Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Cloud Infographic: Top 10 Outages In 2013

Cloud Infographic: Top 10 Outages In 2013

Cloud Infographic: Top 10 Outages In 2013

Network downtime is problematic in any company’s existence, costing, in some cases, millions of dollars per day. For this reason, network components and infrastructure equipment are all designed to work seamlessly through upgrades, swap-outs, and even failures, to reduce some of the major causes of downtime.

One serious factor, though, remains an unaddressed challenge: human error. As enterprise networks grow in complexity and size, the likelihood of an honest mistake or oversight causing unforeseen problems grows along with them. Download this complimentary white paper and you’ll discover the benefits of:

  • Proactive vs. reactive troubleshooting
  • Script automation for network commands
  • Continuous systems for greater stability
  • Modular architectures for safe and scalable operations

Download this free white paper here

While the past 12 months saw several noteworthy outages, those at the top tipped the scale with the overall impact their downtime caused – in lost revenue, expansive reach and damaged reputations. This new infographic from Neverfail highlights the top 10 outages of 2013 and analyzes their effects on the reputation and bottom line of each company.


By Water Bailey

Can Cloud Computing Effectively Help Prevent Cybercrime?

Can Cloud Computing Effectively Help Prevent Cybercrime?

Can Cloud Computing Effectively Help Prevent Cybercrime?


We stand on the edge of the digital age, where technology moves quickly, and our lives have been transformed by modern computing. Digitization has resulted in a staggering amount of information flowing through cyberspace. Processing that data has led to a revolution in how we store and access information.

The idea of the cloud is nothing new. Considered as far back as the 1960s, it was the principle on which the internet was developed. The term “cloud” was coined in the 1990s with the advent of virtual private networks.

Initially used for simplifying business processes, the application of cloud computing quickly gained popularity among scientific and gaming communities as well.

Today the cloud has transcended some of its earlier models and is now widely accepted as a secure means of data storage and shared processing power. Its application in science is vastly accelerating research and has been used with particular success in astronomy.

Despite this, online security remains a hot topic and the internet presents ongoing security concerns. The UK government has stated that cybercrime is a bigger threat than nuclear weapons, with an estimated £27 billion cost a year.

Cybercrime is often the result of poor security protocols and unaffordable IT support for many businesses and individuals. Weak wireless passwords and unencrypted, solid-state storage are often cited as the biggest threats to online security. The advancement of cloud computing offers a reliable solution to these vulnerabilities.

Clouds are not single point servers. They rely on a network of encrypted servers configured to spread information across a wide area. With larger companies and professional web-networks such as Google and Cisco, this methodology ensures a strong architecture and reduces the threat posed by hackers.

The obvious benefit of this system is to remove information from fixed points such as localised networks and individual machines. It effectively eliminates vulnerable access points to data storage and protects against unapproved software installation.

The nature of information spreading does, however, open cloud networks to prolonged attacks designed to identify weak points in security. If one server has weakened defences it provides easy access to other localities in the network.

Many governments consider internet regulation the answer to online security issues. The industry stands firm against it, suggesting regulation will throw up compromises to data ownership, access and security protocols depending on the location of servers.

The answer proposed by the industry is for a self-regulatory body dedicated to research and development of stronger cloud security systems. The idea is of a conglomerate effect as the more people who use the cloud, the stronger it becomes.

The implementation of standardised protocols would further enhance security for weaker systems while providing regulatory standards and anticipating future threats.

So, can cloud computing prevent cybercrime? Certainly by limiting solid state access points, there is a mathematical probability that the security web is stronger. Many are still reluctant to trust third party storage, but the evidence does seem to support the idea that dedicated cloud based security is a step in the right direction.

By Akash Valand,

Akash has worked on behalf of several clients offering marketing, research and insight. Most recently security firm

Cloud Infographic: The SMB 2014 Wish List

Cloud Infographic: The SMB 2014 Wish List

Cloud Infographic: The SMB 2014 Wish List

For many small businesses, resources are already stretched thin and owners cannot afford to spend money that is not directly related to business development and results. The cloud is an ideal solution because it’s less expensive than on-premise options. With lower subscription and maintenance costs, small businesses can focus their resources on developing their companies, not buying software and infrastructure. Many SaaS applications give users free trials or accounts, which lets businesses test out different solutions. Small businesses can try out various options until they determine which ones best fit their company and employee needs. Companies that invest in on-premise solutions may find that the tools do not align with their business activities and they can ultimately lose money from unused solutions.  Read the full article by Anthony Smith / CEO of Insightly

Included is an infographic courtesy of which highlights the growing SMB interest in cloud services and adoption in 2014.


Infographic Source:

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Pocket Money

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Pocket Money

By David Fletcher

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Collaborative Economy – Customer Appreciation Day

Collaborative Economy – Customer Appreciation Day

Part 2 – Collaborative Economy – Customer Appreciation Day

This is part 2 of a 2-part post on disruptive technologies and the collaborative economy. Click To Read Part 1

Customer Appreciation Day

Customer Appreciation Day. Signs bearing this message have appeared regularly in store windows and print ads throughout the decades past – a well-intentioned effort to reinvigorate customer loyalty by demonstrating that for one day per year at least, the customer is truly appreciated; which begs the question, how do retailers feel about their customers the rest of the year? In truth, of course, the customer has always been portrayed as “king,” but power was measured in macro-vision, with stores and suppliers responding to requests or complaints over weeks, months or years, and always in line with their own projections of trends and fashions. The customer was king in name only.

Customers, retailers and suppliers exist now in an age of disruptive technology, where real-time access to cloud-based communication and big data has shifted the power balance by 180 degrees and has truly put him/her in charge; and more specifically each individual customer is now king, rather than the collective customer base. This increased level of access and interaction has led to major changes to the speed by which reaction to a customer and innovation happen; and it also challenges the silo mentality of the traditional Business-to-Consumer model, resulting in some innovative collaborations.

Take car manufacturers, for example. They are just one of many big-ticket item suppliers who have recognized that many consumers in the younger demographic are just not buying cars like their elders did. A combination of a shaky economy, bleak job prospects and a heightened sense of mobility and independence have moved younger customers away from long-term commitments such as car payments into shorter, just-in-time relationships with car-sharing services such as Car2Go, AutoShare and ZipCar, where cloud-based reservation and payment systems give greater choice and flexibility. In a fascinating demonstration of the collaborative economy at work, traditional car manufacturers such as Toyota are starting to offer rentals from their dealerships, while Dodge is calling upon family and friends to pitch in towards the cost of a new Dart through crowdsourcing.

Banks such as ING are providing networking and small business virtual offices for their customers and prospects, and airlines are teaming up with taxicab companies to become group carpooling matchmakers.

Retailers and organizations are recognizing that the future of customer relationships is based on individual data gathering and collaboration, especially data that can be gathered through techniques such as gamification, in which customers are invited to log on to a retailer’s website through their FaceBook account, which opens up a whole collection of likes and habits that can be used to create a customized experience. Imagine, for example, a business traveler, landing at JFK airport, receiving a custom text from her favorite running shoe company stating, “Hey, welcome to New York! Since you enjoy open-air running so much, we have sent you a map of an excellent running route through the Upper East Side, close to Central Park. By the way, click here to download some excellent running tunes that match your existing musical likes, and a scannable barcode for a free post-run coffee.” This approach requires dynamic, real-time intelligence on individual tastes and buying habits, and simultaneously demands seamless crossover between vendors of different, yet complementary consumables.

This direct and collaborative relationship between the customer and the supplier is now being referred to as ZeroDistance, and it has implications well beyond traditional retail. Employers, too, are starting to recognize that customer demand has equivalence within the workforce, as more and more employees seek a more flexible and personalized approach to work that includes flex-time, telecommuting and using their own computers and apps (BYOD) rather than company-issued tools. Those who do not see progress in these areas are likely to turn to an unprecedented collection of job-finding and freelancing resources, where yet another layer of the collaborative economy exists, with freelancers providing their skills to employers anywhere in the world.

Simply put, this is all about the consumer bypassing traditional inefficiencies to become the company, which has to be of great interest and concern to any CIO who now sees him/herself like the captain of a schooner, caught in a wild storm on the Niagara River: wind and rain in all directions, masts and booms flailing left and right, while the Falls themselves draw ever closer. The security and reliability of IT must co-exist in careful balance with the need for extreme market agility and reactiveness to customers inside and outside the organization. IT must now start to represent more than just the nuts and bolts of a network, while the marketing department itself must become more real-time data driven; IT faces the grim reality that users are opting for uncontrolled SaaS applications to solve immediate problems (e.g. cloud-based apps), while the various Lines of Business within an organization demand explanations as to why market formation is not coming in fast enough.

ZeroDistance provides an opportunity for a CIO to eliminate the gap between him/herself and the rest of the organization. By mirroring the results of ZeroDistance between customer and supplier, the CIO stands to take on a role as a central architect of a company’s future: a navigator rather than a mechanic. As the C-Suite observes the profound changes occurring in the a wholly customer-driver big data economy, it must recognize that now, more than ever, the silos that defines each officer’s role are as dated as that “Customer Appreciation Day” sign in the window.

Sponsored by T-Systems and the Zero Distance community

By Steve Prentice

IBM To Acquire Aspera To Help Companies Speed Global Movement Of Big Data

IBM To Acquire Aspera To Help Companies Speed Global Movement Of Big Data

IBM to Acquire Aspera to Help Companies Speed Global Movement of Big Data


New Capabilities Allow Organizations To Reduce Transfer Time For Large Data Files From Hours To As Little As Seconds

ARMONK, N.Y. – 19 December 2013: IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced a definitive agreement to acquire Emeryville, CA-based Aspera, Inc. Aspera’s technology helps companies securely speed the movement of massive data files around the world. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Licensed to clients and partners either in the cloud or on premise, Aspera’s high-speed transfer technology reduces transmission times for large files or data sets by up to 99.9 percent – potentially cutting a 26 hour transfer of a 24 gigabyte file, sent halfway around the world, down to just 30 seconds.  Aspera’s patented fasp™ technology overcomes inherent bottlenecks in broadband wide area networks that slow the transfer of extremely large files, such as high-definition video or scientific research files, over distance.

Companies today are struggling to manage increasing volumes of structured and unstructured data created by everything from sensors to social media. They must accelerate the velocity of sending and receiving this data to improve competitiveness in a variety of ways – including the ability to more quickly uncover valuable business insights, bring products to market faster and improve employee productivity. This becomes even more critical with the growing adoption of cloud computing, where companies need a more effective way to transport extremely large files to and from cloud platforms. Aspera moves Big Data to, from and within the cloud faster than traditional methods while providing security, bandwidth control and predictability.

Aspera solutions solve data transfer problems across numerous industries and scenarios such as: 

·        Life sciences organizations sharing genomic data in the quest to find the next medical breakthrough;
·        Media companies shortening production cycles or uploading hit television shows and blockbuster movies to popular consumer streaming services;
·        Gaming companies receiving the latest software build from third party developers to enable rapid game development;
·        Any individual within an enterprise trying to share and synchronize large files over distance between multiple devices such as a laptop, mobile phone or tablet.

Our experience working with thousands of clients on Big Data projects tells us that companies can better compete and win when they can quickly extract value from massive volumes of data,” said John Mesberg, Vice President, B2B and Commerce Solutions, IBM. “With this acquisition, IBM addresses a key challenge for globally integrated enterprises by allowing them to move large data files much faster to the individuals who need them, wherever in the world they may be.”

Our team has redefined how the world’s biggest data can be moved quickly, securely and reliably around the world,” said Michelle Munson, president and co-founder, Aspera. “By tapping into IBM’s innovative capabilities and global resources, we will solve ever expanding data movement challenges for our customers now and in the future.”

Aspera advances the transfer of large files where traditional network protocols limit speed and reliability. Typical data transfers over TCP/IP are hampered by network delays or packet loss, even over the fastest broadband networks. Aspera’s fasp protocol delivers the industry’s fastest transmission speeds over any network link regardless of file size, transfer distance or network conditions. Aspera ensures secure encryption of the files in transit or at rest.

By combining Aspera with the power of cloud computing, customers have a practical way to transport big data files to and from the cloud. Aspera makes cloud computing even faster, more predictable and more cost effective for big data transfers such as enterprise storage backup, sharing virtual images or bursting to the cloud for increased computing capacity. Its fasp technology is licensed to many leading cloud computing services and will be integrated with IBM’s recently acquired SoftLayer cloud infrastructure later next year.

This acquisition builds on IBM’s Smarter Commerce initiative by allowing businesses to accelerate their digital supply chains between partners and suppliers. This also extends IBM’s market-leading capabilities in Managed File Transfer with a complementary set of capabilities to help enterprises further gain control and oversight of their data transfers.

Aspera recently received an Emmy® award for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Development in recognition of its fasp protocol. The academy commented that fasp is an “an industry game changer” used by “virtually all the major broadcast television networks, Hollywood studios and CG/animation houses.”

The acquisition of Aspera is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close in the first quarter 2014.

Cloud Storage And Co-Working: Building A Relationship

Cloud Storage And Co-Working: Building A Relationship

Cloud Storage and Co-Working

Cloud storage is perfect for freelancers. It’s perfect for students, CEOs, and stay-at-home moms. It’s also perfect when you don’t have a permanent office. That’s why cloud storage is great for co-working spaces.

Co-working has moved beyond just a place to drink coffee and respond to emails. Many cities have made co-working spaces into some of the coolest places to collaborate – and a lot of that has to do with the technology. Here are a few ways that cloud storage and co-working are building a stronger relationship, and creating different trends.


Cloud and co-working: Partnerships

Many large companies have begun to partner with co-working spaces – Verizon FiOS Internet recently partnered with HarlemGarage to offer fiber optic Internet. But Verizon isn’t the only one. Tons of spaces have Skype-only conference rooms, and are supported by Google Drive data storage, DropBox and PayPal.  Cloud storage like DropBox can mobilize Web-based information system infrastructure use across a number of businesses that may or may not share a database or shared network.

Now that open access applications have even come to include software applications via cloud computing, and developer communities share new application scripting features, the force of Web-based IS infrastructure has caught on as a mobile co-working experience.

Cloud and co-working: Mobile

With the introduction of mobile apps platforms, employees, consultants, outsourced team members, and start-ups can harness even more flexible talent. The fact that co-workers and partners can tap into a company’s shared network, attend a meeting, and deliver content from any location at any time, maximizes stakeholder decision.

Cloud and co-working: Efficiency

Synchronized data management and administration increases efficiency and effectiveness. Cloud computing has quite literally optimized the co-working process to the point that start-ups can function like established businesses.

Cloud and co-working: Long-distance support

The results to data driven strategies organized between cloud computing service providers and co-working groups are everywhere. For instance, the shared developer exchange program partnership between Cloud Elements in Colorado and Piloto151 in Puerto Rico illustrates the impact of entrepreneurial ecosystems in staging new B2B programs and support systems for start-up ventures across geo-distance.

The Cloud Elements – Piloto151 partnership reflects the virtualization trend in co-working, and the concise solution this singular model of business process infrastructure offers start-up strategists faced with multiple organizational problems. In addition to flexible participation from multi-geographical locations, cloud computing also solves the carbon footprint issue even further.

Co-working is here to stay, which means cloud computing is too. It’s only getting smarter, bigger and more instrumental for daily tasks. Keep an eye on new developments from Amazon and Google to see what the newest trends in cloud computing are – because you can bet that you’ll be seeing more from them in 2014.

By Sam Melton

Harnessing A Virtual Infrastructure To Create A Complete Backup Plan For Your Business

Harnessing A Virtual Infrastructure To Create A Complete Backup Plan For Your Business

Harnessing A Virtual Infrastructure To Create A Complete Backup Plan For Your Business

Conducting business without being dependent on technology is impossible these days because we are all heavily reliant on technology and electronic devices, so much so that it is almost impossible to carry out business without these gadgets! As a business owner, one thing that you must understand is that the more reliant your business is on technology, the higher would be the chances of occurrence of software crashes, hard drive failures and other similar technical problems. In order to protect your business and prevent the loss of important data and files, it is important have a secured backup. A data backup & recovery plan is a must for every business in today’s times.


Sets of Backup

A backup set is a term that is commonly associated with data backup & recovery plan. This set can be defined as the total amount of data or information from a single resource. This backup set is then placed in a media where the backup happens. Thus, if you are backing up files from multiple resources then you will be creating multiple sets of backup. Creating sets of backup is not a one-time task but rather an occasional task that all business enterprises should engage in because new data is constantly generated every day in the company!

Types of Media

The best part about data backup & recovery plan for companies is that they can choose from a variety of types or options. Thus, there is something for every business irrespective of its needs, size, scale of operation, nature of business and so on. There are different kinds of media available for companies who require backup. These are Tape Drives, DVDs, CDs, Zip Drives, Offsite backup and so on.

Off-site Backup

Out of all the different types of media for data backup & recovery plan, the off-site backup would probably be the most useful because it makes no sense to have the backup inside the office because if a natural disaster or a not-so-natural mishap (for e.g. theft) were to happen then the entire data would be lost! Therefore, instead of backing up the files and storing them ‘on site’ it makes more sense to select a distant location wherein the backup data would be stored securely and safely.

Applications Simple Backup

Data backup & recovery plan is not a cakewalk, especially if you have a huge company with plenty of data and information. Therefore, in order to help you out with the data backup process, you can rely on applications that simplify backup. This is great for amateurs or those who have very limited knowledge about data backup on a large scale.

Managing Complexity

There are lots of complications associated with the loss of data in companies, especially large scale ones. Prevention is definitely better than cure in this case because sometimes recovery of lost data is impossible, which means that the data stolen or destroyed is gone forever. Therefore, instead of letting that happen, it is better to employ a reliable and efficient data backup & recovery plan for your company’s betterment.

deney-dentelBy Deney Dentel,

Denny a Health care solutions with HIMSS Portland, Oregon and also cloud computing service provider company. Deney is the only localized and authorised  IBM ProtecTIER business partner in Pacific Northwest. You can also follow him on LinkedIn.

CloudTweaks Comics
Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

Cancer Moonshot In his final State of the Union address in January 2016, President Obama announced a new American “moonshot” effort: finding a cure for cancer. The term “moonshot” comes from one of America’s greatest achievements, the moon landing. If the scientific community can achieve that kind of feat, then surely it can rally around…

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

Ensure Your Cloud Is Always Operational We have become so accustomed to being online that we take for granted the technological advances that enable us to have instant access to everything and anything on the internet, wherever we are. In fact, it would likely be a little disconcerting if we really mapped out all that…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy A few weeks ago I visited the global headquarters of a large multi-national company to discuss cloud strategy with the CIO. I arrived 30 minutes early and took a tour of the area where the marketing team showcased their award winning brands. I was impressed by the digital marketing strategy…

Part 1 – Connected Vehicles: Paving The Way For IoT On Wheels

Part 1 – Connected Vehicles: Paving The Way For IoT On Wheels

Connected Vehicles From cars to combines, the IoT market potential of connected vehicles is so expansive that it will even eclipse that of the mobile phone. Connected personal vehicles will be the final link in a fully connected IoT ecosystem. This is an incredibly important moment to capitalize on given how much time people spend…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…


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