets; and on the other, we have to find ways of unearthing realizable insights that can deliver value for customers and stakeholders. Pulling off this double goal is no mean feat. But the benefits for ergonomics and workplace health alone make it a worthwhile objective and, potentially, a game-changer.

By George Foot

Cloud Computing – The Game Changer

Cloud Computing – The Game Changer

Global Cloud Index

In October, Cisco released its Global Cloud Index (GCI) report for 2014-2019, projecting a near 3-fold growth of global data center traffic, with predictions that this traffic will reach 8.6 zettabytes (cloud data center traffic) and 10.4 zettabytes (total data center traffic) per year in 2019 and 80% of it will come from the Cloud. It’s predicted that the Middle East and Africa will show the highest Cloud traffic growth at 41% CAGR, followed closely by Eastern Europe (38% CAGR), and North America (33% CAGR). Cloud computing has already revolutionized the way we live and do business, but it’s evident the evolution has just begun.


Cloud Drivers

Cisco predicts that the development of IoT will notably increase cloud traffic growth as a broad range of IoT applications generate data that may reach 507.5 zettabytes per year in 2019. Today, the majority of IoT data is stored on individual devices, but that could change with the evolution of big data analytics and application demand.

Cisco’s GCI also projects that Software as a Service (SaaS) will be the most adopted and popular service model for cloud workloads by 2019, increasing 14% between 2014 and 2019, but Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) workloads and Platform as a Service (PaaS) workloads of the total cloud workloads will drop.

Cloud Mobility Changing our Lives



Cloud is encouraging the uptake of gaming with its broad reach as well as the power to provide high speed and optimum hardware requirements to anyone. And with new applications developing for almost every industry, including healthcare, insurance, and education, the Cloud is literally gamifying our lives.

Information Overload

While the Cloud is likely to make maintenance and repair easier as Cloud-based apps alert users of failures and connect to the net for self-repair procedures, we are also likely to find ourselves inundated with notifications, reports, advice, and warnings. Add to this, marketers will be taking every opportunity to tailor shopping experiences and develop relationships, so advice and suggestions aren’t likely to be in short supply.

Making You Smarter

Of course, as the Cloud turns mobile devices into supercomputers, we’ll have access to more information to make smarter decisions, having the power to analyze almost any information wherever we are. Moreover, the possibilities for IoT devices that make us more intelligent are endless.

Remove Business Constraints

As small- and medium-sized businesses leverage the Cloud, geographical and budget constraints will fade with the benefits of scalability. Businesses won’t need to deploy on-site infrastructure to run operations and will, in days, be able to go global and keep up with much larger companies.

Healthier Homes

With the flourishing home health monitoring market, public and private Cloud will make our homes healthier. As the Cloud provides doctors with wireless patient monitoring, valuable data can be analyzed for the creation of better treatment plans.

The Babel Fish

Cloud computing is already providing mobile-device users with accurate speech recognition that may fade language barriers almost as well as Douglas Adams’ Babel Fish. We might not have long to wait for a software able to recognize and then translate audio over a mobile device, providing users with real-time translation services for all their calls.

Not matter the industry or region, Cloud is changing our lives in dramatic and exciting ways. Do you have any ideas or hopes for the next big Cloud innovation? Let us know in the comments below.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Oracle Is Extremely Bullish On The Cloud

Oracle Is Extremely Bullish On The Cloud

Bullish On The Cloud

Global software giant Oracle laid out, in no uncertain terms, its ambition to be the dominant player in the cloud over the next ten years at its annual Oracle OpenWorld gathering late last month. CEO Mark Hurd and Oracle Founder Larry Ellison both laid out a powerful vision of the cloud and the way they see business moving in the next 10 years.

During his keynote address CEO Mark Hurd predicted that:

By 2025, over 80% of all applications will be in the cloud Click to Tweet
as opposed to the modest 25% that are there today. Furthermore, he boldly stated that only two Software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers will have 80% of that market, and that “I volunteer us to be one of them”, to appreciative laughter from the packed auditorium.

The commitment to cloud computing and the direction of the company became apparent when Oracle founder Larry Ellison opened the gathering by saying “The transition to the cloud is a generational change – this is a big deal. This is as big of a deal as when personal computers showed up.

Rapid Innovation

The transition to the cloud is being driven by the economic realities of the moment and an unworkable reliance on infrastructure that was built “pre-search, pre-mobile, pre everything we know.” Hurd went to great lengths explaining that the new cloud is “about a less complex environment; it’s about a more secure environment with rapid innovation that’s easy. That’s what’s driving this and nothing else – it’s macro and micro economics, an ability to get from here to there at a lower cost and get to faster innovation now.”

The weeklong gathering devoted countless hours to Oracle’s ambitions to lead in the cloud and to manage the transitional period. Ellison spoke of “A long period of transition and co-existence as more and more workloads move off premise and into the cloud.” Topics such as Oracle’s Cloud Strategy, accelerating digital transformation, the Supply Chain Management Cloud and more dominated proceedings and firmly set out the direction of the company. To further support Oracle’s focus on cloud based connected technologies, they’ve recently introduced a series of new innovations within the Oracle Marketing Cloud. In a press release this morning.

kevin-akeroydAs we look ahead to 2016, marketing’s ability to modernize existing processes and embrace data, technology and content will increasingly define the success of organizations across all industries,” said Kevin Akeroyd, SVP and GM, Oracle Marketing Cloud. “For many marketers, this will require a significant transformation and that is why we are so focused on making marketing technology more integrated, more holistic and, frankly, easier to use. With the latest enhancements to the Oracle Marketing Cloud, we continue to deliver on that vision with an exciting set of new innovations that improve sales enablement, allow better cross-channel orchestration and help marketers directly attribute revenue to marketing activities…

Continued Support

Other cloud supporters taking part in last month’s event, such as GE and AIG were firmly on the same page. Jim Fowler, CIO of GE told the gathering that “GE is undergoing its most important and largest transformation in its 130-year history. It’s the cloud that enables it.” Mike Brady, the Chief Technology Officer of AIG explained how his organization is adopting a “two-speed” cloud-based model that allows it to host its legacy applications either internally or in the cloud, and to move to “very, very fast development capabilities.

The biggest challenge that both providers and consumers are facing is around security. Larry Ellison devoted most of his address to the issues of security and improvements in Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) “While we’re doing pretty well in terms of improving our reliability in the cloud and lowering cost in the cloud,” he explained, “the biggest concern we have as an industry, and the consumers of our technology, their biggest concern is security.”

Hurd was extremely bullish about Oracle’s security capabilities, balancing out Ellison by confidently claiming that “We are fully patched, fully secured, fully encrypted – that’s our cloud,” he said.

By Jeremy Daniel

Cognitive Systems And The Disappearance Of Dark Data

Cognitive Systems And The Disappearance Of Dark Data

The Realities of Big Data

By now you will, at the very least, have heard about Big Data, and if your organization isn’t doing its best to reap the rewards of data collection, processing, and application, you’ll realize a prime resource is being left untapped. Big Data Basics explores how Big Data is changing businesses today, noting that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the in the last two years thanks in part to the increase in mobile devices, social media networks, and digital video and photo sharing. In the past, the inexperienced data user might find Big Data a distraction, but fortunately with the growth of data sources and volumes we’ve also experienced significant advances in technology able to process and utilize this data.


The Realities of Big Data

  • Data volumes are growing exponentially, and it’s expected that by 2020 every human will be creating 1.7 megabytes of new information per second.
  • Over 1 billion people used Facebook in August this year, and approximately 31.25 million Facebook messages are sent every minute.
  • YouTube experiences video uploads of 300 video hours per minute, and it would take about 15 years to watch one day of uploads.
  • Google processes more than 40,000 search queries a second. A total of 3.5 billion plus search queries every day.
  • Every minute of every day 570 new websites are launched.
  • By 2020, the world will have more than 50 billion smart connected devices, and at least a third of all data will pass through the cloud.
  • Healthcare could save up to $300 billion a year by properly integrating big data.
  • In the U.S. alone, 6 million new jobs will be generated through the needs of Big Data.
  • Currently, less than 0.5% of data is analyzed and used.

The Tech of Big Data

  • Cognitive systems are developing so rapidly that “dark data” could soon be a thing of the past.
  • Predictive maintenance is replacing break-fix methods thanks to IoT devices and sensors capable of analyzing data and reacting appropriately.
  • By 2020, the Hadoop market is expected to surpass $1 billion, growing annually at a compounded 58%.
  • The entire Big Data technology and services market will hit $48.6 billion in 2019.
  • Security standards and policies for Big Data are more essential than ever with cyber attacks reaching an all-time high.
  • Artificial Intelligence will create more personal data through subjective interactions.

For more Big Data insight, download LaunchAny’s free eBook.

By Jennifer Klostermann

CloudTweaks Comics
The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

The DDoS Attack That Shook The World

The DDoS Attack That Shook The World

DDoS Attack: Update 2 6 days after the DDoS attack that rocked the internet to its core, Dyn have released detailed analysis of the attack and further details have emerged. The attack has been confirmed to have been the largest of its kind in history, and the Mirai botnet has been cited as the official cause.…

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…


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