Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Economic Arguments For Cloud-Based ERP

Economic Arguments For Cloud-Based ERP

Cloud-Based ERP

If your business has reached the point where an ERP system is necessary and it’s time to decide which type of implementation is best for your business, there are a lot of factors to consider before taking the plunge. The two main discrete options for an ERP implementation are either an on-premise or cloud-based solution. On-premise solutions are privately hosted on your own local servers and network and managed by your internal IT resources.

Cloud-based ERPs are hosted online and the data, security, and infrastructure are all managed off-site and the system can be accessed from any location with internet access. Between uptime, security, accessibility, standardization, customization, and updates, both options have their benefits and drawbacks. But when it comes to cost, cloud-based ERP systems can have quite the advantage over on-premise solutions. Let’s take a look.

Lower Cost of Ownership

An on-premise solution has many costs associated with it that are at least partially absorbed by a cloud solution. On-premise ERP systems often require a large up-front purchase, the time and focus of IT staff, the cost of hardware, customization, training, maintenance, security, upgrades, and the general overhead to keep the lights on and your system running. Cloud ERP systems, on the other hand, are priced on a monthly or annual subscription that can take the pain out of the initial costs of implementation. This leaves a business with the freedom to cancel or choose a different level of service if necessary.

cloud erp strategy

No Cost to Upgrade

Upgrades and patches, in general, can be costly and time-consuming. Where a cloud-based system comes with automatic updates, an on-premise system will require you to allocate the time of your IT staff to deploy the update in-house. A cloud-based ERP system provides you with the ability to redirect staff to focus on areas that bring the most value to your business.

Because these updates are online and automatic, and you are effectively subscribing to an ERP service versus purchasing the system up-front, you are not responsible for the cost of upgrades. Where upgrading an on-premise solution may require scheduling to meet budgetary needs and therefore leave valuable features waiting on the table that could benefit your business, a cloud solution offers these at the moment they are available, automatically and free of charge. This results in greater system stability and better opportunities to grow your business.

No Software, Security, or Hardware Maintenance Costs

When it comes to your business, security is paramount. With an on-premise solution, data is the responsibility of the organization. And it can be costly to maintain cutting-edge electronic and physical security layers.

In addition to security costs, an on-premise solution carries with it the cost of hiring an installation expert and purchasing enterprise-grade servers, operating systems, databases, and backup systems to support those servers. A cloud-based solution takes on these responsibilities and leaves your business more secure and less liable for the financial burden of additional maintenance and infrastructure requirements. A hosted solution also combines many of these costs at a lower overall rate. Most notably, cloud ERP provides your business with the ability to only pay for only what you need, whether it be number of users or amount of digital storage space.

Response to Business Needs

A cloud-based ERP system allows members of a business to communicate information in real-time, all the time. This improves collaboration and allows your business to adapt to any number of situations.

The standardization of a cloud-based ERP system means a reduction in time spent reconciling data, converting information, and bridging gaps between different systems at different locations. Whether it be customer questions or concerns, a need to adjust a line of supply to meet demand, vendor issues, or any other everyday requirement, a cloud-based ERP system can help provide clear, accessible, continuous communication.

Faster to Deploy Means Improved Time to Value

With an out-of-the-box solution, your business will spend less time on selecting the appropriate hardware, negotiating IT capacity, deploying software, training employees, and making the back-end adjustments and customizations necessary to ensure your solution is up to snuff and ready for business. A cloud-based ERP system means you’re up and running in no time, which reduces the often prohibitive costs of ERP implementation that can leave businesses pushing back their purchase and losing out on improved efficiency across all departments.

Guaranteed Uptime


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Anyone who has had their servers go down knows that it can lead to a significant financial hit. On-premise solutions leave the business in charge of ensuring uptime and keeping IT staff on call in case of emergency. In addition, network and system downtime can cost a business much more than simple dollars per hour. It can also impact the reputation of a business, and leave doubt in the minds of consumers as to whether the company they are investing their time and money in is dedicated to running a reliable business. With around the clock technical support, cloud-hosted solutions mean no scrambling to find someone who is still in the office to handle a system issue, and no expenses for additional IT and other employee hours or replacement of hardware or software infrastructure.

The crucial decision in choosing the best ERP for your business should not come lightly. Managing your ERP on-site versus opting for a cloud-based solution brings with it many separate decisions. But when it comes to comparing the costs of each implementation, one can find a great deal of financial value associated with a cloud-based ERP deployment. These include faster time to value, low cost of ownership, quick and painless upgrades, and a lack of hardware, security, IT support, and maintenance costs. All of these benefits can help you and your employees focus on the big-picture initiatives that keep your business moving forward.

By Aaron Continelli

Big Data Solutions For The Gaming Industry

Big Data Solutions For The Gaming Industry

Big Data, The Cloud and Gaming

Big Data plays a major role in gaming, an industry valued at over $90 billion today. With the gaming industry more competitive than ever, developers are trying to understand player psychology and behavior to ensure games are constructed in such a way that players find their “flow zone.” Ensuring gamers keep coming back through game optimization, refining factors which encourage titles going viral, and additionally monetizing games through in-game purchasing is a blueprint to a gaming business’s success.

Big Data Analytics for Gaming

Every player interaction, mouse click, and keyboard press creates valuable data in game logs. However, if you’ve ever opened a game log, you’ll wonder how on earth you’re supposed to find it. This is where Big Data analytics steps up to the plate. Aggregated and analyzed, game logs explain what engages players and what encourages them to return. With the added social media and web access integrated, player profiles can be further developed, allowing gaming companies to provide personalized experiences and drive game attraction.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Through combined user behavior and demographic information, merged with brands regularly engaged with, it’s possible to understand preferences and create specifically targeted digital ads, improve user experience, and identify VIPs. Analyzing combined logs and player data also enables the identification of common characteristics, helping recognize what drives particular gaming segments to play, and play longer. This has the added benefit of enabling gaming businesses to target new users most likely to engage with their titles. Finally, testing and analyzing results ensure constant gaming development and tweaking, based on real player data feedback.

Big Data Solutions for the Gaming Industry

No longer a market only for the giants, thousands of smaller game designers and developers are creating successful products for both traditional and emerging platforms, such as social media or mobile devices. With some estimates suggesting approximately two billion video game players worldwide, Big Data services are more relevant than ever, but the nearly unlimited data collected poses its own problem. Sources include gameplay data, social media, micro-transactions, price points, in-game advertising, payment systems, virtual goods, real-time events, multiplayer interactions, and content updates, and developers run the risk of recording data merely because it might, at some time, become relevant. Suitable Big Data solutions are shifting the focus to the right data for generation of actionable insights.

Cloud-Based Architecture

Uniquely able to address many technical challenges of the gaming industry, cloud-based architecture can provide scalable data storage solutions as well as the essential real-time availability. With billions of records streamed and immediately analyzed, cost-effective and low CAPEX cloud solutions are attractive. For the small gaming providers, analytics and storage vendors are offering tailored cloud solutions that provide the necessary speed, scale, cost, and capacity through fully managed, cloud-based Analytics as a Service platforms. With their near real-time analytics of current and historical data, smaller gaming companies are able to compete with the likes of Sony and Microsoft through these innovative and cost-effective Big Data analysis platforms.

Swiftly adopting Big Data technologies, the gaming industry is refining customer engagement, optimizing game development and end-user experiencing, and creating more effective targeted and personalized advertising. The blending of cloud-based tools offers further advancement as complicated and expensive infrastructures are outsourced to cloud service providers who manage the IT staffing and maintenance necessary to these platforms. High performing, scalable, service-based analytics cloud solutions mean game developers can focus on what they do best, leaving the Big Data analysis to experts and directly embedding the insights gleaned into gaming projects for improved traction, larger market engagement, and greater business success.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach

For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy. Are they trying to say the perimeter is changing, or that the perimeter no longer exists?

In the context of the devices that allow humans to look at data, that perimeter is changing dramatically. From the workstations and laptops, to handheld computing devices, trying to define a security perimeter in this perspective can be challenging. Mobility has changed the client-side perimeter overnight. However, does the concept of mobility mean that perimeters can no longer exist?

Regardless of where data resides, anytime data is accessed, it is done through a perimeter. The world has benefited from wireless technologies that enabled mobility for years. But is there such a thing as the “virtual wire”? Anytime data enters a server, or is uploaded to or downloaded from a server, it will eventually traverse a piece of wire. That wire may be made of copper, or that wire may be made of fiber optics. Either way it’s still a piece of wire where both good guys and bad guys access data. That piece of wire needs to be protected at all costs.

Hackers today are after the data

The most secure method of protecting data on a server is to remove the wire that allows clients to access it. However, we all know what happens when you remove the wire. Short of that, how does one go about protecting that piece of wire? It all begins with a comprehensive, in-depth defense approach. Hackers today are after the data and will go to almost any length to get it. That piece of wire is where most attackers break in.

data breach

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Years ago, organizations realized that their firewalls were nothing more than speed bumps to the seasoned hacker. Organizations began deploying end-point protection, intrusion detection systems, intrusion preventions systems, web applications firewalls, sandboxes, and the list goes on and on; all in an attempt to protect that piece of wire, and the data that traverses it. One of the main impediments to deploying these point solutions (often manufactured by different vendors) is their failure to interoperate. No single vendor had a complete, end-to-end solution.

Today, organizations understand the evolutionary dilemma of deploying disparate technologies. Instead, most organizations desire an ecosystem of solutions and technologies that interoperate, are fully aware of each other, communicate with each other, and defend that piece of wire to the fullest. They’re looking for a one-stop-shop that can completely defend the perimeters that still exist, and it all begins with the fully aware, hybrid-cloud approach as shown in the picture below.


On the far left, both good (green) and malicious (red) clients are shown. On the far right shows a perimeter that exists when accessing data within a datacenter (or even within a cloud). What you put in between those two entities makes all the difference in the world.

As shown above, attackers erode your defenses, consume your resources, control your systems, and steal your data. In addition, attackers use a host of different attacks shown in red to achieve their goals.

How does one manage the risks while blocking the threats?

In the fully aware, hybrid-cloud approach, the first line of defense begins with Cloud DDoS Defenses as shown on the bottom left. These defenses ensure that your organization is never taken offline due to a large, volumetric DDoS attack. But more importantly, they play a vital role ensuring all other defenses are not affected by a DDoS attack. All types of flooding attacks are simply eliminated by the Cloud DDoS Defenses.

On-Premises DDoS Defenses is the second line of defense. These defenses are deployed to ensure that low and slow, short-duration, and/or partial saturation attacks never consume your resources – including your security team. On-Premises DDoS Defenses must work in concert with the Cloud DDoS Defenses, ensuring that all unwanted denial of service (and other traffic types) are dropped with no further downstream inspection.

The third line of defense includes Next-Gen IPS with Sandbox. These systems are designed to eliminate malware intended to compromise and control your devices. These defenses look deep inside payloads to determine the intent of the traffic that makes it through the Cloud and On-Premises Defenses. Known malware is eliminated by the IPS. Unknown malware is eliminated by the Sandbox. Working in concert, both known and unknown malware, which are the sources of many advanced persistent threat attacks, are eliminated.

Web Application Firewalls (WAF) are the final line of perimeter defense. WAFs ensure that all client traffic behaviors when accessing data, align with corporate security policies. Data is given the utmost protection. WAFs provide complete defense for the OWASP Top Ten vulnerabilities, regardless of clear-text or encrypted traffic streams, and are deployed as close to the data as possible.

One may ask where the traditional firewall falls into all of this? The defense layers described above are designed to augment your existing firewall and provide protection for threats that the firewall is not able to prevent. Simply put, the firewall is able to block unwanted TCP and UDP ports but is not capable of preventing modern advanced threats.

The hybrid-cloud approach to security is very effective. However, the best protection is provided by a defense-in-depth architecture incorporating the four lines of defense covered above. The real power of this approach is realized if the architecture also uses closed-loop threat intelligence, whereby all four lines of defense not only collect attack data, but also share that data across all defenses. In this way, all four enforcement layers have the latest information about the complete threat landscape to reduce the overall security risk for any organization.

By Stephen Gates, Chief Research Analyst, NSFOCUS

CompTIA Certifications Fare Well in New IT Skills and Salary Report

CompTIA Certifications Fare Well in New IT Skills and Salary Report

New IT Skills and Salary Report

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill., July 5, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/— Skills certifications from CompTIA, the nonprofit association for the technology industry, are the most popular credentials among information technology (IT) professionals, according to a recent survey on tech skills and salaries.

The 2016 IT Skills and Salary Report published by Global Knowledge, a leading professional development and IT training provider, found that 35 percent of certified IT professionals reported holding one or more CompTIA certifications. That made CompTIA the certification provider mentioned most frequently by respondents in the comprehensive annual report.

The study found that 25 percent of respondents are CompTIA A+ certified; 20 percent hold a CompTIA Network+ certification; and 17 percent are CompTIA Security+ certified.

IT professionals with CompTIA certifications have an average annual salary of $76,575, according to the study. Holders of CompTIA specialty and mastery certifications have even higher average salaries. For CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner certified individuals, the average salary is $90,579. Holders of the CompTIA Cloud Essentials credential earn, on average,$102,568 per year.

The Global Knowledge study affirms what we are seeing in the marketplace,” said Dr. James Stanger, senior director, products, CompTIA. “Security, the cloud, the advent of mobile devices and the Internet of Things are all major drivers of change.”

“With these changes IT professionals are constantly having to re-invent themselves and certification is a big part of that,” Stanger continued. “Certification is a proven and reliable way for an IT pro to demonstrate that they understand underlying technologies and, more importantly, know how to apply the best solution in any circumstance.”

With more than two million certifications awarded, CompTIA is the leading provider of vendor-neutral skills certifications and education for the world’s IT workforce. CompTIA has four IT certification categories that test different knowledge standards, from entry-level to expert, in cloud computing, mobility, Linux, networking, security, storage, help desk and support, servers, project management and other mission-critical technologies. Visit to learn more.

About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a non-profit trade association serving as the voice of the information technology industry. With approximately 2,000 member companies, 3,000 academic and training partners, 80,000 registered users and more than two million IT certifications issued, CompTIA is dedicated to advancing industry growth through educational programs, market research, networking events, professional certifications and public policy advocacy.

Cloud Computing Transforming The Financial Landscape

Cloud Computing Transforming The Financial Landscape

The Financial Landscape

Cloud computing is slowly infiltrating the financial industry, and though some of the more cutting-edge institutions have already adopted a few FinTech advances, the modernisations in store for the sector are far greater. Shrouded in conservative and outmoded practices, banks could do with a kick in the pants, and see just what technology could be doing for them. Progressive startups and financial entrepreneurs are already leading the way, and the results are good.

Who’s Leading Fintech Adoption?


Top Fintech investors include some of the traditional financial institutions we’ve known for decades. JP Morgan Chase & Co.’s Center for Financial Services Innovation is a $30 million initiative that supports FinTech startups, and Goldman Sachs has invested $50 million in Circle Internet Financial, as well as being the first of the banking giants to invest in crypto-current. Barclays has a $150 million investment fund with an accelerator program managed by Techstars and has created its own platform allowing access to innovative digital products.

Of course, global enterprises have recognized the possibilities inherent in FinTech, and non-financial sector organizations participating include IBM, Microsoft, Accenture, Cisco, Thomson Reuters, and many others. The United States boasts the highest FinTech investments, at $10 billion, followed distantly by the UK and Ireland, Nordic countries and the Netherlands. Finance and lending tend to lead the FinTech investment categories, with payment processing, mobile wallets, security and authentication, and remittance following. Banks and mobile banking, however, accounted for just 4% of the FinTech investment in previous years.

The Successful Startups

Thanks in part to a few innovative and emboldening incubators, FinTech startups are making swift progress. The banks are encouraging the categories of big data and analytics, lending, payments, money transfer, and cryptocurrency, and trends support this move. At the top of the FinTech movement, startups are focusing on data analysis for better decision making, payments and international transfers, lending, small business financial solutions, and Bitcoin. But private organizations aren’t alone in their support of FinTech startups; governments are getting involved too. In the United Kingdon, particular tax incentives and other benefits are allocated specifically to startups, and £860 million has been assigned to the National Cyber Security Program, which helps protect and promote the UK and its online businesses. In the U.S. investment in accelerators and incubators has tripled.

Transforming Banking

chris-skinnerLast year, in the report Invigorating Banking carried out by Finextra Research, 83% of respondents suggested their bank’s existing core technology could not support its needs. Says Chris Skinner, report contributor and independent financial consultant, “You cannot become a digital bank without core systems renewal; you cannot renew core systems without using cloud for data management; you need to consolidate data in the cloud to be able to perform effective data analytics; and when you’ve renewed core systems through the cloud to perform data analytics, then you can innovate.

The emergence of blockchain and bitcoin is significant. In 2015, distributed ledger technology blockchain held much interest, and with expanding adoption in 2016 banks are investigating how to use blockchain applications within their systems. The internet of things also holds great promise for our financial sector with sensors monitoring activity helping inform both investment and lending decisions, and some banks are testing their own wearable apps for use on smartphones and smartwatches. Though consumer interest in such applications is high, they are still limited by the current digital strategies of banks, and only a small percentage of banks are actually rolling out their own applications.

Tentatively sticking a toe in the water, banking institutions still have a way to go implementing cloud technology into their systems and applications. Nonetheless, the financial sector as a whole is being propelled forward by innovative tech instruments and services.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Cyber-attacks Means It’s Now Time To Up Your Security

Cyber-attacks Means It’s Now Time To Up Your Security

Time To Up Your Security

The internet has well and truly revolutionised modern life and while it’s brought with it many positives such as a surge in IT-related jobs and improved communication, it’s also caused a considerable amount of security issues that simply didn’t exist a decade ago.

Viruses, bots, hackers and scammers are constantly poised to carry out malicious online activities – hence why web hosts and bare metal servers from 100TB constantly focus on increasing securing – meaning we can never take our eyes off the ball.

Decline in cyber-attacks: A false security


It was recently reported, for instance, that there has been a sudden drop in cyber-attacks on banks with Lloyds Banking Group reporting 80-90 per cent less incidents of late. While this might seem like reassuring news on the surface, it’s believed that the implementation of extra security layers taken by banks has forced cyber criminals to look elsewhere – encouraging them to attack smaller industries with less protection.

The telecommunications industry is believed to be particularly vulnerable with Britain’s TalkTalk Telecom Group recently becoming the victims of an attack which not only cost them 80 million pounds but thousands of customers too. With data stolen from around 157,000 people, bad publicity and rival companies such as Sky and BT waiting to pounce, the end of 2015 was a bad time for TalkTalk all due to malicious online activities – but they’re not the only company to have experience such bad luck.

UK businesses a target for Cyber attacks

According to government research two-thirds of big UK businesses have been hit by cyber-attacks with most of the attacks involving spyware, viruses or malware. A quarter of the firms experiencing a security breach did so at least once a month too, indicating how the problem is not only present but persistent and a very immediate reminder that security is of paramount importance.

Increasing security is the only way forward

Government statistics also revealed that seven out of ten cyber-attacks could have been prevented adding that only a fifth of businesses understand the dangers of sharing information with third parties. At a time when criminals are moving away from bank attacks and looking for weaknesses in other organisations, now is a crucial time to ensure your IT infrastructure is as secure as possible. This might mean installing firewalls and making backups, or it could mean making sure your entire disaster recovery plan is up-to-date – just in case.

Attacks take place every single day and while some industries are being spared by professional online criminals, others are taking the brunt so you must make sure that you take no risks and implement as many security strategies as possible. It’s also a good idea to keep up with the news and make yourself aware of any new viruses that are causing mayhem within the professional world as the more clued up you are, the better prepared you can be.

By Glenn Blake

Want To Save The Planet And Be Green? Then Go Cloud!

Want To Save The Planet And Be Green? Then Go Cloud!

Going Green

Data Centers (DC’s) – they are hungry beasts. Ten years ago the EPA estimated that DC’s consumed 61 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in the US. Just three years ago the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) was calling the consumption level at 91 billion kilowatt-hours – almost a 50% increase in six years. Let’s put this into perspective. That power consumption is enough to power all the households of New York City twice over. Think of it, in 2013 this represented about 2%+ of all the power produced in the United States.

The prognosis was even worse. The NRDC projected that data centers were going to consume 140 billion kilowatt-hours by 2020, another 50%+ increase. But happily a just published new report by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that data center power consumption has essentially plateaued and will grow only slowly despite a huge increase in the number and size of data centers and a 40% increase in the number of servers from 2010 to 2020.

Good news but what happened? The Berkeley Lab discovered that around 2010 DC energy consumption flattened out at 2% of the total US consumption. (Overall energy consumption in the US has also roughly plateaued since 2010.) How can that be when we know that data center building is going gangbusters?


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The key is that data centers for cloud providers (called hyperscale or web scale) are much more efficient than the legacy enterprise data centers. The Facebook’s, Google’s and Amazon’s of the world run tight ships. As well they would, since power and cooling in an old-school enterprise data center can constitute up to 24% of the annual budget.

A number called the PUE or power usage effectiveness measures data center power efficiency. A PUE of 1.0 is considered very desirable while those of 2.0 or 3.0 are very inefficient. Google publishes its PUE at 1.12 and Facebook has said that one of its centers has a PUE of 1.07. The federal government would like to get to 1.5. Being clever about how you design, operate and cool the machines is how you achieve this kind of efficiency.

Definitely this is goodness and points to how adopting cloud supports a green policy and objective. Unfortunately, there are still a lot of legacy data centers. The Berkeley Lab study points to over 60% of data center power consumption coming from smaller facilities. A recent IDC report shows that more than two-thirds of the traditional enterprises it surveyed logged a PUE of more than 2.0, and 10 percent were over 3.0 or didn’t know.

Cloud services are increasingly being adopted and replacing the old on-premise paradigm. The initial effects of this are being seen in the positive move to energy conservation in IT and so far we have good projections of limited power consumption growth for the next several years. That’s certainly good news but consider how much better it might be if the shift to cloud was faster?

By John Pientka

On Demand With The Gig Economy

On Demand With The Gig Economy

The Gig Economy

By now, you’ve probably heard the phrase Gig Economy or seen services offered as “on-demand”. If you’re like 90 million Americans, then you’ve participated in this freelance workforce revolution as either a client or provider.

The rise of apps connecting professional services, goods, and lodging directly to consumers via their smartphone is exploding. Companies like Uber valued at $60 Billion is now officially the fastest growing start up ever, and it is changing the way people get around. AirBnB is changing the way we look for lodging and travel. Gig companies like Postmates aim to bring you anything, from any store, to your door, in under an hour. From moving services, to odd jobs, to dog walking, the possibilities are endless in the new Gig Economy.


(Infographic source:

It is no question this business model will continue to grow, but who are the real winners and losers of this workforce revolution? Workers gain the freedom of breaking out of the 9-5 (priceless to millennials), but lose the stability, health benefits, and safety net of full time employment. Companies cut costs in office space, training, insurance, but lose control over the productivity they can get from their workforce. While 71% of Gig Economy workers reported being satisfied with their work, 58% complained about the lack of regulation in the industry. As recent cases against Uber and AirBnB suggest, we are still in the Wild West when it comes to understanding and regulating these business models, and in the meantime these companies are walking away with massive sums of cash for simply being the middle-man. Some on-demand services are even shifting back to a traditional employment model. Despite who’s winning and losing, in a world of “I want it right now”, the Gig Economy is here to stay.

By Thomas Dougherty

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

IoT Device Failures I have, over the past three years, posted a number of Internet of Things (and the broader NIST-defined Cyber Physical Systems) conversations and topics. I have talked about drones, wearables and many other aspects of the Internet of Things. One of the integration problems has been the number of protocols the various…

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence Supports Better Business Performance

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence Supports Better Business Performance

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence All businesses need a strategy and processes for governance, risk and compliance (GRC). Many still view GRC activity as a burdensome ‘must-do,’ approaching it reactively and managing it with non-specialized tools. GRC is a necessary business endeavor but it can be elevated from a cost drain to a value-add activity. By integrating…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Security: Avoiding A Hatton Garden-Style Data Center Heist

Security: Avoiding A Hatton Garden-Style Data Center Heist

Data Center Protection In April 2015, one of the world’s biggest jewelry heists occurred at the Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Company in London. Posing as workmen, the criminals entered the building through a lift shaft and cut through a 50cm-thick concrete wall with an industrial power drill. Once inside, the criminals had free and unlimited…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…


Sponsored Partners