Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Plan Ahead For A Successful Cloud Migration

Plan Ahead For A Successful Cloud Migration

Migrating your information systems to the cloud can be a complex process. However, the factors most attributable to the success of the project are not. By addressing these issues well in advance, you will avoid many of the pitfalls that can derail migration projects.

Below are some questions to ask before you initiate the project. Your responses will provide a clear roadmap for the overall project and should make it easier to isolate and resolve more technical issues as they arise.

cloud-migration

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Why are you migrating your systems to the cloud?

Identify the core reasons for migrating each of your applications to the cloud. Although there is clearly an industry trend toward cloud migration, it is not necessarily the best solution for all of your applications.

If the driving factor is cost savings, be sure that your cost analysis is accurate. While cloud deployments may well provide long term cost savings, they may not always have the immediate impact that many organizations are looking for.

What type of cloud services do you need?

Your reasons for migrating should quickly lead you to which types of cloud services you need.

  • Infrastructure as a Service (IAAS): Generally provides only the physical or virtual servers along with the infrastructure to run them.
  • Platform as a Service (PAAS): In addition to IAAS services, an operating system and language interpreter is included.
  • Software as a Service (SAAS): In addition to PAAS services, the application software is included. This is typically a complete turn-key software solution.

Are you interested in public, private or hybrid clouds?

With public clouds, your applications are run on servers shared with other entities. Private clouds generally require dedicated servers either locally or hosted. Public clouds tend to be more flexible, scalable and affordable while private clouds tend to be more secure. As the name implies hybrid clouds employ a mix of both public and private clouds. Below are some other issues that may affect your decision.

  • Regulatory Constraints – If you are associated with the health care or financial industries, there may be privacy or control issues that preclude you from using a public cloud for some of your applications or data. Organizations subject to PCI compliance may have similar issues. Be sure to identify any that may affect you.
  • Security Concerns – Even if it is allowed, some organizations are still uncomfortable storing sensitive data in the public cloud. Assess the situation at your particular organization.
  • Performance – While the public cloud will frequently improve performance, it can also have negative impacts on some applications or databases. The potential effects on performance should be reviewed for each individual application you hope to migrate.
  • Even if limitations on some applications or data mandate a private cloud, it’s likely that you have other applications or data that are perfectly suited to the public cloud. In this case, a hybrid cloud solution may be the best for you.

Which applications should you migrate first (if any)?

The conventional wisdom is that cloud migration should be a gradual process. The easiest applications should be migrated first. These will provide good testing, comfort level and even training for the more difficult applications to come. Here’s what to look for:

  • If you are adding new applications that are conducive to the cloud, be sure to focus on these first. If these are replacing an existing system, you may be able to eliminate most of the migration tasks for the old application altogether.
  • If you are upgrading existing applications, it may make sense to go ahead and include the cloud migration in the upgrade process.
  • Software licensing is a critical issue when it comes to cloud migration. Be sure that you thoroughly review the cost implications for each software license to avoid big surprises when you go live.
  • The architecture of some applications is simply not conducive to a cloud environment, particularly when it comes to performance. Review this issue for every application you plan to migrate. Mobile apps, web apps and even some old mainframe based apps may work best. Some client–server applications, however, may be more of a challenge.
  • Stand-alone applications without many interfaces to other programs are generally better candidates for migration. Legacy systems with complex spaghetti-like linkages to other systems are the most difficult.
  • If you have already virtualized an application on a local server, it will be much easier to migrate to a cloud-based server. Some service providers have tools specifically developed to facilitate this.

Who will be your service provider?

Selecting a service provider that is a good fit for your organization is critical. Look for providers who already provide the same level of service for enterprises similar to yours. Be sure to address issues related to performance, reliability, backup and security with prospective providers.

Work with your provider to set up adequate testing environments. There is no substitution for exhaustive testing. Discuss contingency plans for rolling back the migration if unforeseen issues arise.

Drill down to the actual cost you can expect to pay for the service. Because there may be many cost variables, it might be helpful to estimate the costs associated with some hypothetical scenarios (perhaps light, medium and heavy loads).

Who will be affected by changes?

Once you have a good idea of where you are going with your project, it’s important to identify and communicate the expected impacts on the stakeholders in your organization. Migration projects can potentially change job responsibilities or eliminate positions altogether. These issues should be addressed and communicated to the affected employees on the front-end.

Try to get buy-in from all parties involved before you begin the implementation. An enthusiastic team will greatly contribute to the success of your project.

When properly done, migration to the cloud can transform your business and make you more competitive. Careful planning to develop a safe, measured approach to the project will help to ensure a successful outcome.

By Allison Rice,

Allison works for Amsterdam Printing, a leading provider of promotional products to grow your business and thank customers. Allison writes on Information Technology and marketing topics for the Small Business Know-How blog.

Cloud Startup: Zuora – Helping Businesses Shift To Subscription-Based Sales

Cloud Startup: Zuora – Helping Businesses Shift To Subscription-Based Sales

Startup Zuora: Helping Businesses Shift To Subscription-Based Sales Via Their SaaS AndThe Cloud

Over the years, there has been an evolution of how companies sell products; especially as companies are building new business models to reflect the changing commerce world with online sales and such. Seeing as startups are building from the ground up integrating a new platform can be easier, especially with the various models out there today, such as Dropbox and Netfilx. However, for those businesses that have been running for decades, changing their long used SAP or Oracle run programs to the more widely-used subscriptions based scheme can be complex.  From switching decades of client data between platforms, to assisting employees and customers with the change, depending on how large the company, the change can seem overwhelming. However, altering one’s platform to evolve with the market is essential for survival. That is where startup Zuora comes in!

Zuora

Zuora is a newer, yet successful company that has been assisting businesses transition from the traditional sales- one item at a time- to the more commonly used subscription –based sales for the past five years. Their client base includes businesses such as Pearson, Zendesk, Dell, Box, Vnumedia and more.

Zuora was created back in 2007 by entrepreneur Tien Tzuo. Since its start, the company has reeled over $130 million in funding, $50 million of which was raised in September. Zuora has brought on board new investors including Northgate Capital, Vulcan Capital and Next World Capital. On top of building capital, the startup itself has grown significantly including nearly doubling their employee base, totaling to around three hundred staff.

It isn’t just about transitioning, Zuora offers an all inclusive software as a service, or SaaS. The product assists with selling, billing and reports.  Zuora’s cloud-based tools allow clients of all sizes to build, scale and maintain their subscribers continually with ease. Zuora works with various fields of specialty including telecom, healthcare, cloud services and media.

Zuora’s platforms are built for two different business types: high growth and enterprise.  With the high growth platform, also known as Z-Business Growth, clients have tools for e-commerce and proportionately sized sales assistance. Zuora also helps their clients compile customer information, such as credit card data and other billing data, along with subscription data to create automated recurring billing and renewal for the client’s customers. Zuora’s Enterprize platform assists clients in a similar way just on a much larger scale with more complex capabilities. Both Zuora’s Z Business and Z Enterprise offer a free trial to new customers.

The Zuora team in continually upgrading and altering their platform to best suit the needs of their clients. Zuora’s website shows new platform features, currently 2013 Q3, along with previous features, 2013 Q1 and Q2. They offer demos and detailed information on how subscription commerce is flourishing.

By Glenn Blake

Business Versus Technical Cloud Brokers And Why It Matters

Business Versus Technical Cloud Brokers And Why It Matters

Business Versus Technical Cloud Brokers

Gartner predictsBy 2015, at least 20% of all cloud services will be consumed via internal or external cloud service brokerages, rather than directly, up from less than 5% today.” Thus, it is important to understand what a cloud broker is and what they do; however, before we can do that, we need to clear up some confusion between different definitions and implementations of cloud brokers.

The term “cloud broker” was defined by NIST in Special Publication 500-292, the NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture, as “An entity that manages the use, performance and delivery of cloud services, and negotiates relationships between Cloud Providers and Cloud Consumers.” The use of the word “entity” makes it ambiguous as to whether a broker is a person or a software service; however, most interpreted this “actor” as a person or persons in a business. NIST divides the broker’s services into three categories service intermediation, service aggregation, and service arbitrage. Service intermediation means the broker enhances a vendor’s cloud service and provides that enhanced service to the cloud consumer (in essence, “wrapping” the cloud provider’s service to provide enhanced functionality). Service aggregation is where the broker integrates or combines multiple services into a single new service like in the case of data integration. Service arbitrage is where a broker arbitrates between multiple vendors and the client to select the best provider. NIST cleared up the ambiguity of this definition in a later special publication, 500-299, the NIST Cloud Computing Security Reference Architecture where it clearly differentiated between a “cloud business broker” and a “cloud technical broker”. In this article, we will explore the differences between these two concepts and how both are being leveraged today.

broker-cloud

A cloud business broker is the traditional definition of a broker, akin to a stockbroker or commodity broker, where an intermediary assists a customer in navigating through a complex environment of many options. A better name for this may be “cloud agent.” An early example of this was the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) that was designated as the Department of Defense’ (DoD) cloud broker on June 26, 2013. Another Government example is the Intelligence Community (IC) CIO which is leading other IC agencies to develop and migrate to a community cloud. On the commercial side, there are companies like Cloudsherpas.com that offer cloud business broker services.

A cloud technical broker pertains to a new type of software that sits on top of cloud providers to abstract, simplify and map various cloud offerings to your environment. Cloud broker software assists organizations in creating solutions in the cloud, migrating solutions to the cloud and moving solutions between clouds. Examples of cloud technical broker software are the Gravitant platform, Incadence Strategic Solutions (my company) Axon Cloud Broker, the Compatible One Open Source cloud broker and JamCracker.

These two concepts – business role and software tool – can be effectively combined in the Office of the Chief Information Officer for an organization whereby the CIO uses one to better perform the other. “Gartner Inc. analyst Dru Reeves said CIOs are best positioned to be service brokers because they possess both the technical knowledge and implementation experience to grasp the risks cloud services pose to the business.” Many CIOs in both the Government and Private sector are gladly stepping into this role. Secondly, CIOs can leverage a technical cloud broker to assist their business units in evaluating and selecting cloud providers and help them to migrate their applications to that selected provider. One cloud broker vendor, Gravitant, cites a State of Texas Case study where they successfully tested the Gravitant platform and business units were able to use its procurement workflow tool to select and design the best cloud platforms for their needs. In regards to Application Migration to the cloud, InCadence Strategic Solutions (whom I work for), has migrated its Army customers applications to the cloud using its Axon Cloud broker software.

In this article, we have distinguished between business and technical cloud brokers and shown the value of both. We also examined how smart CIOs are combining these concepts to help their organizations select the best provider and migrate their legacy applications to the cloud.

michael

By Michael C.Daconta,

Michael is the Vice President of Advanced Technology at InCadence Strategic Solutions and the former Metadata Program Manager for the Department of Homeland Security.  His new book is entitled, “The Great Cloud Migration: Your Roadmap to Cloud Computing, Big Data and Linked Data”.  

Disaster Recovery And Business Continuity – Flirting With Disaster

Disaster Recovery And Business Continuity – Flirting With Disaster

Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity

Nobody likes to think about the bad things that can happen in life, but all too often, history has shown that procrastinating on safeguards means a bigger and more expensive cleanup to follow. This is why, in business, the principles of Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity are so important; and with all things business, the cloud is turning out to be an excellent place for companies to turn to for solutions.

Disaster Recovery (DR) is not the same thing as making backups,” says Keao Caindec, Chief Marketing Officer, Cloud Business Unit at Dimension Data (http://www.dimensiondata.com). “A backup is much like a snapshot or duplication of all your data – from accounting to application files to email, stored offsite in a secure location. It may be safe, but the files are very, very large, and quite difficult to re-integrate quickly. Disaster Recovery, by contrast, is a plan for actively re-injecting critical information back into a company’s core business operations, in the case of a major outage or failure. It has to be much more dynamic and fast.”DimensionData Graphic

Caindec suggests that clients can realize clear benefits by moving their DR plan to the cloud, with cost savings of 70% up to 90% from traditional tape-based backup and restore systems. He states these savings come from a dynamic system of load sharing that Dimension Data specializes in. “Typical DR,” he says, “is about replicating data in real time. If the first site goes down, you repoint the DNS to a second fully-stocked site. But DR sites can be expensive. You must keep the system running as an insurance policy. The way we do it in the cloud, you can set up the data and hold it in disk, but you do not have to have unused servers running. All the client pays for is storage cost, a nominal rate of USD 0.0003 per GB/hour. If disaster happens, we then fire up the servers and start delivering data back downwards in a matter of hours.

Another major cost source comes from the depth of the recovery; in other words, how far back in time do you wish to restore from? Caindec points out that most companies set both a Restore Time Objective (RTO) and a Restore Point Objective (RPO), which jointly answer the question of how far back in time and data does a client need to go to get back up to speed? For example, to meet the needs of a financial client, RTO can be about 4 hours, which can be expensive. With a cloud-based RPO it can be a fraction of the cost, since it is easier to map usage to the actual profile of a client’s business requirement.

Caindec’s statements come at a time when companies of all sizes – even those with well-established backup and DR systems in place, are migrating out of the age in which only non-critical projects are cloud-based. They are recognizing the value and reliability of moving mission-critical data there too.

He cites a Dimension Data case study, in which their client, ClearBenefits, an employee benefits and health plan administration service, was able to improve their Service Level Agreement (SLA) from 95% to 99.9%, which enabled them to better fulfil their compliance with Heath Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations through the development of a “hybrid cloud solution, using its cloud offering for the public-facing front end, and a private database back-end. The business continuity site is hosted separately from their primary site.”

Ultimately, the issue comes down to how effectively a company can: 1.) get back to operations after an onsite event such as a network outage or physical force majeure event, 2.) get back to operations when employees have to set up shop elsewhere, and 3.) maintain the system in a state of readiness that is both reliable and cost-effective.disaster-recovery-cartoon

Support for the Dimension Data approach, and testimony to their success as a provider of cloud solutions, can be seen in a recent white paper published by the IT research company Saugatuck Technology – not commissioned by Dimension Data – which compared the total cost of ownership of in-house/private cloud solutions against several public cloud infrastructure offerings, including Dimension Data Public Compute-as-a-Service (CaaS), IBM SmartCloud and Rackspace Cloud. Among the broader findings, the report found:

  • When running a small workload, Dimension Data’s cloud solutions were significantly less in cost vs. the other public cloud offerings for all scenarios listed.
  • Dimension Data’s public cloud solutions were less expensive than in-house/private cloud solutions in two of the three variably optimized environments when running a small workload.

This report, Caindec says, is yet another proofpoint of the economic benefits of Dimension Data’s CaaS offerings, and follows on the heels of a report by the Tolly Group, which found that between Amazon, Rackspace, IBM and Dimension Data, the network-centric approach used by Dimension Data’s enterprise-class cloud helped lower cost and risk, and accelerate migration of mission-critical apps to the cloud.

Ultimately, he says, a company has to review its Business Continuity strategy regularly, not only for audit purposes but for actual insurance against critical failure of operations. The use of the dynamic characteristics of the cloud makes it easier and cheaper than ever, without compromising integrity.

For a copy of the Dimension Data white paper on DR, click here

To read the Saugatuck Report, click here

By Steve Prentice

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Terrified

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Terrified



October-Halloween

By David Fletcher

All David Fletcher comic images on this site are owned by CloudTweaks.com. If you would like to reuse them on your social media network, please feel free to do so as long as there is a clearly defined link to the original comic source. If you would like to use them in a Newsletter, Print, Powerpoint or Website. Please contact us regarding the licensing details and policies.

Cloud Startup: How AppZero Can Help!

Cloud Startup: How AppZero Can Help!

Most Businesses Have Transitioned To The Cloud, But Not Everyone – AppZero Can Help!

app-zero-logo

While over half of U.S. businesses currently use cloud computing in some way or another, there are still so many out there who have not yet jumped on board. It isn’t that surprising, though, considering just how complicated it can be to move an entire IT system of applications to the cloud or to another server. These challenges are just what the AppZero team endeavor to solve, and thus far, have gotten high remarks and positive feedback from clients and on-lookers.

With the rise in cloud computing usage, many, along with AppZero, endeavor to provide a transitional service and software, including Nebula, Rackspace, OnApp, AWS and more.

So, what does AppZero provide that others may not? AppZero’s best qualities include providing their unbeatable Zapp migration technology. This technology seamlessly moves business Windows applications to and over the cloud, whether it is private, public or hybrid, with AppZero Cloud, as well as to other data centers with AppZero Enterprise. For example, with the latest news that WS2003 is finally coming to an end, many companies will need assistance moving their data. from WS2003 to WS2008 or WS2012. AppZero is build for speed, with simple click of the mouse application transfer from old servers to the newer ones like WS2008 and WS2012.

One of the biggest challenges today with moving such enormous amounts of information in and amongst many applications is attempting to move it all without changing or adapting the information in some way. AppZero’s Zapp does just this without the need to re-work or adjust any data, which is the miraculous aspect of its capabilities. What takes other experts days and even weeks AppZero does in minutes.

Since their launch, AppZero has brought in over $15 million in funding between angels and VCs such as Nigel Stokes, who is also AppZero’s chairman and leading investor and Covington, a VC company out of Canada. AppZero has also reached out and partnered with many world renowned companies, including CA Technologies, HP Cloud Services, Amazon Web Service, IBM SmartCloud Enterprise and RackSpace.

As businesses continue to leap into cloud computing more and more companies, such as AppZero, will endeavor to assist in the transition. While there are strong competitors in the field, few thus far have been able to provide what AppZero can, in the time they can, and with as few alterations as they do. AppZero seems to have worked out how best to assist businesses with IT migration from their conventional structure to the more commonly used cloud technology of today with ease and piece of mind.

For more information about Zapp and AppZero services why not take part in an online seminar?

By Glenn Blake

Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress Discussions

It was as cloudy as Edinburgh could be in the autumn, when the “Cloud Security Alliance Annual EMEA Congress” featuring about 300 Cloud Computing stake-holders, gathered for the event that was held during the last week of September, produced By MISTI Europe.csa-sm

The variety of organizations participating demonstrated the array of topics relevant to Cloud Computing adoption. Standards institutions – alongside government bodies, cloud providers and software vendors – demonstrated the challenges facing Cloud Computing. The considerable number of non-EU presenters further demonstrated the globalization process this technology is going through these days, as well as the EU’s role in its advancement.

The Congress’s topics could generally be divided into three major categories: government access to data (inspired by PRISM); the cloud providers’ lack of transparency; and the technological challenges facing Cloud Computing adoption.

The congress began with an excellent keynote presentation from Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer for F-Secure. Circling the stage, Mr. Hypponen listed the new cyber threats facing the world, and predicted that will see be attacks on every device equipped with processor in order to use CPU time for Bitcoins mining, and that malware will start maliciously locking our cloud services for ransom.

Regarding government access to data, the F-Secure CRO mentioned how surprised he was to learn how far the NSA is willing to go in order to weaken the standards we all rely upon, and speculated that direct access to providers was not a result of providers cooperation, but rather due to massive hacking attempts by the NSA. The example given was the recent finding published by “Der Spiegel” about the British Intelligence services’ hacking the Belgian Telecom Company.

Another interesting lecture regarding governments’ access to data was given by Jon Callas, co-founder of PGP and Silent Circle. This top cryptographer reviewed the different sources for surveillance: the various nations’ surveillance levels such as anti-terror, crime prospecting, and economic espionage. Non-national surveillance includes that done by criminals; corporate espionage; and companies such as Google which utilize business models to collect customer data. Callas described the efforts Silent Circle is making in order to help customers avoid different kinds of surveillance, and described the process’s two pathways: technological tools such as encryption and ammonization, and procedures and policies that will define how to safely and confidentially guard the users.

In a later panel regarding PRISM, Mr. Callas revealed the story behind the difficult decision to close Silent Circle’s secure e-mail services, immediately after they had learned that another secure e-mail provider, Lavabit, was served with a federal warrant to reveal data. Current e-mail protocol is just too difficult to secure due to email headers and metadata information saved for each e-mail, he explained.

Government access to data is not the only thing preventing the required trust in Cloud Computing. Cloud provider transparency, or lack of it, is also a major obstacle. Microsoft, Google, HP, Amazon and Adobe all presented and shared their recent efforts to provide transparency to their operation, as well as ways to increase trust. Adriana Hall from Microsoft presented the latest survey regarding Cloud Computing adoption, revealing that although most customers expressed concerns regarding the security and privacy of their data in the cloud, a majority of the companies said that security had actually improved by moving to the cloud.  In her presentation, Ms. Hall exhibited the steps Microsoft is taking in order to increase trust – including complying with different regulations, and advertising their cloud products’ development and operations control to designated Trust centers.

Similar claims came from Adobe and Google, who were very keen to present the measures they are taking in order to protect data. David Lenoe, Director of Product Security at Adobe, described his goals as good architecture, solid code and security in operations. He elaborated on some of the steps Adobe is performing in order to achieve them:  SDLC adoption and security training incorporating the martial arts style, with different colored belts given to each level of security awareness. Eran Feigenbaum, Director of Security for Google apps, said that the question is not whether the data is protected in the cloud, but whether it is protected outside of it. He presented a survey demonstrating that 60% of corporate data is located on unprotected laptops. “Cloud providers are built differently“, he explained, “their software is built for resilience, and homogeneous environments make security more robust“.

In the race for transparency and trust, standardization is a cornerstone. The amount of time dedicated in the Congress for reviewing the topics of cloud standards demonstrates how much progress has been made on this subject in the last year. During the Congress, the Cloud Security Alliance announced the launch of its new STAR certificate for cloud providers. The certification, based on ISO27001, was developed along with BSI, and is the first independent and technology-neutral certification aimed at providing more transparency to the industry.

Certification and standards are also regarded by governments as important in promoting Cloud Computing. According to Tjabbe Bos from the cloud unit of the EU commission, the EU Cloud Computing strategy’s aim is to produce 3.8 million additional jobs, and to add 950 Billion EURO to the GDP by 2020.  The way to implement the strategy, Mr. Bos added, is through three key actions:  building safe and fair contracts; establishing EU partnerships among all cloud stakeholders; and cutting through the chaos of conflicting standards and regulations.  Later on, the ENISA head of secure infrastructure and services explained how ENISA is helping the EU to achieve its cloud strategy, by formalizing standards and certification, and establishing international and national corporations. “In the Japanese tsunami disaster, the only emergency services that were able to continue operating were the cloud-based ones“, Dr. Ouzounis revealed, “and therefore we treat it as critical infrastructure and our future digital life backbone“.

From the technological point of view, the challenges that occupied the crowd were similar to last year, and included new format and use cases for encryptions, challenges for authentication and identity management, API security, and mobile and big data.

encryption

The encryption solutions presented by companies such as Brainloop and Seclore were file level encryption (IRM) tools and services aiming at providing control, access list and audit throughout the document life cycle, and sharing. IRM and file level encryption technology has been around for some time, but failed to move forward at the enterprise level. Perhaps in the cloud era this technology will succeed, due to sharing and the flexible nature of cloud services. Other identity and authentication solutions were presented by PerfectCloud and Nok Nok labs, which presented the FIDO alliance solution for Internet authentication.

It was also agreed – in a panel about the future of Cloud Computing security trends – that API security will be a central component of the security architecture. “In a world of mobile and the Internet of things, everything is API based“, said Mark O’Neill, VP of Innovation at Axway, who demonstrated in his presentation the technology of the API gateway and how they can assist organizations in future API driven attacks.

An interesting and unique new technology was presented by SkyHigh security. According to Gartner, by 2015 35% of an organization’s IT spending will not be made by the IT department (called Shadow IT), mainly due to the ease of use and ease of purchase of Cloud Computing services. This information encapsulates a great threat to the status of the CIO. SkyHigh enables the IT department to track and analyze the different cloud services used by the organization – formally and informally – and understand the potential risk associated with those services. An example of the importance of discovering and managing such services was given by Michael Mattmiller from Microsoft, who shared a story about hospital personnel using a cloud knowledge sharing service to increase productivity among them. However, when the CIO found out and examined the data uploaded to the cloud and the provider service agreement, the hospital had to report a security breach to the authorities, and suffer the consequences.

In conclusion, when comparing the 2013 Congress to the previous one last year, the feeling is that cloud services have matured considerably, although there were some minor disruptions such as PRISM. While last year the debate revolved around the advantages and reasons to move to the cloud, this year the discussions were about when and how. A great contribution was made to this process by the governments and the different standardization institutes – which understood their role in the cloud adoption process; by the providers, who generally try to listen to customers and adopt more transparent offering; and by the Cloud Security Alliance, which exhibited a quick understanding of the different crossroads ahead and invested in the right tools for enabling safer cloud adoption.

moshe-ferberBy Moshe Ferber,

Moshe is an security entrepreneur and investor. With over 20 years’ experience in information security at various industry positions.  Currently focused on Cloud Computing as board member for Cloud  alliance Israeli Chapter, public speaker on various cloud aspects and investor at Clarisite and FortyCloud – Startup companies with innovative security solutions. More information can be found at: www.onlinecloudsec.com
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Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Hybrid Cloud Environments After several years of steady cloud adoption in the enterprise, an interesting trend has emerged: More companies are retaining their existing, on-premise IT infrastructures while also embracing the latest cloud technologies. In fact, IDC predicts markets for such hybrid cloud environments will grow from the over $25 billion global market we saw…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

Cancer Moonshot In his final State of the Union address in January 2016, President Obama announced a new American “moonshot” effort: finding a cure for cancer. The term “moonshot” comes from one of America’s greatest achievements, the moon landing. If the scientific community can achieve that kind of feat, then surely it can rally around…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…