Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Onlive And Steam: A Marriage Between The Two Top Names In Cloud Gaming

Onlive And Steam: A Marriage Between The Two Top Names In Cloud Gaming

Onlive and Steam: A Marriage Between the Two Top Names In Cloud Gaming

By now, virtually everyone has heard of the implosion of cloud-gaming pioneer, Onlive. The company that was once heralded as the final answer to cloud gaming was forced to file an assignment for the benefit of creditors, which would ultimately put them in the hands of investment firm, Lauder Partner.

The reasons behind this meltdown are pretty easy to identify. Reports indicate that Onlive was shelling out over $5 million each month supporting over eight thousand different game servers, while only sporting under two thousand gamers playing at any one time during peak hours. While Onlive claimed an active user base of over 1.5 million subscribers, money is not earned if people are not actually using the service.

So that’s where the story ends, right? Not even close!

Onlive has once again captured the headlines of major news outlets with their recent pairing with online-gaming provider, Steam. This service will be markedly different than what they offered the first time around. Rather than solely offering games themselves, which could be played as much as you wanted for a specific amount of money each month, users will now be able to purchase their games through Steam and play them on any device they own.

How is this accomplished? One word: CloudLift


What Is CloudLift?

Onlive’s new service, dubbed CloudLift, is able to detect which games you have already purchased through Steam and streams them directly to the device you want to use. CloudLift provides support for all aspects of gaming through Steam. This means you can still enjoy multiplayer with other gamers, as well as all of the achievements and download content that is available.

Current CloudLift Games

Given that Onlive and Steam just recently finalized their partnership, it should come as no surprise that the number of currently supported games is pretty small. As of the time of the writing of this article, the number of supported games totaled to around twenty five. However, while the number may be low, AAA titles such as Batman: Arkham City and Darksiders 2 are among the available titles.


Steam integration is not the only way to currently play games through Onlive. PlayPack, a feature that has been with Onlive from the very beginning, is still available for $9.95 per month. With PlayPack, you have access to over 200 games, which can be streamed to a PC, tablet, smartphone or TV. These games are not purchased beforehand, such as what is involved with CloudLift. Rather, all games can be played simply by paying the monthly fee.

Onlive Go

CloudLift is not the only innovation from Onlive to make recent headlines. Onlive Go, which is being promoted as a gateway to virtual worlds, will make its debut with the popular alternate-reality game, Second Life. Onlive Go will provide access to small developers as a way to make it possible for users to play them directly in the cloud.

Onlive’s marriage to Steam is some of the hottest new to hit the cloud gaming industry in a while. Is CloudLift or Onlive Go services you would enjoy? Let us know in the Comments section below!

By Joe Pellicone

Broadband Speeds Around The World

Broadband Speeds Around The World

Broadband Speeds Around The World


If you have you ever wondered who has the world’s fastest internet, and whether speeds differ by country or by provider, the latest State of the Internet report from Akamai provides some answers, says Peter Lawson, marketing manager at iiNet, Australia’s second-largest DSL Internet provider. “Akamai,” he states, “gathers data from the Akamai Intelligent Platform and puts it all together in a handy report at the end of each quarter. The Akamai Intelligent Platform is made up of a distributed network of servers and intelligent software and delivers over two trillion interactions daily. It constantly monitors the Internet conditions to identify and block security threats, and provide optimization advice based on its extensive reach and data.

Lawson points out that according to Akamai’s latest report, in the third quarter of 2013 the global average connection speed increased 10% to 3.6 Mbps, while the global average peak connection speed decreased 5.2% to 17.9 Mbps.

The top 20 fastest Internet speeds according to average peak connection are:

1. Hong Kong, 65.4 Mbps

2. South Korea, 63.6 Mbps

3. Japan, 52 Mbps

4. Singapore, 50.1 Mbps

5. Israel, 47.7 Mbps

6. Romania, 45.4 Mbps

7. Latvia, 43.1 Mbps

8. Taiwan, 42.7 Mbps

9. Netherlands, 39.6 Mbps

10. Belgium, 38.5 Mbps

11. Switzerland, 38.4 Mbps

12. Bulgaria, 37 Mbps

13. United States, 37 Mbps

14. Kuwait, 36.4 Mbps

15. United Arab Emirates, 36 Mbps

16. Britain, 35.7 Mbps

17. Canada, 34.8 Mbps

18. Czech Republic, 34.8 Mbps

19. Macau, 34.4 Mbps

20. Sweden, 33.1 Mbps

Akamai provides a more detailed breakdown through the following infographics: Source: Akamai – The State of the Internet Report, Q3 2013 


Akamai Americas

Asia Pacific

Akamai Asia

Europe, Middle East & Africa

 Akamai Europe

A Different Take

However, Lawson and iiNet point out that there are other lists out there, and they don’t always agree with each other. For example data based on real-time global broadband and mobile data, collated by Ookla, another of the major global internet speed test providers, demonstrates that Hong Kong remains predominant with an average download speed of 72Mbps, but ranks Singapore at number two (compared to number four on Akamai’s list), with an average speed of 60.7 Mbps.

According to Ookla, Romania occupies the number three spot (number six for Akamai), averaging 57.4Mbps, with South Korea at number four (number two for Akamai), with an average download speed of 50.7 Mbps, and Japan fifth fastest (number three for Akamai), with an average speed of 41.3Mbps.

Lawson explains that the reason for the difference in the results is firstly because each list is based on different sources. Akamai uses information it collects from sources around the world that comprise the Akamai Intelligent Platform, whereas Ookla uses information from its own sources. Secondly, the Akamai test is based on average peak connection speeds, while Ookla uses average download speeds. This provides two different perspectives onto the differences in global internet connection speeds.

When we look at the slowest on this list, we can see the Democratic Republic of Congo has a less than impressive average download speed of 0.9Mbps, and Afghanistan is similar with an average speed of 1.07Mbps.

And Australia? According to Ookla, the average download speed in Australia is currently 14.2Mbps, with speeds varying across the country. The average download speed for Australia’s major cities is as follows:

Perth 9.8Mbps

Brisbane 13.5Mbps

Sydney 12.3Mbps

Canberra 16.5Mbps

Melbourne 12Mbps

Adelaide 11.5Mbps

Hobart 13.8Mbps.

This data puts Australia in 52nd place out of 189 countries. However, the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout promises much faster speeds – with five speed tiers available, ranging from Tier 1, with up to 12Mbps download and 1Mbps upload, all the way up to Tier 5, offering up to 100Mbps download and 40Mbps upload.

iiNet is Australia’s second largest DSL Internet Service Provider and the leading challenger in the telecommunications market. They maintain their own super-fast broadband network and support over 1.7 million broadband, telephony and Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) services nationwide.

By Steve Prentice

Post Sponsored By iiNet

How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

For an IT professional whose status was typically defined by the performance efficiencies of the technology in their data center, it can be a difficult reality to accept that the business value users are able to realize from technology has become the new standard by which all of IT is now being measured. It’s not the technology alone that transforms a business. It’s the way the business accesses and uses that technology that is transformative.

Successful organizations today, as a result, are focusing on transforming their businesses not their technology. For example: “The cloud,” while using enhanced technology at its core, is fundamentally business-model based. For businesses to most effectively harness the power of the cloud, they must change their thinking from how to obtain, manage and pay for technology to how to build, expand and strengthen their business.

Focusing on business outcome instead of acquiring technology is leading savvy CIOs and IT pros to embrace the “as-a-service” model. The business case is compelling: Outsourcing aspects of the IT department’s function by purchasing those functions “as a service” can offload repetitive tasks, reduce capital expenditures and increase the time the IT team has to focus on more strategic work. The key is determining which “as-a-service” functions will be of most benefit to your business.

Here are seven ways to build business value with “as-a-service” solutions:


  • Software as a Service (SaaS): Software providers excel in designing solutions for vertical markets, but the delivery of that software in an as-a-service model can be challenging. By partnering with a cloud provider who can tailor a SaaS solution to the provider’s product and market, software providers are better able to provide consistent, always-up service to their clients without the cost and hassle of creating and maintaining the in-house infrastructure required to do the job. Likewise, for enterprise organizations that want to access software on a subscription basis, finding a software provider that is going to market in this manner means faster implementations and a subscription fee that can spin up or down with required usage.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS): Need access to additional compute resources from time to time, but not often enough to justify building them in house? Consider an on-demand IaaS offering that is a self-managed, multi-tenant public cloud infrastructure providing the flexible compute resources, memory and storage necessary to complete projects such as test and development, proof of concept, training, bursting or other short-term needs.
  • Data Center-as-a-Service (DCaaS): Data centers are typically purpose-built with a 15- to 20-year lifespan, while hardware refreshes must happen every three to four years. So it’s safe to say that, if a data center is between five and 10 years old, there are going to be some major deficiencies. Outsourcing select data center functions to the cloud, co-locating a data center, or deploying an energy-efficient, high-density computing modular data center may be the answer.
  • Storage as a Service: Legacy storage simply wasn’t designed with today’s uses in mind. That means there are systemic gaps that may leave an organization exposed to new pressures placed upon it by unpredictable workloads and unrestrained data growth. Most organizations can take advantage of cloud storage, particularly if they have legal requirements to retain large volumes of data for years, including unstructured data like pictures, films and radiology studies, which can result in petabytes of storage and prohibitive costs for media and physical storage. Storage-as-a-service offers affordable monthly terms and the ability to easily increase storage service levels as needed.
  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS): DRaaS solutions are prepackaged services that provide a standard DR failover to a cloud environment. Customers can buy these services on a pay-per-use basis with varying rates based on required recovery point objectives (RPOs) and recovery time objectives (RTOs). Service providers either deploy agents to replicate data and applications or use image-based backups to send data to the cloud.
  • IT Service Desk-as-a-Service: Certain IT functions contribute to the competitive advantage of an organization, but running a service desk is not usually one of them. If outsourcing an IT service desk can cut costs and increase the level of service to end users without sacrificing quality or impacting competitive advantage, it’s clearly something that IT pros should examine for their organization.
  • ITSM – The Mortar in an As-A-Service World: Worried about maintaining control with so many “as-a-service” choices? IT Service Management (ITSM) is a discipline that aligns the delivery of information technology (IT) services with the business at hand. The purpose is to deliver end-to-end services that meet end-user needs. This task has been made more difficult by the introduction of services into the business from providers other than IT, such as cloud services and SaaS, and by the consumerization of service consumption. ITSM is the mortar that holds together the individual components of the new IT delivery model. It’s the solution that maintains order and keeps the reins of control firmly entrenched in the hands of the IT department.

kevinBy Kevin Gruneisen, Logicalis Senior Director Cloud and Data Center Solutions

Kevin has nearly 30 years of experience in the Infrastructure Technology business. His key responsibilities at Logicalis are focused on matching Logicalis’ capabilities with the cloud and data center needs of its customers. Kevin joined Logicalis in 2004 when Logicalis acquired Solution Technology, Inc. He began his career in technology with IBM in 1984. 

Lag: Effective Solutions To The Most Common Obstacle In Cloud Gaming

Lag: Effective Solutions To The Most Common Obstacle In Cloud Gaming

Lag: Effective Solutions To The Most Common Obstacle In Cloud Gaming


Have you ever been tooling around a virtual world, poised to strike an unwitting victim, when all of a sudden a delay in the game occurs that causes you to lose the kill? If so, you can count yourself as one of the untold millions that have experienced the bane of online gaming: lag.

Lag, also known as latency, is usually defined as the time that passes between the commands you input with your controller, keyboard or mouse and the reaction by the remote server used to run the game. Lag is usually caused by the fact that virtually no game files exist on the client, or individual player, side of things. As a result, any updates, such as movement or shooting, need to be relayed back and forth across the network.

So now that we know what lag is, how do we avoid it? Fortunately, there are several potential options to cut lag as much as possible, or virtually do away with it altogether.


Lag is not only caused by the sending and receiving of game updates between the client and server. Another cause is the user’s display being unable to process update requests fast enough. This makes the issue solely a client-side problem and not one that involves bandwidth concerns.

OLED, which stands for organic light emitting diode, brings a reduction in latency by up to fifty percent. A prime example, the Oculus Rift, will use OLED technology to substantially reduce the lag from turning your head or changing the display angle. Not only will this help your performance in the game, it will also preclude you from getting sick from latency and motion blur.


One seminar in specific at his year’s GDC (Game Developer’s Conference) dealt exclusively with the issue of lag in cloud gaming. Entitled RapidFire: The Easy Route To Low Latency Cloud Gaming Solutions, this seminar presented AMD’s answers to lag, such as optimal network bandwidth and the simplification of different hardware controls.


AMD is not the only computing giant that has the potential answer to latency issues in cloud gaming. Dubbed nVidia Grid, this platform claims to reduce latency by converting game frames into an H.264 movie before they are sent. The process has been further streamlined by eliminating many of the steps needed to create and deliver these frames to individual game clients.

Personal Options

There are tons of different things you can try on your end if you continue to experience lag. These suggestions deal solely with the effectiveness of your device and bandwidth.  Suggestions range from the obvious, such as closing bandwidth-intensive programs, to more involved solutions like tweaking the individual graphics settings of your game.


As the hardware used by both cloud-gaming providers and players evolves more and more in power over the years, expect the issue of lag to one day fall into obscurity. Faster servers, more optimized game code and more powerful client-side devices will all join together to put this obstacle to bed.

Do you have a solution for lag not presented here? Let us know in the Comments section below!

(Image Source:

Did The NSA Know About Heartbleed?

Did The NSA Know About Heartbleed?

Did The NSA Know About Heartbleed?

As the world comes to terms with the full seriousness of the Heartbleed bug, questions are starting to be asked about the role that the National Security Agency (NSA) may have played in the security flaw. On the morning of Friday 11th April rumours started to circulate on social media sites such as Twitter and Reddit, and it wasn’t long before they were picked up by the mainstream press.


Bloomberg published an article claiming that two people close to the NSA had informed them that the infamous government agency had known about Heartbleed for as long as two years – using it to gather critical intelligence, obtain passwords, and grab other basic data that ultimately became the foundation for its recent-unveiled hacking operations.

Knowledge of the Heartbleed flaw supposedly allowed the agency to bypass strong encryption systems – the same systems that had been hailed by Edward Snowden as “one of the few things that you can rely on” in a Q&A session with British newspaper The Guardian in June 2013.

Social media users came down on both sides of the argument, some praising the NSA for using the bug to their advantage, whilst others criticised the agency for allowing the flaw to carry on for so long unreported.




The agency initially declined to comment on the story, but by mid-afternoon they were forced to deny that they had any knowledge of the glitch. NSA spokesperson Vanee Vines issued the following statement to the media:

“NSA was not aware of the recently identified vulnerability in OpenSSL, the so-called Heartbleed vulnerability, until it was made public in a private-sector cybersecurity report. Reports that say otherwise are wrong” 

The statement was quickly ridiculed, with people pointing out that given the NSA’s history of lying, there was no reason to suddenly believe them in this latest episode.



As the rumours refused to die, the Federal Administration was forced to take action. The White House National Security Council Spokesperson Caitlin Hayden followed her NSA counterpart by issuing a statement on behalf of Barack Obama and the American government:

“If the Federal government, including the intelligence community, had discovered this vulnerability prior to last week, it would have been disclosed to the community responsible for OpenSSL”

Although the story fans the flames of anger that many still feel after last year’s NSA spying revelations, it has to be pointed out that the practicalities of using Heartbleed to steal data are not particularly efficient for the agency.

As Wired Magazine points out, the nature of the bug means only 64kb data of system’s memory can be obtained by sending a query, and the data that is returned is entirely random. There is no limit to the number of queries that can be made, but nobody has yet come forward with method that proves the ability to reliably and consistently extract a server’s persistent key by using Heartbleed. Various challenges have started to emerge online to crack the code, with website optimisation company Cloudfare issuing the following statement:

“If it is possible [to retrieve a private key], it is at a minimum very hard. We have reason to believe based on the data structures used by OpenSSL and the modified version of NGINX that we use, that it may in fact be impossible”.

That said, the NSA has held ambitions of cracking SSL to decrypt traffic for a long time. Since British press reported that in late 2013 the NSA and its UK counterpart GCHQ had successful hacked much of the encryption used to protect bank accounts, emails, and online transactions, there has been increasing speculation amongst security experts about whether the agency had finally achieved its goal.

Ultimately no one can be sure of whether the NSA was involved. Given the lack of hard evidence is would be dangerous to suggest that they were definitely aware of Heartbleed, but it could also be argued that there is no smoke without fire. It’s for you to decide.

Do you think the NSA was involved, or are the reports a result of the media taking advantage of the public’s sense of vulnerability? Let us know in the comments below.

Update: Since this article was first written least four people have independently solved Cloudfare’s Heartbleed Challenge. The first to do so was software engineer Fedor Indutny at NCSC-FI, roughly 9 hours after the challenge was first published. Fedor sent 2.5 million requests over the course of the day.


It means website hosts now need start the expensive and time consuming job of revoking their SSL certificates. Failure to do so jeopardises both the site and its users because it means hackers that have the private keys can impersonate servers even if they have already been patched.

By Daniel Price

Cloud Infographic – Computer Virus Facts And Stats

Cloud Infographic – Computer Virus Facts And Stats

With the recent news of Heartbleed affecting millions of websites security, malware is on the minds of tech consumers more than ever. Being informed about this bug is vitally important for anyone with online accounts. In this infographic by toptenreviews, many important statistics are shown such as the infection rate in the top 10 most infected countries and the infection rate of the top 10 least infected countries. In the United States, 30 percent of households are infected by some form of malware, with viruses and Trojans being the most common types.

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Backup Reminder

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Backup Reminder


By David Fletcher

Are you looking to supercharge your Newsletter, Powerpoint presentation, Social media campaign or Website? Our universally recognized tech related comics can help you. Contact us for information on our commercial licensing rates.

Electronic Sports: How To Make A Living Playing In The Cloud

Electronic Sports: How To Make A Living Playing In The Cloud

Electronic Sports: How To Make a Living Playing In the Cloud


We all know that video games can be a great way to relax and unwind after a hard day’s work. Tooling around in a souped-up sports car, dealing death by the bucket load to vicious zombies or just helping your favorite superhero decimate the ranks of the enemy; all of these activities and more can be found in droves when playing different genres of video games.

However, did you know that video gaming in the cloud is now capable of providing you with a way to make good money? Reports state that over 60 different players made an excess of $100,000 in 2013, from prize money alone. Factor in money made from sponsors, as well as streaming practice games through services like Twitch, and you have a standard of living far in excess of what most of us enjoy. In fact, professional video gaming has become so popular, that the U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services has begun issuing visas to players, listing them as professional athletes.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

How To Launch Your Career

So how can you go about getting in on this new and lucrative industry? MLG, which is short for Major League Gaming, is one of the most well-known professional video gaming sites on the internet. Their take on launching your professional video gaming career includes the basics, like sharpening your skills and forming a team. Other advice, such as the need to learn the lingo used in the industry and the helpfulness of watching existing pro players while they play, can also be used to launch a pro video gaming career most effectively.

Current Gaming Events

While cloud gaming is still in its infancy, many different events and tournaments already exist designed specifically with the cloud gamer in mind. In an interview a couple of years back with the CEO of the aforementioned MLG, Sundance DiGiovanni, it was established that it was his belief that its events would evolve and grow wildly over the coming years. This certainly bore itself out to be true, with both prize money and interested viewers grew by an order of magnitude.

MLG is not the only game in town when it comes to professional cloud gaming events. CPL, the Cyberathlete Professional League, hosts events each year, including a world tour that was held in 2005.

Finding Future Events

Not all pro gaming events are as widely known as the two previously mentioned behemoths. Tons of smaller events are held the world over, many with much less stringent qualifications than their larger counterparts. Tournament Seeker provides a database of virtually eery gaming event around the country that you can even search to find events.

Finding a way to combine what you love with a way to earn cash has always been one of the Holy Grail’s of job hunting. No better avenue to satisfy this desire exists in the digital world we live in today than video games. Are you a professional gamer, or do you aspire to become one? Let us know your experience in the Comments Section below!

By Joe Pellicone

CloudTweaks Comics
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