Category Archives: Cloud Computing

It’s Not Delivery, Its Cloud

It’s Not Delivery, Its Cloud

It’s Not Delivery, Its Cloud

Earlier in the month I talked about Bouillabaisse a fish stew or as I called it Cloud Bouillabaisse both are heavily reliant on what you put in it. Building on that food theme (I have to stop writing these blogs at dinner time…) I would like to talk about cloud pizza this time. But in this case we aren’t making the food we are ordering it.


The typical pizza place offers a variety of options. Depending on the type and nature of the pizza (Chicago style that is real pizza and then New York style which is more like saltines with ketchup on them. Ouch!) you can choose the types of cheese and the various toppings. Depending on the establishment, you can order pizza with Gyros meat, or pizza with fresh basil or if you have the budget, pizza with Caviar . Once you pick the toppings you can even pick the sauce at many places as they offer white sauce, red sauce and even the no sauce at all option. (Image Source:


You start picking the components you want on your Pizza. It’s very similar to what you do when you look at various Cloud Service Providers. They offer you a pick list of options. From the number of processors to the amount of network bandwidth, you plan to consume you can customize everything. So the pricing can be confusing at times. That’s why they offer you calculators so when you do review the pricing, it all comes together neatly so you can quickly check out.

Are You Sure?

What’s sometimes missing is the intelligence of the smart person working at the CSP who truly understands your needs and can put together a viable solution which help you. That Pizza delivery person that has been to your house 100 times and knows that one of you loves white sauce but not all of you. So if the order has five white sauce pizza’s rather than just the one, make sure the smart delivery person calls and says “are you sure?

A cloud “Are you sure?” button would factor in not only the things you have purchased in the past, but also an understanding of your organizational goals. Let’s call it a cloud picker. The”Are you sure?” button would encompass first off only those things your organization has in their catalog today. Following the ITIL Service Catalog model we would make sure that only those things IT can support today are available on the “Are you sure” page. We would need some form of validation (user) and validation (project). That should probably be a barrier to entry. Rather than allowing someone all the way to the checkout page we verify that they can start the process first. In the Pizza delivery world that is the range delivery folks are willing to travel (no more than 3 miles from the store etcetera…). So first, we verify the user in question is in the delivery zone.

Once we know we can deliver the pizza we then verify that the user is who they say they are (authorization and authentication). We can then walk them through a much simplified ordering process for what they need. Then they click place an order. We show them a simple page that starts off with ARE YOU SURE?. Below that we show them the capabilities they are ordering (to confirm). We can then launch the pizza into the oven. From there it is only 30 minutes or so to dinner.

Unless of course we made a mistake and in the final check we get an ARE YOU SURE? Call. It’s important that we have a validation process just in case someone isn’t paying attention. It’s also important to know that our CSP is also paying attention.

By Scott Anderson

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Wristwatch

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Wristwatch

By Al Johnson

Are you looking to supercharge your Newsletter, Powerpoint presentation, Social media campaign or Website? Our universally recognized tech related comics can help you. Contact us for information on our commercial licensing rates.

A Look At The Cloud Storage Wars In 2014

A Look At The Cloud Storage Wars In 2014

Cloud Storage Wars


More people are starting to use cloud storage as an additional or even primary method to store and backup their data, thanks to the increasing reliability and advancement of cloud computing technologies. The technology is being used in almost every industry imaginable, from personal use to government (more than half of the US government has already moved to the cloud).

By 2016, the cloud storage industry is expected to generate over $4.04 Billion in Revenue, according to a forecast by Statista – and it’s only going to go up from there. More than 70% of businesses and IT professionals have already implemented cloud storage solutions or plan to in the near future, and 3 out of 4 IT professionals attribute cloud storage as the #1 reason for migrating to the cloud.

The Competitors

With an overwhelming amount of cloud storage solutions, it can be hard to choose which service is best for you – are security technologies like encryption important to you? Do you use a large amount of data? Or do you need to be able to upload and share files quickly? Take a look at the Infographic below, created by Cirrus Files which highlights more cloud storage industry statistics and compares three of the top competitors in the cloud storage wars: Box, Google Drive and Dropbox.


Money, Currency And The Internet of Everything

Money, Currency And The Internet of Everything

Money, Currency And The Internet of EverythingBitcoin

Imagine taking the subway, and instead of paying for it by fishing out a handful of change, you simply walk in, with a wearable, perhaps a bracelet or pendant, signing you in as you enter the subway and signing out once you leave. The subway system’s turnstile computers calculate the distance taken on your trip and charge an appropriate amount to your BitCoin wallet. This may be the future of money in the age of the Internet of Everything.

Every culture and country needs a currency – something to act as a centrally accepted means of exchange, and the same is true in the centerless world of the Internet of Everything. A growing trend towards using virtual currencies is emerging in parallel with the developments in technology, people and processes that the IoE represents.

Most prominent currently is BitCoin, a form of virtual money that, despite a rocky start, continues to endure, with merchants around the world – from Subway sandwich franchises through to airlines and law firms, willing to accept it. The important distinction to make, however, is that BitCoin is not simply a new and improved channel for transferring existing currency, the way a credit card is. It is virtual, created from complicated computer codes and held in a virtual wallet. It exists and is made safe through distributed computing. It is owned by no government and regulated by no central body.

In terms of the Internet of Everything, virtual currencies such as BitCoin allow for a wider range of actions that traditional banks find too costly to touch, and who make too expensive to use, such as micro-transactions. These small purchases may be the equivalent of a couple of cents, and would allow consumers, or their IoE-enabled possessions, to pay a small fee for to access a single news story on a news website, for example, removing the need for banner ads and other old-school monetization techniques, and allowing a greater sense of pay-as-you-go-only-for-what-you-need.

BitCoin is not the only virtual currency out there. In fact there are many dozens, if not hundreds of virtual currencies vying for market attention. BitCoin is only the most famous of the bunch – for now. But together they represent change, and a significant move toward decentralization and virtualization, just as cloud technologies are doing with big data.

The online travel portal, already accepts payment in BitCoin. As CEO Jeff Klee explains, one of the main reasons for doing so was customer demand.

The idea to accept BitCoin originally came from a customer,” Klee says. “One of our travel advisors got the request and began asking around about it. I heard about it and got very intrigued by the idea so I started looking into it. I soon realized that Bitcoin would actually be pretty easy and very feasible to accept.”

Klee points out that as a currency BitCoin offers everything needed to manage a transaction. “From a purely practical standpoint, it almost doesn’t make sense for a company NOT to take BitCoin. There are third party processors out there who make it very easy to do (we use Coinbase), and they will allow merchants to accept as much or as little of the volatility risk (or reward) as they want. If there are a certain number of customers who prefer to pay in BitCoin, why would any company not want to accommodate them?

On a higher level, Klee recognizes that virtual currencies are driving change, and moving economies out of long-held patterns of ownership by banks and credit card companies, along with the service charges which many merchant recognize as being disproportionate to true transaction costs. “It’s past time for an alternative payment system to challenge the entrenched players,” Klee says, “and I think BitCoin can provide just that.”

It is important to recognize a historical continuance: the forms of money that have been used for the past few millennia emerged for the very same reason as their virtual counterparts are now doing. In earlier centuries where every kingdom had its own form of money, gold was recognized as having universal value, which meant every local money could be assessed against its standard. As the age of global computing now leaves the traditional domain of “hard computers,” and becomes instead a resident of the cloud, accessible by mobile applications of all types, the same type of standard is emerging: a currency whose worth and stability will be based on planet-wide distributed computing power, and whose accessibility and ease of use will be made clearer through unfettered access provided by smart clothes, smart appliances and smart everything.

This is a sponsored post InnovateThink by and Cisco.


By Steve Prentice

Cloud ERP Starter’s Guide: When QuickBooks Is Not Enough

Cloud ERP Starter’s Guide: When QuickBooks Is Not Enough

Cloud ERP Starter’s Guide: When QuickBooks Is Not EnoughERP_Workstyle

You’ve been running your small business on QuickBooks, or a product like it, to automate your accounting function and produce basic financial reports. So, what’s wrong? Things just don’t seem to be working well. It takes too long to get a “picture” of how your business is performing, and you’re drowning in paper.

Congratulations: You have outgrown your basic accounting software. The good news is that your business is growing. However, so are your transaction volumes, process complexity, and your information reporting needs. Your business can no longer be reduced to a set of ledgers or independent accounting transactions. Your business is comprised of increasingly complicated, end-to-end business processes such as Procure-to-Pay, Order-to-Cash, Forecast-to-Stock, and Record-to-Report. You need enterprise resource planning (ERP) software that supports these end-to-end processes and provides timely, actionable information regarding business performance.

Wait a minute,” you might say. “I’m not a big business. I don’t have a large IT staff or a robust IT infrastructure, and I certainly don’t have the money to sink into an expensive software package, or the small army of consultants needed to implement it.”

Relax. Your business has grown to a point of complexity during a time when cloud computing can provide a robust, cost-effective solution for small and medium-size enterprise (SMEs) like yours. But don’t take my word for it; ask your business.

Are you experiencing sales growth but also stock-outs because you don’t have the right inventory available to meet customer demand? Or, are you meeting demand but with excess inventory because you’re keeping excess safety stock in order to avoid stock-outs? Are your order fill or item fill rates falling and with them your customer satisfaction? Are customers complaining that their invoices don’t match the goods they ordered or received?

Any or all of these conditions can be a symptom of internal systems’ inability to manage increases in business volume or complexity, or both. They may also be indicative of disconnected transaction systems, which require multiple transaction entry for the same business event (a sales order, a shipment, a return, etc.), thereby increasing the risk of errors and leading to “islands of information.”

Business management software treats business events as end-to-end processes. In an ERP system, when a completed order is shipped, inventory balances are immediately updated and an invoice can be produced. In fact, in many ERP systems the invoice can be electronically sent to the customer, thereby improving collection time and reducing paper. The same is true of the procurement cycle. Purchase orders can be automatically generated based on replacement stock rules and be electronically sent to a vendor. In these ways (and others), an ERP system can reduce transaction cycle time as well as the manpower and paper transactions necessary to execute them.

Perhaps just as important as the integration of related transaction processing is the information collected and available for analysis. Data is instantly updated when transactions occur, meaning that decisions made regarding inventories, cash balances, or purchase commitments are based on the most current information and as a result are more accurate. “Islands of information” are eliminated, and everyone is making decisions based on the same data.

Cloud-based ERP solutions are ideal for small but growing businesses. They can provide robust functionality to support transaction processing, as well as sophisticated reporting capabilities to monitor business operations. Additionally, cloud-based ERP can provide external focus to improve customer service and generate new sales leads through applications such as customer relationship management (CRM). Because cloud-based ERP solutions can be deployed in a variety of platforms and configurations, they reduce initial costs and provide reasonable cost of usage. Yet this flexibility in platform configuration also provides a clear path for future evolution of systems support.

As the business grows and becomes capable of supporting an increased IT infrastructure, cloud-based systems can be brought in-house to be internally hosted. Alternatively, they can be configured in a hybrid arrangement, with some systems in a public cloud and others in a private, internal cloud. This flexible growth path means that initial ERP investments continue to provide a positive return.

But which cloud-based ERP system should you choose? The first choice needs to be between “open source” and “proprietary” software solutions. While open source software has advantages in terms of cost and availability, it is also very new and has potential support and security issues. At this point, open source is not a viable alternative on which to run your business.

Among proprietary cloud solutions, look first at a vendor’s track record. How long have they been in business? What has their year-over-year growth rate been? Remember that you are selecting a vendor for a long-term relationship. Your vendor will provide new and enhanced functionality that your business will need as it grows. Select a vendor with a good track record, a solid financial position, and the potential to grow with you.

Next, look at functionality. Select a vendor whose product has the core modules you need to run your business. Do you need manufacturing support? Do you need lot traceability? Next look for features such as multi-currency support, multi-warehouse support, and varied pricing capabilities. These are features your business may not need today, but you probably will someday as your business grows in terms of size and new markets.

Finally, look for a vendor that has a global reach, with overseas offices and partners who are prepared to help you succeed wherever your business goes.

For more information on Acumatica and its services, please click here.

By Jon Roskill

2014 Future Of Cloud Computing Survey Results

2014 Future Of Cloud Computing Survey Results

Engine Yard Joins North Bridge Venture Partners, Gigaom Research and Industry Collaborators to Unveil 2014 Future of Cloud Computing Survey Resultsengine-yard

SAN FRANCISCO, CA–(Marketwired – Jun 25, 2014)Engine Yard, the leading cloud application management platform, today announced its role as a collaborator in releasing the results of the fourth annual Future of Cloud Computing Survey, conducted by North Bridge Venture Partners, Gigaom Research and supported by more than 70 other collaborating organizations. This year’s survey is the largest to date, and is the industry’s deepest and broadest examination of the cloud technology revolution. It analyzed the drivers and inhibitors behind cloud adoption, separating the hype surrounding the cloud from genuine industry trends and real-world cases across a sample of 1,358 respondents.

With four years of data, we’re now really beginning to see some interesting trends, such as the five-fold increase in SaaS (Software as a Service) adoption to 74 percent and the nearly six-fold increase in PaaS (Platform as a Service) adoption to 41 percent,” said Michael Skok, founder of the Future of Cloud program and general partner at North Bridge Venture Partners.

Business managers commonly circumvent lengthy procurement processes and use the cloud to deploy new apps or launch time-sensitive campaigns faster. This can cause headaches for IT departments that have to maintain security and regulatory compliance,” said Rob Walters, CTO for Engine Yard. “The most successful companies are finding ways to reap the benefits of the cloud — agility, efficiency and cost savings — while integrating security and governance best practices to ensure they’re driving business growth without undue risk.”

Select Highlights from the Survey Data:

Cloud Adoption is Strategic

  • 49 percent of respondents in this year’s survey are using cloud to fuel revenue generation or new product creation.
  • 45 percent of businesses say they already, or plan to, run their company from the cloud, showing how integral cloud is to business.

SaaS Adoption Has More Than Quintupled

  • From 11 percent adoption in 2011 to 74 percent in this year’s survey. But in the enterprise it is still mostly transitioning existing applications.
  • The front office is leading the way with sales and marketing at 51 percent adoption, and customer service and analytics both at 43 percent adoption.

IaaS and PaaS Adoption Reaching a Tipping Point

  • 56 percent of businesses are using Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) technologies to harness elastic computing resources.
  • 41 percent of businesses are using PaaS technologies to prototype and develop new applications.

Data Wants to Be Bigger in the Cloud

  • Two thirds of respondents believe their data will come to reside in some form of cloud over the next two years as bigger data needs consolidation, and collaboration and creation go online.

Supporting Links:

  • View the 2014 Future of Cloud Computing Survey Presentation
  • Read the survey results and analysis at
  • Join the conversation: Future of Cloud on Twitter using hashtag #futurecloud and/or @North_Bridge and @futureofcloud.
  • Learn more about Engine Yard at

About North Bridge:

North Bridge Venture Partners and North Bridge Growth Equity are active partners with entrepreneurs providing seed-to-growth financing for innovative companies looking to disrupt big markets. With $3.5 billion in capital currently under management, North Bridge partners, many founders themselves, work with entrepreneurs to apply their expertise in the creation, operation and scaling of market-leaders. The firm has funded more than 170 companies creating many billions in market value. Among those firms are Acquia, Actifio, Cool Planet, Couchbase, Demandware, Mavenir Systems, Paydiant, Proto Labs, Reval and Starent Networks. The firm has offices in Waltham, MA and Palo Alto, CA. To learn more about North Bridge go to For more information on the Future of Cloud Computing program, visit: Follow us at @North_Bridge.

About Engine Yard

Engine Yard is the leading cloud application management platform empowering developers and DevOps to provision, manage and monitor applications in the cloud. Providing unmatched control and choice, Engine Yard delivers a broad and trusted application cloud and expert support that enables organizations to focus on creating great applications, instead of managing their infrastructure. Thousands of customers in 58 countries, from explosive-growth Web startups to Fortune 500 enterprises, run on Engine Yard. Headquartered in San Francisco, Calif., Engine Yard is backed by Benchmark, New Enterprise Associates, Oracle and Amazon.

Survey Suggests Data Loss And Unauthorized Access Are Key To Internet Of Things

Survey Suggests Data Loss And Unauthorized Access Are Key To Internet Of Things

Survey Suggests Data Loss and Unauthorized Access Are Key to Internet of Things

The high performance network security, enterprise, and data centre firewall company Fortinet have just released the results of their latest survey and found that data loss and unauthorised access are the most important issues facing the internet of things today.

The survey, conducted in June 2014, asked more than 1,800 homeowners across the world about the key issues that effected both their belief in and desire to embrace the internet of things.

Other key findings include:

  • A significant majority – 61 percent – claimed that they believed that ‘connected home’ (a home in which household appliances and home electronics are all connected to the internet) is ‘extremely likely’ to become a reality in the next five years. In India – on average the most positive country about the internet of things – the figure rose as high as 69 percent. This is great news for the industry; there are expected to be 9 billion devices connected to the internet of things by 2018.
  • Data security remains a significant issue across all aspects of internet usage, and the internet of things is no different. Nearly three quarters (69 percent) of respondents to Fortinet’s survey said they were either ‘extremely concerned’ or ‘somewhat concerned’ that a connected appliance could result in a data breach or an exposure of sensitive, personal information. India was once again the highest ranked country, with 81 percent of respondents highlighting the issue.
  • The cost of implementing the internet of things in the home is not a deterrent to most users. When asked “would you be willing to pay for a new wireless router optimised for connected home devices”, 40 percent responded with “definitely” and another 48 percent said “maybe”; in a follow-on question more than 50 percent said they would pay more for their Internet service in order to “enable connected devices to function” in their home. Although, despite consumers’ willingness to pay for a quality infrastructure, homeowners across the world still claimed that price was the number one factor likely to influence them, followed by features/functionality and brand.

(The Internet of Things Landscape) 


(Image Source: Cisco /Beecham Research)

It is inevitable that privacy risks will arise as objects within the internet of things collect and aggregate fragments of data that relate to their service. The collation of multiple data points can swiftly become personal information as events are reviewed in the context of location, time, and recurrence, etc. Similarly to the early days of RFID tags in passports (when US-based passports could initially be read from 10 metres away with eBay equipment worth $250), the manufacturers and developers will need to find a way to eliminate these risks while still taking advantages of the benefits that that internet of things can offer.

It’s not an easy balance to make. What would you do? Let us know in the comments below.

By Daniel Price

Pinup: Atheer Labs Takes Aim At Google Glass With Their 3D AR Glasses

Pinup: Atheer Labs Takes Aim At Google Glass With Their 3D AR Glasses

Pinup: Atheer Labs Takes Aim At Google Glass With Their 3D AR Glasses


If one were to have to choose a single technology that is simply the most anticipated and cool components to hit the scene in a long time, chances are that augmented reality would be a chief pick. Augmented reality, which is also shortened to AR, is defined as: a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented (or supplemented) by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. In essence, what you see and hear can be highly enhanced to produce a whole new mobile experience.

While Google Glass may be the primary focus of the media, in terms of upcoming AR hardware, they are not the only players in the field. In fact, one specific company may release a product that has the capacity to outshine Google Glass. This company would be Atheer Labs.

Atheer Labs was launched in 2013 and is based out of Mountain View, California. Founded by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) graduate, Soulaiman Itani. Atheer Labs started an Indiegogo campaign in 2013, which raised more than two times of the projected goal of $100,000.

soulaiman-itaniThere are a lot of considerations to make with a wearable system, for example people cannot wear glasses that are more than 100 grams for longer than twenty minutes. We were able to get all of the functionality and immersive experience in 75 grams and we’re now putting it in the hands of the developers. We will support them as they create the next generation of immersive and engaging applications.” says CEO and founder, Soulaiman Itani, in regards to their flagship products, the Atheer One and the Atheer Dev Kit

The Hardware

The Atheer One and the Atheer Dev Kit are the driving forces behind the success of Atheer Labs thus far. These devices are 3D, augmented reality headsets, which operate on an Android-based platform. Given that final products are still on their way, solid specs are not yet available. However, expect them to be comfortable for long periods of time and capable of swapping lenses for better tailoring to each users fashion sense.

The Softwareatheer-One-Dev-Kit

One of Atheer Labs’ primary focal points at this stage of the game is the development of a wide and varied library of apps for use on their devices. Since the underlying platform is Android-based, expect to see close to a billion apps that can be used on them. In addition, their strategy of releasing their Dev Kits to developers early will undoubtedly result in new and more exciting apps, designed specifically for use on the Atheer One.


While end users still have quite a bit of a wait in order to try out the Atheer One, which is slated for release sometime next year, the possibilities it presents truly make it a device eminently worth the delay.

By Joe Pellicone

CloudTweaks Comics
Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

Ensure Your Cloud Is Always Operational We have become so accustomed to being online that we take for granted the technological advances that enable us to have instant access to everything and anything on the internet, wherever we are. In fact, it would likely be a little disconcerting if we really mapped out all that…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…


Sponsored Partners