Category Archives: Cloud Computing

The Role Cloud Technology Plays in the Recruiting Industry

The Role Cloud Technology Plays in the Recruiting Industry

The Recruiting Industry

Like most other established industries, the recruiting industry is being disrupted by new business models and cutting-edge technologies. From recruiting technology talent with a highly publicized hackathon, to handling graphic or even online versions or resumes, recruiting agencies are seeing new challenges and opportunities every day.


Yet, the goal is still the same; deliver superior talent to client organizations in record time.

The promises of cloud-based, software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications for operating recruiting agencies promise substantial performance gains over traditional paper-based offices operating with miles of paper files.

Lower costs

The cost of all that paper and steel in those filing cabinets adds up. One of the big costs is the square footage of the floor space just to keep those files accessible. Even paper-based offices need computers. This means hardware and locally installed software, possibly even servers for client-server software, that has to be maintained, upgraded, and supported by a technical staff of some kind. And then there are the costs of either a catastrophic failure of hardware including not just replacement of equipment, but also loss of productivity, missing deadlines and jeopardizing client relationships. All these costs, financial and opportunity, look pretty intimidating from a cost-center perspective when compared to subscription costs of cloud-based software.

Additionally, the installation costs for cloud-based software are zilch. While the up-front costs of setting up an IT infrastructure have continued to decline in recent years, the installation costs of a cloud-based system are minuscule in comparison.

Increased agility

With cloud-based software, it becomes feasible to offer to support a client at a recruiting event at a college or by hosting a hackathon in a venue that has the infrastructure and insurance to support a public event. This type of support that can differentiate an agency from its competitors simply isn’t possible for an agency with paper forms, locally installed software and a more traditional business model.

Stronger relationships


Because of the flexibility to meet emerging client needs, recruiting firms that adopt cloud-based technologies position themselves to respond to the client rather than requiring the client to conform to the agency’s business processes.

This includes business process flexibility as well as special services like being able to customize online forms to conform to each client’s preferences.

All these adaptive practices make a cloud-based recruiter more valuable to its clients and, this in turn, yields stronger relationships that work both ways.

Enhanced Reporting

Periodic performance reporting, status reporting and audit compliance are often major sources of angst in traditional recruiting firms.

Online software providers know they have to have robust reporting features, so they are able to build them in because the cost of enhanced reporting capabilities are ultimately spread over a broad population of customers. Customizing local software is often prohibitively expensive, as is extracting data and building custom reports for clients.

Oftentimes, SaaS systems provide access for clients to log into the system and check statuses though a client dashboard without ever having to communicate with the agency. This saves time for everyone.

Flexible Staffing

With cloud-based software, recruiters can work from anywhere there is a broadband connection. This means recruiting agencies can hire talented recruiters regardless of where they live rather than having to recruit recruiters from a local population within the vicinity of an office.

This means recruiting agencies can staff their own teams with the best available talent, talent that already has experience with the SaaS software rather than having to hire local talent that has to be trained on the software.

It also means agencies can operate with lower overhead because offices no longer have to be large monolithic structures to house files and cube farms.

Seamless API integration with client ERP systems

Increasingly, SaaS software providers are publishing APIs for their software that allow for secure and seamless integration with client ERP and HR systems, which may themselves be cloud-based. This allows clients to be more efficient in setting-up and on boarding new talent after the recruiting process is complete. API integrations also extend to LinkedIn, one of the preferred online venues for recruiters looking for leads.

Sales-force automation (SFA) and customer relationship management (CRM) software have led the way online for enterprises. As more recruiting gets outsourced, more of the recruiting services available with be cloud-based. The handwriting is on the wall for those willing to read it.

By Nick Rojas / @NickARojas

Nick is a Business Consultant and Journalist from California who has written for a number of online publications such as Entrepreneur, Techcrunch and

Public or Private Cloud: Costs The Main Factor After All?

Public or Private Cloud: Costs The Main Factor After All?

Are Cloud Costs The Main Factor?

Even though private and public cloud is usually a choice between flexibility/security and loss of control versus keeping it, there is increasing evidence that, for all the benefits of the public cloud, many companies would actually save by establishing a private cloud. A report on the subject states that companies spending more than $7,644 monthly at AWS should consider moving to the private cloud. However, let’s not take that figure at face value but examine it a bit further instead.

Is cost a fair measure for the cloud?


You may ask: is the focus on costs not misreading the whole enterprise? Using the cloud is, after all, a trade-off between having resources at your disposal and being able to increase workload or remove unused instances as needed. Furthermore, there are issues like latency, compliance to standards, as well the logistics–because you can’t realistically predict the workload early in the project–that the cloud addresses with ease but that take a lot of deliberation to solve with a private solution. And they can’t be put in an equation because they’re unique to each business.

On the other hand, there’s a growing trend that more and more startups follow. They start with a public cloud and afterwards move to a hybrid with an emphasis on private cloud. Companies like HubSpot and Moz started off with a public cloud (AWS) and later on, when the workloads were more or less stable, moved to an OpenStack hybrid cloud with the public cloud, presumably reserved for either testing or peak periods of activity. Moz report to have saved $3.4m by moving to a private solution.

This is quite likely accounted for by that most applications have a rather stable regular workload that only rarely experiences spikes. The predictable workload, if large enough to make it financially beneficial, should be moved to private cloud, but the public cloud would be used for activity spikes.

Then again, many caveats exist for the private cloud as well. There’s the reliability problem, which can be dealt with by using different data centers; then there’s the capital investment required to set up a private cloud, and this for some companies is simply insurmountable. As can be seen, these two are also going to be different for each business.

To conclude, even though a private cloud solution may turn out to be cheaper, the move to it, as well as away from it, should be made after careful deliberation. Just as there are no two identical businesses, there are no identical cloud solutions, so let’s just say that the figure cited at the beginning is, at best, a very rough estimate.

By Lauris Veips

Four Considerations for Businesses Who Want To Participate In the Internet of Things

Four Considerations for Businesses Who Want To Participate In the Internet of Things

Businesses Who Want To Participate In the Internet of Things

The internet of things is one of the biggest technology buzzwords at the moment, and with good reason. As more devices come online, more opportunities for enterprises present themselves, and more people engage with the industry, there is a belief that by 2020 we could see almost all our frequently used home appliances become part of our networks.

From a business perspective, there are innumerable possibilities and potential pitfalls. High-speed networks, machine-to-machine platforms, big data and analytics, mobile solutions and enhanced security are all helping companies drive efficiency, increase revenue, and improve their customer experience – but only if implemented properly.


Here are four things businesses need to consider:

1) Participation is Key

The internet of things provides lots of new ways for businesses to stay ahead of the curve in their respective markets. Those that don’t embrace the opportunity will struggle to survive as competitors continue to disrupt the market.

For example – companies used to manipulate their inventories to account for unknown expenditures, but machine-to machine technology now lets them able to track inventory throughout its supply chain. It lets businesses significantly decrease inventory and nearly eliminate the guesswork of demand planning. The saved capital can instead be spent on growth initiatives, thus keeping the enterprise on the front foot.

2) A Portal for Innovation

The new revenue streams created by the internet of things are opening the door to innovations that weren’t possible a decade ago.

An example of this is gun crime. Start-up ShotStopper is installing arrays of interconnected computer-powered acoustic devices in a city which can instant detects and locate gunshots, before delivering real-time data alerts to dispatch centres, patrol cars and smart phones.

3) Improved Customer Experience

The advanced capabilities of the internet of things means companies are now able to deliver more personalised applications that can enhance the customer experience – with companies now aiming to engage with their clients at every stage of the lifecycle – from identification and acquisition to service and support.

4) Customers Need Help

While the internet of things offers significant potential for businesses, it could have a negative impact if not managed appropriately. Whereas homes of twenty years only had very limited inter-device connectivity, the home of the future will cause will the number of daily interactions which pair consumers with internet-connected devices and touch points to grow massively.

It means the potential for misunderstanding, malfunction and misuse is vast. It turn, it means companies are likely to have a requirement for a much larger and more technically minded customer support infrastructure.

What do you think?

Does your business use the internet of things? What tips would you give to another business looking to get involved? Let us know in the comments below.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Daniel Price

Public vs. Private vs. Hybrid: Which Cloud Is Right for Your Business?

Public vs. Private vs. Hybrid: Which Cloud Is Right for Your Business?

Public vs. Private vs. Hybrid

The debate surrounding the deliverability of cloud computing is coming to a close. Businesses have begun to rapidly adopt the use of cloud services, courtesy the ROI this disruptive technology brings to the table. They have finally realized they cannot afford to ignore the cloud.

A Forrester study found that 76% of large enterprises have a formal cloud strategy in place; this means businesses have begun placing their trust in the cloud and are trying to leverage its use to drive business growth.


The reason behind mass cloud adoption is that businesses are experiencing the benefits of the cloud. Lower total cost of ownership (TCO), improved customer support/service, more flexibility to react to changing market conditions, innovation, real- time collaboration amongst employees are just some of the benefits of moving to the cloud. As can be imagined, you, as a business owner, will be doing a big disservice to your business if you are not using cloud based technology to make it more competitive.

If you are planning to sign up for a cloud based service, you can choose from three types of cloud models, namely: Public, Private and Hybrid. One of the important decisions business owners and IT managers must make vis-à-vis cloud migration is about the cloud model they need to choose.

Is it best to go for a public cloud approach or opt for a private cloud solution?
Should I adopt private cloud for my business or consider a hybrid cloud solution?

The right answers to these questions will determine whether your business is able to make the most of the cloud or not. There are some key factors you need to consider for zeroing in on the right cloud model for your business. Let’s take a look:

Public vs. Private vs. Hybrid Breakdown:

First, let’s understand the key differences between Public, Private and Hybrid cloud. You can’t really decide which one is better for your business if you don’t understand exactly how they are different.

Public Cloud:

A public cloud is cloud infrastructure in which a service provider makes applications, storage and resources available to multiple tenants over the Internet. In this model, the core infrastructure is shared between different businesses, but data and applications are logically separated allowing access only to authorized users. Public cloud services may be free to use or available on a pay-per-use model. Public clouds are offered by well-known providers such as Amazon AWS, Google and Microsoft.



Private Cloud:

According to Wikipedia:

Private cloud (also called internal cloud or enterprise cloud) is cloud infrastructure operated solely for a single organization, whether managed internally or by a third-party service provider, and hosted either internally or externally.

In this model, applications, server or resources are dedicated to a particular business and not shared with other businesses; businesses have control over their data. With a private cloud, you have more control over the cloud infrastructure because it resides on-premise. When you are using a private cloud service, it’s only your business that can access its resources; you are not sharing them with anybody else.

Hybrid Cloud:

Hybrid cloud is a coming together of two or more clouds (private, community or public). Hence, hybrid cloud covers best of both worlds by offering the benefits of multiple deployment models. Such cloud provides access to both internal and external services provided by internal and external cloud respectively.

Is Private Better than Public?

The selection of public or private cloud depends on a number of factors like security of data and applications, future scalability, regulatory concerns, company’s budget, etc.

Public cloud has the ability to scale quickly, trigger rapid innovations, reduce investments in costly infrastructure and helps you extend geographic reach whereas private cloud addresses security issues better than public cloud.

Businesses in a sensitive industry like financial services, ecommerce or health that require more data control and security should choose a private cloud infrastructure. On the other hand, businesses that need to deal with less critical data must choose a public cloud service.

SMBs, home based businesses or individual departments in large organizations should go for public cloud if they don’t have any security concerns or are looking for cheaper and scalable services in response to specific business needs.

To put it simply, businesses that have certain IT resources or data that cannot be outsourced for security reasons and who want to be in complete charge of data accessibility, should opt for a private cloud. Typically, it is large organizations that usually see sense in using a private cloud. The flip side of opting for private cloud is you won’t be able to scale up easily and it will add to your overheads.

Hybrid Cloud is the Best Option?

An enterprise must opt for hybrid cloud when it wants to get the best of both worlds – private and public. For example it has a bunch of data that it doesn’t mind putting on the public cloud, and it also has some highly sensitive data that it wants to keep on-premise by using the private cloud.

This hybrid approach allows a business to take advantage of the scalability and cost-effectiveness of public cloud services and at the same time makes sure that sensitive data is kept absolutely secure in the private cloud.

However, the negative aspect when going for a hybrid cloud solution is that businesses will have to fine tune the lines of collaboration and communication between Public and Private cloud users. You will also have to keep an eye out for some security issues rearing their ugly heads; you might have to invest a lot of time and money in keeping your private cloud secure.

Final Analysis

When considering the transition to virtual servers from physical on-site servers, it’s important that you consider which type of cloud service best meets your business goals and requirements. The needs must mainly be prioritized in terms of cost, scalability, security, flexibility and control over data.

After considering all these factors, carefully consider the options available from the cloud service provider to make an informed decision regarding the cloud model that is the best fit for your business.

If you have enjoyed Stan Roach’s post, leave your comment below; or if you want to read more from him, check Agiliron’s Blogs.

By Stan Roach

Keeping A Lid On Your Data

Keeping A Lid On Your Data

Data Discretion

As discussed on CloudTweaks not too long ago, invisibility is the one thing that’s very important when bringing the Internet of Things to the kitchen. That is, the process of working a home appliance has to be convenient to the point of invisibility, just like it’s with tap water–it’s simply there when we need it, even if we don’t quite know how.

Then again, in this day and age we take ease of use for granted, because most non-techies wait until a new product has become convenient before going to the store. Furthermore, kitchen appliances are high-involvement purchases, and no one wants anything cumbersome or slow in their kitchen. It just has to work.

That’s why it can be argued that the most important thing for the way people will perceive IoT devices, both in their kitchens and in general, is this: what’ll happen to the data these devices generate? Let’s elaborate a bit. In a few years there will be millions of grown ups that have most of their lives documented on social networks. Millions of them will have been embarrassed by something they shared online, or perhaps something–like overly personal, intrusive ads or personalized spam–will have taught them the value of keeping touchy data to themselves. People are bound only to become more and more data-reticent in time.


This becomes crucially important for the long-term success of the IoT, because the data that will be recorded will become much more important once it’s recorded in our homes, not to mention when it’ll come right off our bodies as it is with wearables. It’s great if the fridge can remind us to get milk, a vending machine can help us stick to our diet, or a prep pad can suggest us something healthy to eat, but privacy issues are bound to spring up once a data-hungry app layer is added upon the digital ecosystem of our homes.

This was the case when people raised privacy concerns with the Nest acquisition by Google. The reason is quite evident: it’s just too close to home. And that’s the case with all of the household IoT devices. Even though benign and beneficial, there’s increased tension to know what exactly happens with the data pulled from the sensors. We wouldn’t want to have to scratch our heads if we find a weight watchers ad in our mailbox a month after we’ve started using our smart fridge.

The solution is simple: more user control over data. Not only should users control what data to share, but with whom to share it. Companies should be very conscientious about this, but in return they might find that their user base is much more cooperative. If inchoate policies like the “New Data Deal” come to fruition, perhaps we’ll see a future that’s clearer in terms of what we’re giving away and what, exactly, we’re getting in return.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Lauris Veips

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Drop Zone

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Drop Zone

29DroneDeliveryGoneWrong(FP) (1)

By Alton Johnson

Are you looking to supercharge your Newsletter, Powerpoint presentation, Social media campaign or Website? Our universally recognized tech related comics can help you. Contact us for information on our commercial licensing rates.

CloudTweaks Comics
The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…


Sponsored Partners