Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Many Changes In The Realm Of Cloud Security For 2014

Many Changes In The Realm Of Cloud Security For 2014

When thinking about information security you may jump straight to the Snowden leaks of 2013. However, this isn’t the only security troubles from last year we can remember. Keep in mind that there were security breaches coming from all over the world, such as the claims of a particular Chinese based group, where information was being snatched from well over a hundred U.S. based organizations. Breaches such as these are pushing world-wide companies, big and small, into spending massive amounts in 2014. Unfortunately, these events are also driving up world-wide competition for cloud service providers (CSP), as well; leading companies that are interested in moving to the cloud away from the U.S. market.security-breach

As you might have already heard, Gartner suggests that security spending will surpass $3 billion by 2015. With that said, it is to be sure that security focused startups will also be on the rise. In fact, top venture capitalists from around the world expect that security startups will be a leading growth sector for this year.

Just a couple of security startups to look for this year include an Andreessen Horowitz supported company called CipherCloud and Bromiom, also supported by Horowitz. While CipherCloud focuses on securing the data itself with its Cloud Information Protection product, Bromium endeavors to secure the end user hardware with its Bromium Microvisor technology.

This year will not be solely about new startups, though; many will merge their products in order to ensure security goals and their survival. One such recent merger includes California based FireEye and D.C. based Mandiant. The two security experts focus on different aspects of information security and together provide a well rounded security product. Though, they have been working together over the years to bring top quality security, the two will now become one.

It is to be sure that there will be many changes this year with regard to cloud computing security. Some changes are easily predicted, such as the enhancement and use of data encryption for all pre-transit, in transit and post transit data, as well as the massive increase in global security budgeting. Other changes we have yet to witness as the year passes by, which will be depicted by the various security obstacles we face this year.

By Glenn Blake

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

A Dark Night For Dropbox

A Dark Night For Dropbox

A Dark Night For Dropbox

San Francisco-based file sharing and cloud storage company Dropbox (www.dropbox.com) suffered a major failure on Friday, January 10, 2014, during which many of its subscribers found it difficult or impossible to access their files over the evening as well as much of Saturday. The company’s homepage presented their version of a Fail Whale, a large band-aid which described the outage as a “500 Error.”

Dropbox fail

Subscribers quickly turned to Twitter both to seek answers and in some cases express outrage, while others leaped to the company’s defense, citing the many years of highly reliable service that have made Dropbox, as well as the concept of cloud storage in general, something that is now taken almost for granted.

In its official explanation, Dropbox was emphatic that the outage was caused during what it called “routine internal maintenance,” and not, as some had believed, by external hackers.

The hacking rumor was based on announcement made on Twitter by a group who claimed affiliation with Anonymous, and who stated the attack was performed to acknowledge the anniversary of the death of Aaron Swartz, a programmer who took his own life on January 11, 2013 after having been accused of stealing documents from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dropbox, which, by its own PR materials, claims 200 million users and 4 million business users, explained the hacking rumors as a hoax.<

As of Sunday morning, January 12, the service had returned to full operation.

By Steve Prentice

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Misunderstanding

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Misunderstanding



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By David Fletcher

All David Fletcher comic images on this site are owned by CloudTweaks.com. If you would like to reuse them on your social media network, please feel free to do so as long as there is a clearly defined link to the original comic source. If you would like to use them in a Newsletter, Print, Powerpoint or Website. Please contact us regarding the licensing details and policies.

Hand Writing: Data, Data, Everywhere, But Let’s Just Stop And Think

Hand Writing: Data, Data, Everywhere, But Let’s Just Stop And Think

Hand Writing: Data, Data, Everywhere, But Let’s Just Stop And Think

Surely nobody who has the slightest awareness of what’s going on in the world can be unaware of the phrase ‘big data’. Almost every day the newspapers and television make reference to it, and it’s ubiquitous on the web. In November, a Google search for the phrase ‘big data’ yielded 1.8 billion hits. Google Trends shows that the rate of searches for the phrase is now about ten times what it was at the start of 2011.

The phrase defies an exact definition: one can define it in absolute terms (so many gigabytes, petabytes, etc) or in relative terms (relative to your computational resources), and in other ways. The obvious way for data to be big is by having many units (e.g., stars in an astronomical database), but it could also be big in terms of the number of variables (e.g., genomic data), the number of times something is observed (e.g., high frequency financial data), or by virtue of its complexity (e.g., the number of potential interactions in a social network).

Data-Scientists_Infographic

However one defines it, the point about ‘big data’ is the implied promise—of wonderful discoveries concealed within the huge mass, if only one can tease them out. That this is exactly the same promise that data mining made some twenty years ago is no accident. To a large extent, ‘big data’ is merely a media rebranding of ‘data mining’ (and of ‘business analytics’ in commercial contexts), and the media coining of the phrase ‘big data’ goes some way towards explaining the suddenness of the rise in interest.

Broadly speaking, there are two kinds of use of big data. One merely involves searching, sorting, matching, concatenating, and so on. So, for example, we get directions from Google maps, we learn how far away the next bus is, and we find a shop stocking the item we want. But the other use, and my personal feeling is there are more problems of this kind, involves inference. That is, we don’t actually want to know about the data we have but about data we might have had or might have in the future. What will happen tomorrow? Which medicine will make us better? What is the true value of some attribute? What would have happened had things been different? While computational tools are the keys to the first kind of problem, statistical tools are the keys to the second.

If big data is another take on data mining (looking at it from the resources end, rather than the tool end) then perhaps we can learn from the data mining experience. We might suspect, for example, that interesting and valuable discoveries will be few and far between, that many discoveries will turn out to be uninteresting, or obvious, or already well-known, and that most will be explainable by data errors. For example, big data sets are often accumulated as a side-effect of some other process—calculating how much to charge for a basket of supermarket purchases, deciding what prescription is appropriate for each patient, marking the exams of individual students—so we must be wary of issues such as selection bias. Statisticians are very aware of such things, but others are not.

As far as errors are concerned, a critical thing about big data is that the computer is a necessary intermediary: the only way you can look at the data is via plots, models, and diagnostics. You cannot examine a massive data set point by point. If data themselves are one step in a mapping from the phenomenon being studied, then looking at those data through the window of the computer is yet another step. No wonder errors and misunderstandings creep in.

Moreover, while there is no doubt that big data opens up new possibilities for discovery, that does not mean that ‘small data’ are redundant. Indeed, I might conjecture an informal theorem: the number of data sets of size n is inversely related to n. There will be vastly more small data sets than big ones, so we should expect proportionately more discoveries to emerge from small data sets.

Neither must we forget that data and information are not the same: it is possible to be data rich but information poor. The manure heap theorem is of relevance here. This mistaken theorem says that the probability of finding a gold coin in a heap of manure tends to 1 as the size of the heap tends towards infinity. Several times, after I’ve given talks about the potential of big data (stressing the need for effective tools, and describing the pitfalls outlined above), I have had people, typically from the commercial world, approach me to say that they’ve employed researchers to study their massive data sets, but to no avail: no useful information has been found.

Finally, the bottom line: to have any hope of extracting anything useful from big data, and to overcome the pitfalls outlined above, effective inferential skills are vital. That is, at the heart of extracting value from big data lies statistics.

David-J-HandBy David J Hand

David Hand is Senior Research Investigator and Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Imperial College, London, and Chief Scientific Advisor to Winton Capital Management. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, and a recipient of the Guy Medal of the Royal Statistical Society. He has served (twice) as President of the Royal Statistical Society, and is on the Board of the UK Statistics Authority. He has published 300 scientific papers and 25 books.

Original post can be seen in the Institute of Mathematical Statistics Bulletin, January/February 2014bulletin.imstat.org

3 Ways To Protect Your Financial Data

3 Ways To Protect Your Financial Data

3 Ways To Protect Your Financial Data

Cybersecurity

Recent retail foibles have us all a bit on edge about our personal data. High-profile security breaches at Target and on SnapChat remind us it can happen anywhere, to anyone. It leaves us marveling a bit (not in a good way) at how a simple transaction can cause a great deal of angst in the weeks after it.

I never go to Target,” one friend said at a post-holiday party to me. “But I did just before Christmas. Not even for gifts, but for shampoo. And I used my debit card.

“So now, I’m checking my statement every day, calling about the balance, hoping the bank is also keeping an eye out for me …”

Retailers and social-media administrators work hard to protect your data, and breaches like the ones Snapchat and Target recently experienced are nightmares for those entities. The problem is, hackers and scammers work just as hard to beat the system and get to your data.

There’s no such thing as “hacker proof,” it turns out.

Here’s what happened

1. Target

Hackers accessed data for as many as 40 million credit and debit cards used at Target locations in December, including encrypted data that contained personal identification numbers. Target claims the PIN data is not at risk, but cybercrime experts still warn against potential of risk.

Action: Target offers free credit monitoring for those who might have been affected by the breach. If you were affected, that’s not much help now, but at least you’re protected from another attack.

2. SnapChat

This photo-messaging app predicated on privacy – messages disappear after they’re seen – was breached with a “find friends” feature that revealed data for 4.6 million users. Although this breach had no financial implications, the compromise was of concern to many SnapChat customers.

Action: Site administrators issued a new version of the app that allowed users to opt out of the “find friends” feature.

Here’s what you can do to protect yourself

Here are three things you can do today to help keep yourself a step ahead of the bad guys.

1. Register for free credit monitoring

Companies such as Credit Karma will protect against identity theft and unauthorized purchases. It monitors your credit nightly, and sends an email if anything unusual appears, including new accounts opened in your name. Credit Karma also safeguards against inaccurate credit reports.

Bonus: In the market for financial services? Credit Karma also offers consumer reviews for credit cards, mortgages and insurance purchases too.

2. Protect your data—physically and online

Your social security card should never live in your wallet. Also, your passwords and usernames shouldn’t be kept on a piece of paper, in your wallet, car or home. Never give out your social security number to anyone who calls you and claims they’re from your financial institution.

Banks, credit card providers, and utility companies will never do that. In the wake of the Target breach, companies like Verizon and Wells Fargo have even proactively notified their customers that they never solicit information via email or phone call.

Bonus: Multi-platform app LastPass manages and encrypts passwords across all your services.

3. Set up mobile alerts

Some financial institutions, such as Citizens Bank, offer mobile alerts of any account activity. These services will send you a message if your account balance dips below a specified amount, signal a check clearance, and even send your five most recent transactions on a schedule you set.

Most national banks and large credit card companies offer similar services, so take advantage of them.

Bonus: Consider changing your debit card’s PIN number on biannually or annually, or if you suspect your information was released in a breach like Target’s. Although PIN information is encrypted once you enter it on the keypad, it’s good peace of mind to actively change the first wall of defense from someone withdrawing money in your name from an ATM.

4. Protect your network

Keep your electronic data safe from prying eyes at home by securing your WiFi network. Many Internet providers include wireless routers with their service. Setting a protected network is easy, and worth the five minutes spent.

Data stored on the cloud is vulnerable to hackers. Massachusetts Institution of Technology researchers have developed protection against hacks to memory-access pattern analysis (the means by which computers store and access data) by broadcasting false information to remote server data requests.

Bonus: When you don’t have other people jumping on your wireless service, you could experience faster speeds. Lock up that wireless signal!

By Alexis Caffrey

Alexis is a freelance writer with a focus on technology, new media, and design . You can reach Alex via @AlexisCaffrey or alexiscaffrey.com.

The Year Of The Cloud – Without Debate

The Year Of The Cloud – Without Debate

The Year Of The Cloud – Without Debate

Unlike last year, where Cloud success and expansion was greatly debated among the world of technology, this year will be the year of the Cloud and all it has to offer.cloud-2014-trends

With bring your own devices or BYOD’s on the rise, enhancing device security will also have massive growth and effort put into it. Of course, device security will not be the sole focus for organizations. They will also, obviously, look to better security in both the private and public cloud sectors. Further, also with regard to security, this will also be the year that U.S. based cloud service providers or CSP’s will begin to see major competition from around the world. This is mostly due to the major 2013 security scandals based out of the U.S. One such example is that of Brazil and their attempts to keep cloud based info local.

Other aspects of the Cloud such as PaaS will also be more heavily focused on this year than ever as big wigs like Amazon Web Services continue to enhance and ensure the best of the business. This year it will be about specificity of PaaS for each and every client, suggests tech specialist Kaplan; only those with the most talent for providing real solutions will prevail.

As analyst Mathew from Alteryx quotes Andreessen’s once popular software is eating the world, he continues on to say that 2014 will be the year that analytics eats the world. Big data and analytics this year will become more valuable than ever, especially in the realm of marketing. Specialists will quickly learn how best to use the enormous amounts of data collected to provide valuable information to clients.

Larry Freeman, cloud analyst, also calculates that with the pressure on Cloud usage, performance, control and cost are all things to look for when shopping around. Even governments have turned to the Cloud for services; this may be just what the economy needed to tip the Cloud space usage iceberg over the edge. With that said, many are wondering which of cloud sectors – private or public – will triumph? However, it is thought that the Hybrid cloud services will most likely lead us through the year as companies will look to combinations of both worlds to best suit their needs in storage space, security and budgeting.

By Glenn Blake

Keeping The Promise Of Unlimited Data Transfer

Keeping The Promise Of Unlimited Data Transfer

Keeping the Promise of Unlimited Data Transfer

Is unlimited anything actually achievable? It is quite a normal question for a customer to ask, regardless whether the product in question is data transfer on the cloud, or the all-you-can-eat buffet at the local restaurant. Can an unlimited deal really be that good?

logoCWCS1

In the case of cloud hosting it appears it can, and according to Karl Mendez, Managing Director of UK-based CWCS Managed Hosting, when customers choose wisely, they can indeed enjoy service on an unlimited scale.

That is why CWCS Managed Hosting has recently announced that it would become one of the few UK-based cloud providers to offer unlimited data transfer. Recognizing the growing need for more and more space for information flow, Mendez and his team launched a program that would provide service that would keep pace.

The three key factors in satisfactory data transfer and cloud services are strength, reliability, and cost,” says Mendez. “Strength refers to the capacity to actually send the data through the pipes to where it needs to go. You could officially call this bandwidth. But complementary to that,” he adds, “are the issues of cost – especially the hidden costs that certain providers levy when there is a spike in demand, such as when a customer’s website traffic increases. We have eliminated that. There is also reliability, in that a provider must be up and stay up to ensure that customers are able to communicate with their own customers, even when there is great demand on the system.

In describing this latter scenario, Mendez is referring to a problem called distributed downtime, in which a cloud services company’s subscribers may unwittingly or unwillingly share a temporary downgrade in throughput in order to load-balance the requirements of another customer. This, Mendez says, is very common among cloud providers, who seem to offer unlimited services, but who themselves are limited by the size of their own pipe. “You really have to read the fine print of your contract,” he says.

Mendez continues, “At CWCS we can offer unlimited bandwidth because we run, manage and operate our own data centres. We’ve set up our own cloud infrastructure and we’ve invested significant amounts in our resources. We use high specification equipment and servers and we have deliberately built in a high amount of spare capacity. In addition, unlike some other hosting companies, we never oversell (which means we never offer capacity that we don’t actually have). So basically we can offer unlimited data transfer without affecting performance”.

The demand for more ubiquitous and robust cloud services grows daily. Numerous recent developments highlight the growing need for data throughput on a large scale; an example: the adoption of high volume Wi-Fi in public spaces such as subways, airports, planes and trains that allows passengers to not merely check their email, but to watch their own movies as they travel.

Many companies will of course, jump onto the unlimited bandwagon, but Mendez warns, they are not all able to deliver as promised, or in the configurations that match a customer’s existing structure. The strategy employed by CWCS Managed Hosting is to offer unlimited data transfer through its own recommended cloud server plans, but as well as through any cloud servers that clients have configured themselves and ordered online using CWCS’s cloud server configuration tool.

Mendez points out that to protect its customers from the types of failure or abuse they might encounter elsewhere, CWCS Managed Hosting incorporates fair and acceptable usage policies so activities such as spamming, illegal file sharing, disproportionate or excessive use of resources.

Unlimited data will become as in-demand in a few short months or years, as high-speed Wi-Fi is currently, says Mendez.

He recommends that any company looking to purchase this service to better serve their customers take the time to work through the details carefully to make sure they – and their cloud provider – can deliver as promised.

By Steve Prentice

Post Sponsored By CWCS Managed Hosting

How The New Windows 8.1 Update Puts Cloud Computing Front And Centre

How The New Windows 8.1 Update Puts Cloud Computing Front And Centre

New Windows 8.1 Update Puts Cloud Computing Front And Centre

If you have been following news in the tech industry at all lately, then you should probably be aware that Microsoft just released the latest version of Windows on October 18th, and may well already have a copy of it up and running on your machine. While some early adopters already had the buggy ‘preview’ version of 8.1 running on their machines, only now is the new operating system officially available in its finalized form, and so far the reviews have been positive.

One of the things that reviewers are praising about the new system is the heavy integration of the cloud into the very workings of this new Windows. As a feature, it’s incredibly useful for everyone from casual users to big businesses, and as an indication of the direction that things are heading it’s very telling and very interesting.

The Cloud and Windows 8.1

So how is Microsoft pushing the cloud in Windows 8.1?

Well specifically it’s through the use of their already popular and established ‘SkyDrive’ service. Essentially this is a cloud storage service much like iCloud or DropBox, except that it is now much more integrated into the Windows experience.

For instance, when you open an explorer window, you will be greeted with the usual quick links down the left including ‘This PC’ (My Computer) and the usual ‘favorites’. Now though you will also have the additional ‘SkyDrive’ tab right on the left allowing you to treat it just as any other folder. And when you save a file in the new Microsoft Office you will be encouraged to do so using ‘Documents’ on the SkyDrive rather than ‘Documents’ on your C drive. Essentially this will make it much quicker and easier to access those files than ever before – allowing you to treat them as though they were in any other folder on your computer meaning that in theory, you should never forget to back anything up.

Other Windows ‘apps’ make further use of this extra storage too, often opting to save onto SkyDrive to ensure that you never lose your files. Take a photo with the camera app for instance and that picture will be dutifully saved to the cloud for you to access later.

The Cloud is the Way Forward

When Microsoft started selling its Surface Pro line of devices, they made the choice to offer 7GB worth of free storage to anyone who bought one. As the built-in storage on those devices was relatively paltry, this helped to make the deal a little sweeter and ensured that users would have somewhere to store their larger files.

But now the Surface 2 is out, and this time Microsoft are offering a whopping 200GB of free storage to anyone who buys one. This is the most free storage that has ever been given away in a comparable deal and maybe a real sign of things to come.

Clearly Microsoft understands the power and the importance of the cloud in modern computing. It will be interesting to see how companies like Apple and Google respond, and what the next evolution in cloud storage will be…

By Gregory Fisher

Gregory , started Berkeley Sourcing Group eight years ago after realizing the need for efficient processes and coordination between manufacturing firms located in the United States and factories in China. He has a strong manufacturing and engineering background and is proficient in Mandarin.

CloudTweaks Comics
Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Cloud Compliance  Regulatory compliance is an issue that has not only weighed heavily on the minds of executives, security and audit teams, but also today, even end users. Public cloud adds more complexity when varying degrees of infrastructure (depending on the cloud model) and data fall out of the hands of the company and into…

Cloud Infographic – Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences

Cloud Infographic – Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences

Cloud Public, Private & Hybrid Differences Many people have heard of cloud computing. There is however a tremendous number of people who still cannot differentiate between Public, Private & Hybrid cloud offerings.  Here is an excellent infographic provided by the group at iWeb which goes into greater detail on this subject. Infographic source: iWeb

Are Women Discriminated Against In The Tech Sector?

Are Women Discriminated Against In The Tech Sector?

Women Discriminated Against In Tech Sector It is no secret that the tech industry is considered sexist since most women are paid less than men; there are considerably fewer women in tech jobs; and generally men get promoted above women. Yet the irony is twofold. Firstly, there is an enormous demand for employees with skills…

Five Signs The Internet of Things Is About To Explode

Five Signs The Internet of Things Is About To Explode

The Internet of Things Is About To Explode By 2020, Gartner estimates that the Internet of Things (IoT) will generate incremental revenue exceeding $300 billion worldwide. It’s an astoundingly large figure given that the sector barely existed three years ago. We are now rapidly evolving toward a world in which just about everything will become…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

Cloud Computing and Finland Green Technology

Cloud Computing and Finland Green Technology

Green Technology Finland Last week we touched upon how a project in Finland had blended two of the world’s most important industries, cloud computing and green technology, to produce a data centre that used nearby sea water to both cool their servers and heat local homes.  Despite such positive environmental projects, there is little doubt that…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy A few weeks ago I visited the global headquarters of a large multi-national company to discuss cloud strategy with the CIO. I arrived 30 minutes early and took a tour of the area where the marketing team showcased their award winning brands. I was impressed by the digital marketing strategy…

Comparing Cloud Hosting Services

Comparing Cloud Hosting Services

Cloud Hosting Services Cloud hosting service providers are abundant and varied, with typical structures affording the reliability of virtual partitions, drawing resources externally; secure data centers; scalability and flexibility not limited by physical constraints; pay-per-use costing; and responsive load balancing for changing demands. While high end (and high price) services offer an extensive range of…

15 Cloud Data Performance Monitoring Companies

15 Cloud Data Performance Monitoring Companies

Cloud Data Performance Monitoring Companies (Updated: Originally Published Feb 9th, 2015) We have decided to put together a small list of some of our favorite cloud performance monitoring services. In this day and age it is extremely important to stay on top of critical issues as they arise. These services will accompany you in monitoring…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…