Category Archives: Cloud Computing

The Challenges Of Multi-tenancy

The Challenges Of Multi-tenancy

The Challenges of Multi-tenancy

Regarded as one of the most important features of cloud computing, multi-tenancy is a key common attribute of both public and private spaces. It applies to all three layers of a cloud (IaaS, PaaS and SaaS) and refers to a software architecture design in which a single instance of a software application serves multiple customers.

Multi-tenancy architecture has many benefits over multi-instance architecture. It is often cheaper to run thanks to software development costs and maintenance costs being shared, updates are faster because the provider only has to make the changes once, and it is easily scalable. Nonetheless, challenges of running software for a large number of tenants still presents problems – what are they?



Software providers will naturally argue that their software is protected with the highest level of security available and that a company’s data is more secure than ever on their servers. Nonetheless, there is a scope for human error, where a database administrator accidentally grants access to an unauthorized person or contravenes the security policy of an organisation.

There is also the threat of hackers – no matter how secure an encryption is it can always to broken with the right knowledge. A hacker who breaks the encryption of multitenant database will be able to steal the data of hundreds of businesses who have data stored on it.

Capacity Optimization

Database administrators need the tools and the knowledge to understand which tenant should be deployed on which network in order to maximise capacity and reduce costs. This is process is further complicated by the need to continuously align capacity with business demand and requires providers to manage the actual and forecasted resource utilization for all their servers.

Service Delivery and High Availability

When failures occur or when certain services generate abnormal loads the service delivery can be interrupted – yet business clients will often request high-availability, typically 99.999 percent. Therefore, monitoring the service delivery and its availability is critical to ensure that the service is properly delivered and meeting SLAs. Without effective monitoring problems are hard to locate and downtimes are increased – often leading to lost revenue.



According to Librato CTO and co-founder Joseph Ruscio, “modern IT environments are incredibly dynamic and their operators require sophisticated alerting capabilities”. He believes effective monitoring can be the solution for successfully managing the ever changing IT landscape and thus many of the challenges of multi-tenancy.

Ruscio’s company, the San Francisco-based Librato, offers clients a secure, stable and resistant platform that has been optimised for time series data analytics. It allows users to see all the metrics that are required to track the health of web-scale applications and consequently enables them to quickly find the cause of unexpected patterns and events. Their software accepts both a company’s operational metrics and its other additional metrics by using a REST API, and presents all the information in a web-based application that is highly-detailed and easy-to-use.

Indeed the company has recently launched a brand new alerting platform that they hope provide a framework for industry-leading new features. Amongst other features, users can now be alerted on application-level SLAs, on when a source stops reporting and on when all data-points in a given duration exceed a threshold.

Librato is rapidly becoming one of the ‘must-haves’ of multi-tenant architecture monitoring – a view echoed by Scott Turnquest, application developer at ThoughtWorks. He says, “Librato is one of the most important live dashboards that we have running in our team room. By watching out for particular trends, we’re usually able to be proactive about issues before they affect customers”.

Turnquest’s quote undoubtedly highlights the key reason for using an effective monitoring solution – addressing problems before they reach the customer. It means less downtime, reduced costs, improved client feedback, a better reputation in the market place, and improved business prospects long term. Ultimately, a high quality cloud monitoring tool such as Librato will aid administrators of multi-tenant architecture improve its security, capacity optimisation, service delivery, and high availability by helping them to configure problem detection and to do root-cause analysis. 

What do you think are the challenges of multi-tenant architecture? What about solutions? Do you use an effective monitoring tool? Let us know in the comments below.

By Daniel Price

Post Sponsored By Librato

How Haptic Technology Could Revolutionize The Cloud Gaming Experience

How Haptic Technology Could Revolutionize The Cloud Gaming Experience

How Haptic Technology Could Revolutionize the Cloud Gaming Experience

Haptic Technology

When it comes to picking a word used to describe the pinnacle of the online gaming experience, in this author’s humble opinion, that word would have to be “realistic.” Sure, plenty of other attributes exist that are important to the gaming world in general, and the online gaming world in specific. However, no Holy Grail exists that is more important than finding the most realistic gaming experience imaginable.

This quality is actually more important in cloud gaming situations than what you would find playing a single-player game. Granted, most people who play video games like to experience a realistic environment in the games they play. However, given the fact that much of the efficacy of cloud play is based on how quickly you react to, and interact with, your surroundings, the tiny details found in more realistic games usually give the gamer an edge.

So how do we further increase the realism found in the cloud games we play? Graphics and sound have reached pinnacles unseen in years past, contributing greatly to the level of realism we enjoy. There is, however, one area that has garnered an exceptional amount of buzz from recent innovations that could very well be the answer to the ever-present quest of supreme realism: haptic technology.

What Is Haptic Technology?

Haptic technology is defined as “a tactile feedback technology which takes advantage of the sense of touch by applying forces, vibrations, or motions to the user.” Basically what this means is that using different types of vibrations and motions, haptic technology can mimic one of the areas neglected in most current game hardware: the tactile.

What We Have Today

Haptic technology has actually been around for quite a while, with the first patent based on it being filed in the 1970s. Unfortunately, the tech hardware and software available at the time were in no way sophisticated enough to fully utilize this new innovation. As a result, similarly to what has happened with all types of inventions unsupported by what was currently available, it was shelved.

One of the first popular uses of haptic technology in the gaming industry was the Sony DualShock controller. This controller differed from all other offerings at the time by providing a vibratory feeling whenever predefined actions occurred in the game. Instead of just seeing the gun you are using, now you can feel it buck in your hand in tandem with the shots you fire.

Another exciting product that is just starting to show its face on the mainstream consumer market is the haptic glove. Also know as a wired glove or data glove, haptic gloves take the premise first established by products like the DualShock and enhances it by an order of magnitude. The amount of different ways to customize these gloves, such as the Keyglove, is astounding.

What Is On the Horizon?

If you think the DualShock or the Keyglove are cool, imagine of you had the capacity to feel haptic feedback throughout your entire body? Sound too good to be true? A new Kickstarter project, named the ARAIG, says differently.

The ARAIG, which stands for As Real As It Gets, is a suit that you wear, which contains 48 different haptic feedback sensors placed strategically throughout it. This allows for individual sensations to be felt exactly where they should be. Things like the impact of a bullet, the explosion of a bomb or even pouring rain, can be felt exactly where you would feel it in a real-world scenario.

Given that a split second can turn a killstreak into a fatality, having every possible way to experience things more quickly can only serve to enhance the game you are playing, as well as its playability. Haptic technology can provide this advantage, potentially turning you into the gamer only found in your dreams.

By Joe Pellicone

(Infographic Source:

Challenges Faced By Cloud Security

Challenges Faced By Cloud Security

Challenges Faced By Cloud Security

Cloud Infographic_001

Cloud computing has revolutionized the way businesses manage their data. The amount of data produced by the corporate sector has increased at a rapid rate over the past few years. In order to handle this exponential need for storage space, organizations need a reliable and secure approach with which they can use to optimize their operations, which in turn will reduce costs. Cloud computing provides suitable development environments, rapid resources for operating platforms, application environments and backup and storage of data at low costs. But, some of the factors that make cloud computing such a convenience for managing resources also raise considerable security concerns.

Challenges Faced by Cloud Security

Cloud computing inherits the security issues pertaining in the technologies that it uses, which consists chiefly of the risk of a breach in the integrity or confidentiality of information. One security measure is encrypting stored data, but there are drawbacks with encryption and it does not always protect data. This presents a very challenging situation for cloud security professionals. Seven of these challenges are discussed below:

1) Breach of Trust

In cloud services, it is very important that the service provider has the trust of his customer and he does not exploit this in any way. There is no way to be 100% sure of your cloud service providers being trustworthy. There are certain legal issues entangled with cloud security as well, because there are certain laws that cloud service providers should comply with and these laws vary from country to country. Users have no idea or control over where or in what jurisdiction their data is being physically stored over the cloud.

2) Maintaining Confidentiality

Preventing improper disclosure of information is maintaining confidentiality of data. Service providers have full access to your data, so they have the opportunity to misuse this information. This issue requires proper attention from an information security analyst in order to ensure your data is not being shared without your permission.

3) Preserving Integrity

Integrity is preventing illegal modification of data or its instances. Users with privilege to your data can easily modify it unless it is encrypted. One entity with such privilege is a cloud service provider. Preserving integrity of data over the cloud is a viable challenge to security researchers.

4) Authenticity and Completeness

In a cloud, there may be multiple users with varying levels of access privilege to your data. A user with limited access may have access to a subset of data, but he needs to be assured that this subset is valid and verified. Digital signatures are used for providing a validation, proof of authentication for access to a superset of data. Certain approaches inspired by Merkle trees and signature aggregation are used for digital validation of data. But still there are vulnerabilities for this issue in cloud security.

5) Risk Factors Associated with Virtual Machines

In a typical cloud model application, processes are run from within virtual machines. These virtual machines are on a shared server with other virtual machines running as well, some of which may be malicious. Security researchers have proved that attacks from one virtual machine to another is possible. Therefore, cloud security experts consider this a serious issue.

6) Vulnerabilities from Shared Resources

Cloud data running on multicore processors is vulnerable to application data being compromised, because, as researches have shown, applications can communicate through the cores and may exchange data as well. With the multi tenancy architecture of a cloud server in which many applications are stored on the same server, it is always possible for malicious users to intercept data from the network channel.

7) Issues with Encryption

Although encrypting data seems like the solution for preserving confidentiality, integrity and authenticity on the cloud, this approach does have shortcomings. For one, this is not a cost effective method because to decrypt data, an enormous amount of computational time is added to the processing time. Each time a query runs in the database, both the cost and time increases dramatically, especially if the amount of data is very large. Encryption algorithms are subject to get tracked down as well. Cloud security professionals have the challenge of continuing to reinforce this technique.

Cloud computing can be used for carrying out various IT functions, and providing security to the cloud is not an easy task for cloud security professionals as there are various security concerns.

There are many benefits to cloud computing. Cloud computing provides a viable means for building cost effective solutions which are substantially flexible. By using virtual servers on internet, cloud computing provides easy delivery platforms for serving business and eases out more expensive consumer IT services.

However, there are serious risks of integrity and confidentiality for data shared on a cloud. This is because required services are often outsourced from a third party, which makes it difficult to ensure security and privacy of data.

Security professionals still need to deal with the architectural flaws of the cloud computing model so that cloud computing can be made more reliable and trustworthy.

By Chetan Soni

Mozilla’s Decision To Promote Brendan Eich To CEO Inspires Boycotts

Mozilla’s Decision To Promote Brendan Eich To CEO Inspires Boycotts

Mozilla’s Decision to Promote Brendan Eich to CEO Inspires Boycotts


Mozilla has announced Brendan Eich will take over as the long-term replacement for interim CEO Jay Sullivan, who is leaving to “pursue new opportunities”. Sullivan originally stepped in for former CEO Gary Kovacs, who left in April 2013.

While working for Netscape in 1995, Eich invented JavaScript, which became the most widely used programming language for webpages and internet applications. Eich co-founded the project in 1998 and was promoted to CTO of Mozilla in 2005.

His promotion to CEO has drawn criticism from gay and human rights activists. This is due to controversy that arose in 2012, when it was revealed that Eich donated $1,000 to a campaign supporting Prop 8 in California, a piece of legislation that denied gay and lesbian couples the right to marry.  Prop 8 passed, but was then overturned by a California state court, and this ruling was upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

Many users, now former users, of Mozilla services have begun boycotting their products, including their popular web browser Firefox. Hampton Catlin, who co-founded his company, rarebit, with his husband, wrote an open letter to Mozilla informing them he would no longer develop or test his apps on Firefox.

Box Goes Public with IPO

After over a year of anticipation, sparked by a January 2013 interview with Box’s (formerly 29-year-old CEO Aaron Levie that announced eventual plans to go public, on Monday afternoon Box filed the necessary paperwork with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission that will allow them to sell shares to the general public. Box shares will now be available on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol BOX.

According to their S-1 filing, as of January 31st, 2014, Box has more than 25 million registered users, over 34,000 businesses that pay to use their services and 972 employees. Box noted revenues of $124.2 million in 2013, but also claimed some notable losses of $50.3 million, $112.6 million and $168.6 million in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.

Eight banks, including Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan Chase, worked with Box for this initial offering. This IPO is a dual class offering, meaning shareholders who bought shares after Box went public will receive one vote per share, while company insiders who attained shares before the company went public will receive ten votes per share. Box expects to raise $250 million in its first month on the stock exchange.

By Adam Ritche

Cloud Infographic: Cybercrime Costs Around The World

Cloud Infographic: Cybercrime Costs Around The World

Cloud Infographic: Cybercrime Costs Around The World

Cyber threats, like identity theft, malware and data breaches, are constantly increasing in number and growing in sophistication. The New Face of Cybercrime infographic illustrates various methods to prevent and protect against the cyber threats expected in 2014 and explores the costs incurred by companies around the globe from cyber attacks in 2013.

Provided is an infographic courtesy of the group at HOB.

New Face of Cybercrime Infographic_001

Infographic Source: HOB

Mimicking Your Customers’ Experience

Mimicking Your Customers’ Experience

Mimicking Your Customers’ Experience


One of the more dramatic and visible aspects of computing in the age of the cloud is the “attack.” Banks, governments, retailers and other high-profile organizations are hit regularly, in many cases daily, by hackers seeking either to steal data, as happened to Target and Tesco very recently, or to sabotage a site, as best illustrated by the Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks experienced by NATO and the freelancing website just this week. Hacker attacks serve as a wakeup call to companies of any size, reminding IT managers and executives of the risks involved in doing business on a globally connected network.

For IT companies, another wake-up call comes from these stories: no matter which letter precedes their “aaS” moniker, as in SaaS, PaaS, DaaS, IaaS or even ITMaas, customers need to feel that they and their industry are understood. Take website design, for example. Websites have grown in sophistication and complexity in the two decades since CERN revealed the very first one  in 1995, but very often the designers of these sites forget the end user experience in favor of a sleek look and feel. Complicated forms, for example as might be offered by a mass transit company, incorporate data from Google Earth into a their own scheduling software in order to assist patrons in choosing the correct bus or train route. But if these forms do not work correctly on a particular device, an iPad or smartphone, for example, then the functionality and convenience is lost. Website designers worth their salt will incorporate a cast of “user profiles” in designing a site, including the student, the grandma, the busy executive, the newly arrived immigrant – all with a different approach to using technology, and with different challenges in understanding commands and procedures for using the site. They will also factor in the variety of user platforms, from old PCs through to the newest phones. Such awareness of a customer’s experience is crucial during both the design and testing phase and can make the difference between success and failure.

Eric Anderson CTO and co-founder of Austin, TX-based CopperEgg, agrees. “A company website represents a crucial element of its presence and transaction capability,” he states. “If the site fails to load in time, customers leave quickly. It’s all about seconds.” Anderson points out that every time a large-scale retail system such as takes more than five seconds to load, thousands of dollars in revenue are lost as customers quickly move elsewhere.

His company addresses these types of issues through monitoring and optimization solutions that constantly analyze traffic and potential data problems so as to alert IT managers and the systems themselves as to possible overload or breakdown situations.

Anderson is careful to reinforce that the type of analysis and monitoring that his company provides is not intended to only be purely procedural for the IT managers – it is intended to ensure that the end user experience is continually positive and satisfactory. He cautions his clients to take the time to truly observe a website or online service from the standpoint of a customer or end user. “You have to mimic the customer experience,” he says, and that is sometimes difficult for experienced, high-functioning IT specialists. “Remember the cup holder,” he states, referring to the age-old computer help-desk joke about a customer who mistook his DVD slide out tray for a coffee-cup holder. Customers do not generally know as much as programmers do, and it is not the customer’s obligation to get caught up. It is up to us as IT specialists to know what they know and what they don’t and to build that in to the functionality, both on the surface, as well as underneath.

As the SaaS industry grows in response to the increased use of the cloud, Anderson cautions that the final letter in that acronym is “service,” which refers to the human beings staring at the screen and not the software itself. Niche services such as those provided by CopperEgg must constantly reinforce the customer experience by truly knowing it: “You need monitoring at the granularity your customers care about. And that’s seconds, not minutes.”

CopperEgg offers a free trial of their monitoring and optimization solutions here.

By Steve Prentice

Post Sponsored By CopperEgg

Augmented Reality And Cloud Gaming

Augmented Reality And Cloud Gaming

Augmented Reality and Cloud Gaming: A Melding of the Virtual and Real Worlds 


Imagine, if you will, living in a world that is hotly contested by two different factions, each vying for absolute dominance of both land and people. You find yourself standing on your local street corner, with the burning knowledge that you must find the portals that connect your world together and hack them for your faction.

Sounds like something straight out of a science fiction movie, right? Well it isn’t. Enter Ingress.

Ingress is a game developed and produced by Google and is one of the most successful ventures into the world of augmented-reality gaming to date. Gameplay consists of locating and “hacking” different portals around the globe, in order to solidify your faction’s hold on the general populace. Rewards, such as the exotic material called XM, which is needed to keep you healthy and energized, can be found along the way as gameplay progresses

Ingress is just one of the examples of how augmented reality is poised to revolutionize gaming in general, and cloud gaming in specific. Why is this the case? The answer is easy: realism. While running around virtual worlds battling minions from all corners of the globe is fun, traditional cloud gaming still consists primarily of computer-generated imagery. While this is acceptable for many settings and applications, it does not hold a candle to being able to experience the real world in tandem with the game you are playing.

Google Glass

As of right now, the only way to enjoy this type of entertainment is on the screen of a smartphone or tablet. While these applications are cutting edge by today’s standards, having to look at a screen, as opposed to the world itself, makes any advantages in realism virtually nullified. So how can we circumvent this obstacle? The answer lies in one of the most anticipated pieces of hardware in recent memory: Google Glass.

Instead of being forced to consul you tech device’s screen while playing your cloud-based game, Google Glass puts everything right in front of your eyes. This allows you to act like you normally would traversing the world, with images and data being beamed directly onto a lens poised right in front of your eye. As you can probably imagine, this adds a degree of realism and immersion that cannot be contested by even the most powerful gaming rigs or consoles.

Where Do We Go From Here?

Ingress and Google Glass are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to augmented reality and gaming. For example, depth-sensing cameras are expected to hit mobile devices as early as this year. These cameras, in tandem with increasingly-sophisticated software, have the capacity to incorporate even more real-world data, further increasing the level of realism by a long way.


While we are in no way capable of mimicking many of the augmented-reality scenarios hat you see in many of the more popular science fiction movies as of yet, that future is eminently possible and could very well arrive sometime in this decade. If you are a gamer who enjoys cloud gaming, expect to have your mind blown with what we have coming on the horizon.

By Joe Pellicone

10 Innovative Cloud-Based Start-ups

10 Innovative Cloud-Based Start-ups

10 Innovative Cloud-Based Start-ups

The growth of cloud computing over the last five years has seen a rapid increase in the number of start-up companies in the sector. Many of these start-ups are doing unique things that are changing the landscape of the cloud industry itself and establishing themselves as new market leaders in the process.

The list of interesting companies is endless, but here we take a look at ten which grabbed our attention…


1. SkyKick

The launch of Microsoft’s Office 365 heralded a new era for the ubiquitous productivity suite, as the company unified its various apps into an always-up-to-date cloud service – but migration to the system could be tedious and problematic. SkyKick was launched in 2013 with the aim of helping SMEs quickly move from legacy systems to Office 365. The app can migrate everything from the legacy email system and architecture to the data and settings.

2. VigyanLabs

VigyanLabs is an Indian start-up that was founded in 2010 by a team of specialists in high-performance computing. The company provide solutions aimed at reducing the massive power consumption of global data centres. By using intelligent power management VigyanLabs can now reduce usage by up to 40 percent.

3. Nebula

With the aim of accommodating the physical scale of big data and web and mobile applications, Nebula has developed a cloud computing hardware appliance that can turn customers’ racks of standard servers into a private cloud. Built on OpenStack framework, the open source architecture is designed to help prevent vendor lock-in.

4. Piston OpenStack

After being founded in 2011, Piston OpenStack has received funding from industry leaders such as CISCO Systems and Swisscom Ventures to help develop their private cloud operating system. The system is highly scalable and focuses on ease of use and advanced security features for highly regulated environments.

5. AtomOrbit

AtomOrbit is an innovator BYOD solutions. Their flagship software – TeamFusion – has been designed around Microsoft SharePoint and provides an agnostic feature-rich user experience on a device of any size. The HTML5 web-app pulls SharePoint data like announcements, lists, calendars, blogs and events and presents it on a single dashboard.

6. CloudVelocity

CloudVelocity offers the only fully automated solution for deploying Windows and Linux multi-tier apps and services into the cloud without the need for modification or virtualization. After being founded in late 2012 the company have already raised more than $18 million in Series A and B funding.

7. Classle

Classle is an entirely cloud-based education provider. The company was founded with the idea of providing post-secondary education to people living in rural areas of third-world countries. Built using open source technologies, students can access content, attend live online classes, review audio and video recordings, ask questions and consult experts on topics they choose.

8. Codename One

Since launching in 2012, Codename One already powers 25 million devices. Operating in the rapid application development market, the platform allows developers make their apps work across iOS, Android, Windows, and RIM while only having to write the code once using Java.

9. Revolve Robotics

Working in the cloud-based teleconferencing industry, Revolve Robotics enables users to look around the room they are conferencing with, including on the opposite side of the connection. The web app allows users to design their own meeting room including personalised saved positions and titles for each team member. The camera can be controlled through any web-capable device.

10. Airpost

With the increase of BYOD it is becoming ever more important for companies to effectively monitor the various security levels of the multitude of apps being used. Airpost allows IT administrators understand all the cloud services being used in their organisation and implement advanced controls to manage and enforce security policies.

What do you are think are some of the most interesting start-ups in the cloud-based sector? Have we missed off your favourite? Let us know in the comments below.

By Daniel Price

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

CloudTweaks Comics
Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

The Digital Twin  How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future. In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Hybrid Cloud Environments After several years of steady cloud adoption in the enterprise, an interesting trend has emerged: More companies are retaining their existing, on-premise IT infrastructures while also embracing the latest cloud technologies. In fact, IDC predicts markets for such hybrid cloud environments will grow from the over $25 billion global market we saw…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

What You Need To Know About Choosing A Cloud Service Provider

What You Need To Know About Choosing A Cloud Service Provider

Selecting The Right Cloud Services Provider How to find the right partner for cloud adoption on an enterprise scale The cloud is capable of delivering many benefits, enabling greater collaboration, business agility, and speed to market. Cloud adoption in the enterprise has been growing fast. Worldwide spending on public cloud services will grow at a…

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

Ensure Your Cloud Is Always Operational We have become so accustomed to being online that we take for granted the technological advances that enable us to have instant access to everything and anything on the internet, wherever we are. In fact, it would likely be a little disconcerting if we really mapped out all that…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…


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