Category Archives: Cloud Computing

How Data Governance Can Block Dirty Data

How Data Governance Can Block Dirty Data

Data Governance Can Block Dirty Data

Just in time for the NCAA final tournament tonight, here’s an infographic by Integrate that illustrates the benefits of automating third-party demand gen efforts.

The infographic breaks down the Xs and Os of third-party demand generation, contrasting the results of outdated, manual tactics against the effectiveness of new demand gen strategies automated by technology.

Offensive plays illustrate how automation creates greater agility and effectiveness to overall marketing efforts while defensive plays outline the ways data governance software blocks dirty data from penetrating systems and compromising demand gen results.

Key points from the infographic highlight how automating third-party demand gen can:

  • Recover 40-60 hours per month
  • Increase lead velocity 900%
  • Decrease the effective cost per lead (CPL) by 18%
  • Reduce the cost per opportunity by 56%

Cloud Infographic – ATARI – 40 Years of Fun

Cloud Infographic – ATARI – 40 Years of Fun

ATARI – 40 Years of Fun

Cloud gaming has been a topic on CloudTweaks for a number of years. However, to close out the holiday weekend, we’ve decided to rewind back a few decades to (ATARI, Intellivsion and ColecoVision) and take a closer look at one of the most popular gaming companies ever to hit the market – ATARI.

For anyone looking for a little nostalgic Atari online game play (Missile Command, Pong, Combat) can do so here.

Here is an infographic which takes a look at the 40 years of ATARI.


The Cloud Service Broker Market Grows

The Cloud Service Broker Market Grows

CSBs help you manage your mix of public and private clouds, but their capabilities vary widely

Don’t look now, but the U.S. cloud service broker (CSB) market will grow from $225.4 million in 2013 to $2 billion by 2018, growing 55.3 percent per year. The global CSB market will grow from $1.6 billion in 2013 to $10.5 billion by 2018, growing 46.2 percent per year, according to MarketsandMarkets.

Read The Article At Infoworld

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Small Business Cloud Computing

Trepidation is inherently attached to anything that involves change and especially if it involves new technologies. SMBs are incredibly vulnerable to this fear and rightfully so. The wrong security breach can incapacitate a small startup for good whereas larger enterprises can reboot their operations due to the financial stability of shareholders.

Gordon Tan contributed an article called Five Reasons Why SMBs Fear The Cloud and here are some of the major reasons that prevent SMBs from moving forward.

  1. I don’t know what Cloud Computing is
  2. It’s not cost effective
  3. My data will not be secure
  4. My system will run slower
  5. The Cloud Service Provider might fail

The Positive

On the flip side to all the fear, there is evidence that SMB cloud adoption is continuing to increase.  Despite any uncertainties, the opportunity to save money gives way to any shadowy doubts of the potential security risks.  Below is an infographic provide by the NJ Institute Of Technology which provides a quick cloud refresher for small businesses.


IBM Partners With China Telecom

IBM Partners With China Telecom

BEIJING (Reuters) – International Business Machines (IBM) (IBM.N: Quote) has struck a deal with China Telecom Corp Ltd (0728.HK: Quote) to offer and manage corporate-grade mobile apps, the latest in a string of tie-ups with Chinese firms.

Under the agreement, state-owned China Telecom will host on its servers IBM’s MobileFirst service, which helps corporations manage apps for Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O: Quote) iPhone and iPad devices.

Read The Full Release At Reuters

Software Defined Networks Could Revolutionize Submarine Network Cable Architecture

Software Defined Networks Could Revolutionize Submarine Network Cable Architecture

Software Defined Networks

Software Defined Network (SDN) architecture is gaining greater market acceptance as one of the best ways to extend capabilities across networks to meet worldwide demand for more network capacity. SDNs make the network programmable by separating the network from the physical control, thereby reducing delivery costs and enabling flexible routing and provisioning, faster content delivery and automation, application deployment and cloud enablement.

More and more, SDNs are being incorporated to extend network functionality beyond the physical layer. In a 2014 Infonetics Research survey of 153 medium and large companies, 87 percent said they were planning to go live with SDNs in the data center environment by 2016 in order to improve management capabilities. International Data Corporation (IDC) confirms the growing interest in SDN, predicting global utilization of SDN will reach $8 billion by 2018.

Network as a Service (NaaS)

True flexibility is gained when SDN functionality is combined with self-provisioning on an open source architected platform to enable a Network as a Service (NaaS) environment of interconnected clouds in a cohesive data center-to-data center solution. This allows customers to shape their traffic needs between locations using submarine and network capacity dynamically to the edge.

The next progression in SDN architecture is to place the same capability directly in the core network.  This way, submarine cables can become part of the solution to the cloud. By creating a flexible pricing schedule and usage-based solutions on a self-service platform, providers create additional value and opportunities that do not necessarily cannibalize existing revenue models, which is a concern to many operators. Instead, by enabling self-provisioning at the network layer, the network truly becomes a service offering. It’s this service orientation, using the core network itself to move up the stack and integrate layers through self-service and intelligent orchestration, which creates new and interesting ways to increase the flexibility of cable assets while benefitting customers.

Mobile Data


It’s inevitable that ever increasing bandwidth demand in the age of the digital world economy will drive change in the way network architecture is designed and configured. This creates a best-case solution for improved asset use through SDN deployment, particularly when considering the following:

  • The mobile data traffic sector grew by 497 million mobile devices and connections last year.
  • Mobile data capacity reached 2.5 exabytes worldwide for the month of December.
  • By 2018, Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) will be carrying more than half of all Internet traffic.
  • Worldwide mobile payments are expected to grow to 47 billion transactions through 2015.
  • Gartner predicts 25 billion connected devices will be part of the Internet of Things (IoT) by 2020.

Greater capacity is needed for the APAC region and beyond. In China alone, international bandwidth grew from 1.9 Tbps to 3.4 Tbps in 2013, representing an 80 percent increase in demand. At the same time, India’s international bandwidth demand grew from 695 Gbps to 1.2 Tbps, representing a 75 percent increase during the same period. Other growing markets for increased Internet demand, such as South America and the African intercontinental route, indicate there are more opportunities ahead.

Legacy networks were not designed to handle the content delivery demand that network providers find themselves grappling with today. SDN architecture can provide new growth opportunities for providers interested in taking control of assets by dynamically configuring networks to alleviate bandwidth and capacity issues.

Global Data Delivery


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Today, 97 percent of global data traffic is carried between continents and countries over submarine fiber cables, which as of December 2013 provided total transoceanic bandwidth capacity of 87 Tbps.

Submarine fiber capacity is upgradeable beyond its original design, and there are enough cables in the APAC region and elsewhere to handle ongoing capacity needs. In fact, it’s much more common today for telecom providers to deploy 100G networks and upgrades over submarine cables to supply additional bandwidth. This allows carriers to handle growing backhaul and capacity needs at a lower cost.  In addition, network owners and equipment vendors are partnering together more often, adding new routes to ensure elasticity for cloud computing needs, as well as redundancy, resiliency and additional capacity.

By extending SDN functionality to encompass the data center and submarine cable architecture, providers can virtualize the inter- and the intra-data center, and cloud and data center networks, which allows network owners to play over the top and gain more revenue from existing assets. Likewise, network providers who have control over data center assets can dynamically provision SDN and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) with fewer constraints than operators with fixed cables or a consortium of network providers can achieve. Because SDN is available over open source, vendors can partner with service providers to develop new ways to integrate and improve technology to build a customer engaging solution.

A unified approach to network and service management enables better provisioning of service while accommodating on-demand transport bandwidth through a single interface for a seamless customer experience. Together with the advance of 100G transmission rates, capacity can be extended cost-effectively to handle the demand, offering providers operational efficiency gains and faster service delivery speeds.

Software Defined Network architecture is gaining greater market share because it provides a flexible and agile platform to extend network capabilities beyond the physical layer. SDNs offer a cost-effective way for carriers to gain the maximum value from installed submarine cable assets, while putting the bounce back into cables with a new service-oriented approach that unties the underlying value of network assets.

By Andy Lumsden, Chief Technology Officer, Pacnet

Andy_Lumsden_1_560Based in Hong Kong, Andy Lumsden leads efforts to maintain Pacnet’s technology leadership with next generation network platforms and infrastructure for managed services.  He previously served as Pacnet’s Vice President of Engineering and was responsible for developing Pacnet’s submarine cable network architecture. 

Cloud Infographic: Backing Up And Storing Your Data Is No Joke

Cloud Infographic: Backing Up And Storing Your Data Is No Joke

Backing Up And Storing Your Data Is No Joke

When was the last time you backed up any of your precious documents on your hard drive? March 31st was the annual “World Backup Day” which helps create awareness of the importance of backing up your files.  Tech professionals and consumers alike can benefit from backing up. Some choose to back up sensitive data and family photos, while others may opt to backup entire systems.

According to an infographic courtesy of

  • 113 smartphones are stolen every minute of everyday
  • Lost devices cost consumers 30 billion dollars every year
  • 29% of all electronic losses happen by accident
  • 1-in-10 PCs are currently infected with a virus
  • Over 30% of people never backup

These are some eye-opening stats! It’s rather stunning knowing how much valuable data can be lost by failing to do something as simple as backing up. The infographic also states that hardware or systems malfunctions and human error are the most preventable yet leading causes of global data loss.

Additional revelations include:

  • 39% of data disasters are accidents
  • Hacking accounts for a whopping 67% of business data loss
  • Global revenue of cloud backup services increased by +225% in 2014
  • Dropbox cloud backup services increased its user base by +1100% in 2014

As you can see, making reliable backups for your files is more serious than most people think, tech professionals included. While backing up entire hard drives might seem like a daunting task, peace of mind can be as simple as a few clicks and USB flash drives away. Every day is world backup day, so the time to backup is always right now.



Do you have a story of losing valuable data because you didn’t backup? Leave your story in the comment section below!

The Many Hats Of Today’s IT Managers

The Many Hats Of Today’s IT Managers

The Many Hats of IT Managers

In years past, the IT department of most large organizations was much like a version of Middle Earth: a mysterious nether world where people who seemed infinitely smarter than the rest of us bustled around, speaking and typing languages that appeared indecipherable, yet, which made our world work. They knew things. They were always incredibly busy, and you felt a surge of privilege when it finally became your time to have an audience with one of them.

IT Wizard 


I remember the first time an IT wizard came at me with his claws. I was a student, running spreadsheet formulas in Lotus 1-2-3 (yes, I am that old) for the Forex trading floor of a major bank. Looking up from my black and green screen, I saw the head IT guy coming at me with a set of hand operated claws, like a prop from Edward Scissorhands. He plunged the points of the claws into the carpet next to my chair. It was then that I discovered I had been working upon a false floor. The claws lifted a square carpet segment up and out of the way, to reveal a maze of cables, pipes and blinking lights. Middle Earth. He dove halfway down into the space, wrestled with something unseen, and emerged upright once again. He then retreated into his climate-controlled server room, protected by magnetic door locks and the ever-present threat of a purging blast of Halon gas.

Driving Transformation

The modern age has changed much of this. The IT department is becoming a different entity – one in which secrecy gives way to openness, in-house gives way to cloud, and perhaps most significant of all, its status as a cost centre has changed to become a business. As such, IT Managers and IT executives face a serious modification to their business model. They must now wear many hats.


First, the adoption of cloud technology, especially hybrid cloud, means that much of the work that IT managers used to do directly is now handled by outside experts. Security, maintenance, upgrades – these are now the domain of the managed services provider. The IT manager becomes the buyer, the client. Such a shift requires greater business skills than ever before, to identify and scrutinize key providers and delegate work accordingly. The wizard’s hat is being replaced by the entrepreneur’s hat.

The IT manager must keep this entrepreneur’s hat on while investigating consumer trends. In both the B2B and B2C worlds, customers are demanding a more personalized, engaging experience, in which big data and predictive analytics further the sales relationship at an unprecedented level of quality. Responsive websites, adaptive mobile and smartphone sites require a mindset that is both strategic and technically adept, if the competition is to be held at bay.

The IT manager must also have an executive’s hat nearby, because a seat at the boardroom table is now a necessity. No company dare make strategic decisions anymore without input from IT. The IT department is no longer there to “make it so” once a decision has been made, the IT department must be part of that decision.

IT must also wear an HR manager’s hat, since strategies BYOD and CYOD will have profound impact on attracting and retaining key talent as well as ensuring productivity from the workforce.

Time Management Skills

Time management has always been an essential skill for IT managers, but now a great deal of this must be more proactive than ever: keeping up with trends and technologies, instead of retaining the tradition of reactive time management that came along with help desk calls, firefighting and service tickets.

IT must also offer a greater awareness of human factors engineering in assessing how technologies will be used by mere mortals once deployed. There has long been a disconnect between those who held the secret knowledge of which key was the “any key” in software instructions and why certain dialog boxes tell users to click “OK” to cancel a command, or “Cancel” to continue. In earlier years, people simply proceeded as best they could, or took time out of their day to take a course. Now, however, each and every one of them is at liberty, unofficially, to go online and find something better that suits them, whether it fits with the corporate mantra or not. This too, spills over into the BYOD and cloud debates.

IT Managers must display great amounts of political savvy when dealing with CEOs and large ERP-based organizations; for although technology continues to surge ahead, there is a great deal of legacy and traditionalism to wade through.

Finally, an IT manager must feel a relentless hunger for the best. The world of business continues to roll along with dizzying swiftness, and an acceptance of this pace of change is the lynchpin to ensuring a company stays on top of the game in satisfying its clients, both internal and external. It’s still black magic, but it is now a great deal more diverse.

This post is brought to you by The CIO Agenda.

KPMG LLP is a Delaware limited liability partnership and is the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of KPMG LLP.

By Steve Prentice

CloudTweaks Comics
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The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

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The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

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Key Takeaways From Dyn’s DDoS Attack

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The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

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Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

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Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

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Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

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Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

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