Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Cloud Infographic – Where Sensitive Data Resides

Cloud Infographic – Where Sensitive Data Resides

Where Sensitive Data Resides

Data security remains a top concern for enterprises deploying popular cloud applications. While most will instinctively think of cloud data security and compliance as being handled only by IT departments, many enterprises are realizing that all aspects of security – from selecting a cloud service provider (CSP) to monitoring cloud use over time – requires involvement across the organization. Gerry Grealish has some additional advice and other compliance factors to consider.

Included is an infographic provided courtesy of Perspecsys which provides some insight into many of the challenges of data security visibility. Be sure to take a look at one of their other security related infographics on the history of security.

Perspecsys_Final

5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Lost

5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Lost

5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud

The growth of cloud based business support systems has been staggering, and while some major software houses have quickly positioned themselves as forerunners in the move to the Cloud, there are several high-flying companies that have so far failed to provide small businesses with the level of support that many have grown to expect.

A couple of days ago I had covered “5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Won” and today I’m covering (subjectively) “5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Lost”. Keep in mind that each of these companies have done incredibly well but I feel there is room for improvement in this department.

Here we take a look at several software companies that have failed to develop a cloud service that meets the growing needs of entrepreneurs and SMEs.

Blackberry

Blackberry (RIM) dominated business mobile telephone services for many years; it’s only in the past few years that businesses started moving towards Google Android and Apple iPhone. In 2010, Blackberry had a massive 42% of the market share in the US and roughly 20% worldwide (Q1 2010), in supplying businesses and government organisations with smartphones. That number has dwindled to less than 1%.

Statistic: Global smartphone OS market share held by RIM (BlackBerry) from 2007 to 2014, by quarter | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista

Blackberry was the first to provide businesses with mobile email and business SMS services. However, improvements in mobile internet and more powerful handsets means that this is no longer a unique selling point and businesses are now demanding more from their devices. Smartphones that use Apple and Google platforms are able to link to cloud based business software, such as CRM, email, spreadsheets and ERP. Business owners are more demanding today and Blackberry failed to provide sufficient solutions.

Oracle

Oracle is the world’s second largest software manufacturer after Microsoft, providing enterprise application software for major businesses. Before the internet, they had a great strategy, namely to provide the best solutions for major corporations, develop a strong brand, and gain respect in the industry.

Oracle appears to have missed an opportunity to use its expertise and resources to develop solutions that are suited to the smaller business. The biggest hurdle for cloud software providers is in developing and maintaining powerful and secure servers to handle data.

As Oracle has the infrastructure in place already, it should be able to offer software-as-a-service (SAAS) services to smaller businesses. So far, there appears to be very little development in this area. Oracle has developed a business intelligence solution, but the premium price tag means that its services are not suitable for small business.

Yahoo!

Yahoo! was once bigger than Google in terms of service offerings but a failure to develop apps and cloud storage has seen Yahoo! lose ground to Google and Microsoft Outlook. Yahoo! has bought the photo storage and sharing site Flickr, as well as partnering with cloud storage company Dropbox, but both of these products are losing out to Google Drive. Yahoo! is still the world’s second most popular webmail service, but it is losing the small business market to Google.

EMC

EMC provides companies with data storage, information security, virtualization and analytics solutions, as well as cloud computing services. EMC targets businesses of all sizes, but few very small businesses understand what they offer.

EMC is the largest provider of data storage in the world and its cloud based storage solutions have won many awards. It provides excellent storage and back-up solutions that can literally save businesses in the event of a disaster.

If EMC built a competitive solution that serves small businesses, it could rapidly reach a much wider audience. The company’s expertise in cloud computing, virtual machines and data storage places it in a strong position to dominate the data recovery market.

Dropbox

File Sharing

Dropbox is a popular file sharing service that many businesses utilise in order to collaborate on spreadsheets and documents. It also provides a secure way to access business files from roaming computers.

There’s no denying it offers an excellent low-budget cloud storage service for SMEs, but Dropbox has failed to provide the same level of cloud support as some of its competitors. One of the biggest issues users have with the product occurs when more than one person opens and edits a file at the same time. Dropbox will create a “conflicted copy”, but this can lead to confusion and work is sometimes lost when one user overwrites the live changes made by another. Services such as Google Drive display changes in real time and this makes conflicts impossible.

The concept of the cloud is not new but it is only in the past few years that internet infrastructure has developed sufficiently to make cloud computing a viable option. Many software companies are still struggling to implement cloud strategies, and their rush to enter the cloud market is at times resulting in an inferior service. Time will tell whether or not these companies will successfully enter the small business Cloud – in such a competitive field, it seems it’s harder than ever to develop the perfect cloud solution at the perfect price for today’s fledgling companies.

By Gary Gould

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Checklist For Startups 

There are many people who aspire to do great things in this world and see new technologies such as Cloud computing and Internet of Things as a tremendous offering to help bridge and showcase their ideas.

The Time Is Now

startup-checklist

This is a perfect time for highly ambitious startups to make some noise. CMS (Contact Management Systems) such as WordPress, Joomla, Drupal are either free or inexpensive.

Being a small startup you’re probably looking to bootstrap and scale as you go along. If you can’t afford to hire your own team to monitor website and application security, you may consider any number of the Managed WordPress Hosting services on the market. This is a growing area and we expect to see a high number of acquisitions in the future as the need for low cost managed wordpress hosting continues to rise. Next, you’ll need to attract eyeballs to your startup so you’ll need to start building some content and you can either do this yourself or use any number of the many blogging services on the market to help get you started.

Pitching To Win

Once you have an innovative product/service and a functioning desktop/mobile website, you’ll be ready to start pitching your ideas to investors. Entrepreneur magazine has put together a tremendous list of early stage VC investors that you can review to determine which ones may be the best fit.

vc100

Another excellent option is to register and list your company with angel.co in order to attract some serious investor interest.

In Closing

For those still unsure about about the attraction of the cloud. Here are some benefits of moving your startup business to the cloud:

1. Low costs. When setting up your business for cloud computing, all the expenses that you would have incurred if the system was setup in-house are non-existent. There will be no hardware purchases for servers and no over spending on the man-hours that it would take to setup everything.

2. Scalability. Because of its nature, cloud services scale dramatically from very small needs of home businesses to huge corporate demands. Because of its pay to use model, clients will only need to pay for what they need and scale up if ever their needs grow.

3. Collaboration. Since SaaS applications can be accessed from anywhere and at anytime, it is easier to collaborate with employees who are not in the same geographical location and makes it easier to manage a global workforce.

In the eyes of this proponent of all things technology, the benefits that cloud computing brings to a business, far outweighs the downsides and concerns.

By Brent Anderson

Cloud Infographic – Big Business Is Still Learning

Cloud Infographic – Big Business Is Still Learning

Big Business Is Still Learning

Although the Cloud has been around for some time now, there continues to be many myths about how it works and what advantages it holds. Many businesses remain hesitant to implement fully-hosted solutions within their organization, specifically for functions like unified communications (UCaaS), despite the fact that the clear majority of IT professionals said they recognize the cloud’s benefits and believed quality of service would not suffer due to the transition.  It seems that many companies and IT managers still have concerns about the cloud’s costs and security.

Over 300 IT managers were surveyed and while the clear majority realized the benefits of the cloud and believed quality of service would not suffer due to the transition, many remain hesitant to implement fully-hosted solutions, especially in regards to UCaaS.

  • More than half of IT Managers said they don’t believe communication services providers offer sufficient security checks alongside their cloud telecommunications offerings
  • 54% expect to recoup the entire cost of shifting to the cloud while 46% disagreed, saying the ROI is not there just yet
  • Just 40% said their organization has plans to move voice/telephony communications to the cloud

Infographic and survey provided courtesy of the group at West IP.

WestIP-Cloud-Infographic-FINAL

Trillions at Stake in Commercial Development of Driverless Cars

Trillions at Stake in Commercial Development of Driverless Cars

Commercial Development of Driverless Cars

An international race is on to develop driverless cars that will free our cities from congestion, and there are trillions of dollars at stake.

With Google currently seen to be leading the race to develop driverless cars commercially, eight or more car manufacturers have made it clear that they are also in it to win it, or at least share in the enormous potential profits. These include Audi, Daimler, Delphi, Ford, General Motors, Nissan, BMW, Tesla, and Volvo.

BMW-Future-cars

(Image Source: All-electric BMW i3 – Yauhen_D / Shutterstock)

A recent Forbes news report that names interested vehicle manufacturers also points out that “trillions are at stake.” With new vehicle sales in the US accounting for a mere 19 percent of global auto sales, the potential is astounding – especially since income relating to the annual US automotive industry tops more than $2.5 trillion. National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) figures show that new vehicles accounted for $464.3 billion in 2014 alone.

The same report also claims that driverless taxis would disrupt the US car rental trade by some $26 billion. This could impact dramatically on public transportation as a whole, even as frontrunners developing driverless cars will be sure to make money, and lots of it.

At the same time, it will also depend whether “driverless” cars are completely unmanned or not. While Google is aiming for totally autonomous, driverless cars, Tesla, for example, has said it will focus on autopilot and release drivers from “tedious tasks” rather than get rid of the driver completely.

Another issue is safety.

Self-Driving Cars and Accidents

Google announced this week that the self-driving cars it has been testing in California – on the open road, including highways – have been involved in a total of 11 accidents during the past six years. The company maintains that all accidents were “minor” and that the cars weren’t the cause of any of the accidents. The claim is that other drivers crashed into driverless cars (so not my fault).

According to Google’s director of the self-driving program, Chris Urmson, rear-end crashes account for the most accidents in the US, “and often there’s little the driver in front can do to avoid getting hit.

This might sound minimal, but in real terms, these accidents involved four of the 48 self-driving cars on Californian roads (8.3 percent), and they all happened in the past eight months since it became mandatory to report all accidents being tested on public roads. One car belonged to Delphi (that supplies parts), and the others to Google.

Whatever the impact (physical or financial) companies that don’t want to get rid of drivers totally have some confidence that drivers can prevent accidents. This becomes a real issue when conditions aren’t perfect, says Pat Bassett, vice president of the North American research and engineering center for Denso. For this reason there are, he says “still some technical challenges and some legal issues that have to be resolved.”

After all, if nobody is driving, who will be held responsible?

Nevertheless when and if self-driving cars become a daily reality, there is no doubt that traffic patterns will change.

How Shared Self-Driving Cars Could Change City Traffic

A new study by the International Transport Forum (ITF) indicates how driverless cars are likely to change traffic congestion in the world’s cities. “Impact on travel volume Shared and self-driving fleets hold much promise for reducing the number of cars in our cities…

car-sharing

(Image Source: International Transport Forum)

Ultimately, self-driving cars could remove nine out of ten cars from city streets and make them redundant. This scenario would free up vast amounts of public space that would not need to be used for parking. The question is probably not how many driverless cars will ultimately take to the streets of USA, but which companies will make money from them.

By Penny Swift

Four Reasons Why CIOs Must Transform IT Into ITaaS To Survive

Four Reasons Why CIOs Must Transform IT Into ITaaS To Survive

CIOs Must Transform IT

The emergence of the Cloud and its three delivery models of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) has dramatically impacted and forever changed the delivery of IT services. Cloud services have pierced the veil of IT by challenging traditional method’s dominance and forcing internal IT departments to compete with alternative Cloud-based solutions. Business Unit Managers (BUM) and Lines of Business (LOB) have fueled the Shadow IT movement by directly purchasing IT solutions from Cloud providers without the approval, or even involvement, of their IT department—and this is only the beginning.

Shadow IT

Moving forward, new Cloud services will continue to evolve and further compete with internal IT departments for business. If your department isn’t ready for this change, be prepared to watch the migration of IT services to the cloud diminish the role of your IT operations.

What is ITaaS?

In order for traditional IT to continue, remain viable and thrive in the organization it must transform into IT as a Service (ITaaS). What is ITaaS? Wikipedia defines it as “a competitive business model where an enterprise IT organization views the LOBs as having many options for IT services and the IT organization has to compete against those other options in order to be the provider to the needs of the LOBs. Options for providers other than the internal IT organization may include outsourcing companies and public cloud providers.

Why ITaaS? Let’s review this in the next section.

Benefits of ITaaS

In short, ITaaS can transform IT from a cost-center to a strategic part of the enterprise.

Adopting an ITaaS mentality will enable IT to adopt a business-centric approach with a focus on collaborating with the business units to understand their needs and requirements in order to become a strategic partner rather than a combative force to be avoided. This new relationship will enable IT to better understand and thereby deliver solutions that meet the needs of the LOBs.

Standardization And Simplification

Developing an ITaaS model also forces IT through the exercise of productizing its offering. In order to achieve this, IT needs to simplify and standardize, creating predictable, repeatable results thereby increasing their success rate while delivering a consistent user experience. Another result of standardization and simplification is increased operational efficiency leading to a lower cost needed to compete with the services delivered from external cloud providers.

By creating a more transparent pricing model IT will now be able to accurately chargeback the business units for their services. Business units will now be enabled to directly see their cost in comparison to consumption of IT resources. This allows them to compare internal versus external cost and rest assured they are getting the most for their spend.

By leveraging their newly optimized internal services with certain cloud services, in-house IT pros can build a hybrid offering that encompasses the best possible solution and cost for the business units. Not only will this cement IT’s strategic partnership with the business units, it demonstrates how IT is supplying the optimal solution—be it internal or external—and fosters the idea that the business units should involve IT in all projects. These strategic steps in turn reduce—or even eliminate—the Shadow IT movement, which in some cases can be destructive to a company.

Lastly, as demonstrated above, if IT combines its newly formed ITaaS model with other available cloud services the enterprise truly becomes agile and scalable with limitless potential previously unavailable. This is another proof point around why ITaaS helps IT departments becomes a strategic contributor to the enterprise.

Is ITaaS for everyone?

The answer to this question should be answered by each enterprise. ITaaS can be a powerful and game-changing shift for the IT department, though the process is resource intensive and time consuming.

The argument can be made that the transformation into ITaaS is only justified for larger organizations that churn out more projects. That said, it’s important for every IT department to understand the benefits ITaaS delivers and try to incorporate them into their organization no matter the size. Smaller organizations can implement pieces of ITaaS in order to achieve standardization, lower cost and improved delivery.

In conclusion

The Cloud has reached a tipping point and is here to stay—and that is a good thing in many ways. It is driving down the cost of IT and delivering innovation.

As an IT pro, harness the power of the Cloud and use it to your advantage, but also learn from its benefits and build a version of ITaaS in your enterprise that fits the need of your organization. If you do this, I know you will not only succeed, but thrive. Never forget IT requires continuous improvement and Cloud providers are pushing the limits so you better keep up.

By Marc Malizia

5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Won

5 Companies That Took On The Small Business Cloud – And Won

The Small Business Cloud

We take a look at 5 world-leading tech companies that have brought ground-breaking new cloud services to SMEs 

Plenty of organisations have broken into new markets with innovative cloud-based products. Discover which companies have successfully taken on the small business Cloud.

Cloud based computer systems are ideally suited to support the needs of small businesses. Whereas traditional business support systems are installed on a company server or individual desktop computers, meaning each has to be managed and maintained by the business, cloud solutions offer software as a service (SAAS) that can be accessed over the internet.

Cloud software does not require expensive hardware upgrades or IT technicians to install and configure complex systems, making it a much cheaper investment for smaller, growing businesses. However, many service providers have developed solutions for big businesses with big budgets that SMEs cannot afford.

Here, we discuss some of the companies that have put the needs of SMEs first and foremost and are creating excellent solutions that can be implemented in small offices.

Sage

Sage was founded in 1981 in Newcastle, UK, by a businessman and an ex-NASA computer scientist. Their aim was to create a more efficient way for businesses to generate quotations. The result was the development of an innovative piece of accounting software that was launched to the market as Sage.

Sage quickly became a leader in business accounting software and in 1999, just 18 years after its development, it became a FTSE 100 company. Sage is now going through a new phase of growth thanks to its cloud based accounting product, Sage 200 Online. Their software is a perfect choice for growing businesses that need to scale up their accounting and software packages quickly to meet increasing demand.

By creating a cloud based solution, Sage is able to deliver its software to a global market. Sage recognises that small businesses have limited IT budgets and provides affordable but scalable packages to suit. The results? One of the world’s leading business accounting packages is now available globally over the internet.

Salesforce

Salesforce Service Cloud Logo

The Salesforce team recognised the potential of offering CRM over the internet very early on and launched Salesforce.com in 1999. Today, Salesforce is one of the world’s largest cloud computing companies, with over 100,000 customers and 2.1 million subscribers.

Since launching, Salesforce has made almost 30 acquisitions to ensure that it remains a global leader in cloud CRM. It has also developed two parallel products, Force.com, a platform as a service (PaaS) and Data.com, a cloud-based business database. Both of these products operate direct from the Salesforce infrastructure.

CRM was only developed as a software concept during the 1990s. Salesforce’s insight allowed the company to develop the first cloud CRM product and quickly corner the market.

PayPal

PayPal was developed in 1998, the same year as Google. When it was first introduced, PayPal was a money transfer service for Cofinity, its parent company. The PayPal product was launched in 1999 and its rapid success resulted in the company name change.

PayPal was soon purchased by eBay, who saw the advantage of owning their own internet payment service. For many years PayPal continued to be a simple solution to allow people to transfer funds online.

PayPal’s best strategic move was to start working with global banking institutions to allow PayPal customers to accept payments from credit and debit cards and transfer funds to and from their customer’s bank accounts. This allowed them to launch their PayPal for business solutions, which allow businesses around the world to make fast and secure payments for services.

Prior to PayPal, businesses needed to make cash transfers using banking IBAN codes – a much more complex and time consuming process. PayPal is now helping businesses globally; it operates in 203 markets and has over 150 million active account holders.

Cisco

Cisco was founded in 1984 as a computer network provider when the internet was first being developed. Cisco has rapidly evolved to remain at the forefront of computing network technology and provide businesses with affordable and robust solutions.

Cisco have embraced the Internet of Everything, or as they call it, the InterCloud, and produce services that help small businesses integrate Internet based services into their workflow. The connection of devices and machines allows businesses to dynamically generate and analyse business data.

In 2013 they acquired Sourcefire, network security software that operates over the Cloud. In the same year they also acquired SolveDirect, a cloud-based solution that allows businesses to integrate with service partners and automate the sharing of information.

Microsoft

microsoft-cloud-t

Microsoft has always supported small businesses, but its latest cloud offerings take this to a new level. Every Windows user will be familiar with Microsoft’s core office software solutions; these are usually installed on a computer when the Windows operating system is first installed.

Microsoft’s cloud services provide businesses with CRM, conferencing and email without the need to install and manage software in-house. These services are great for small businesses because they provide monthly subscriptions so that businesses are not tied-in to products that fail to meet specific business needs. Microsoft helps small businesses to set up systems by using a network of third party suppliers, which although are not required, can make the transition much smoother for small businesses with little experience with IT and software installations.

The rapid development of cloud based software services is revolutionising how small businesses operate. The major players continue to develop services designed to support businesses of all sizes, and as a result, our SMEs are able to compete in a wider economic market.

Stay tuned this week for the continuation…5 companies that took on the small business cloud – and lost!

By Gary Gould

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Computing – The Game Changer

Cloud Computing – The Game Changer

Global Cloud Index In October, Cisco released its Global Cloud Index (GCI) report for 2014-2019, projecting a near 3-fold growth of global data center traffic, with predictions that this traffic will reach 8.6 zettabytes (cloud data center traffic) and 10.4 zettabytes (total data center traffic) per year in 2019 and 80% of it will come…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Cloud Infographic – Big Data Analytics Trends

Cloud Infographic – Big Data Analytics Trends

Big Data Analytics Trends As data information and cloud computing continues to work together, the need for data analytics continues to grow. Many tech firms predict that big data volume will grow steadily 40% per year and in 2020, will grow up to 50 times that. This growth will also bring a number of cost…

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter

Using Big Data To Make Cities Smarter The city of the future is impeccably documented. Sensors are used to measure air quality, traffic patterns, and crowd movement. Emerging neighborhoods are quickly recognized, public safety threats are found via social networks, and emergencies are dealt with quicklier. Crowdsourcing reduces commuting times, provides people with better transportation…

Cloud Infographic: Programming Languages To Build Your Cloud

Cloud Infographic: Programming Languages To Build Your Cloud

Programming Languages What programming languages are the building blocks to help develop and facilitate these present and future cloud platforms? Where can we learn and develop these skills in order to help us build our own careers? A couple of options would be to visit sites such as Stackoverflow which can provide you with a good source of information.…

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Small Business Cloud Computing Trepidation is inherently attached to anything that involves change and especially if it involves new technologies. SMBs are incredibly vulnerable to this fear and rightfully so. The wrong security breach can incapacitate a small startup for good whereas larger enterprises can reboot their operations due to the financial stability of shareholders. Gordon Tan contributed an…

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Benefits of Cloud Computing Based on Aberdeen Group’s Computer Intelligence Dataset, there are more than 1.6 billion permutations to choose from when it comes to cloud computing solutions. So what, on the face of it, appears to be pretty simple is actually both complex and dynamic regardless of whether you’re in the market for networking,…

Infographic: IoT Programming Essential Job Skills

Infographic: IoT Programming Essential Job Skills

Learning To Code As many readers may or may not know we cover a fair number of topics surrounding new technologies such as Big data, Cloud computing , IoT and one of the most critical areas at the moment – Information Security. The trends continue to dictate that there is a huge shortage of unfilled…

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Off Premise Corporate Data Storage Cloud storage is a broad term. It can encompass anything from on premise solutions, to file storage, disaster recovery and off premise options. To narrow the scope, I’ve dedicated the focus of today’s discussion to the more popular cloud storage services—such as Dropbox, Box, OneDrive—which are also known as hosted,…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

Box.net, Amazon Cloud Drive The online (or cloud) storage business has always been a really interesting industry. When we started Box in 2005, it was a somewhat untouchable category of technology, perceived to be a commodity service with low margins and little consumer willingness to pay. All three of these factors remain today, but with…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…