Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Virtualization As A Key Component Of Cloud Computing

Virtualization As A Key Component Of Cloud Computing

Virtualization as a key component of cloud computing

Virtualization is one of the key components of the cloud computing paradigm, especially in infrastructure as a service model where the mentioned technology is essential to provide a large set of computing resources. Some experts even define cloud computing as simple as virtualized hardware and software plus advanced monitoring and resource management technologies.

VMware

Virtualization has changed the ICT, and some of its benefits include reduction of hardware vendor lock-in, faster disaster recovery, ability to extend life of old legacy applications, and reduction of operational costs.

However, implementation of virtualization is rarely simple in enterprise environment. If you use virtualization on your machine only to run some legacy applications or have multiple operating systems available, this technology is very simple. You have to install chosen virtualization software, create/modify the image, and start to work. Even for absolute beginners, there are a lot of free online tutorials. On the other hand, if you deal with multiple database systems, complex enterprise applications where some application are on-premise and some deployed on different cloud services, the story becomes a quite different one. In the aforementioned case, you will need a great amount of computing resources and sophisticated virtualization expertise. Therefore, any initiative that freely provides computing resources, complex virtualization software, and expert knowledge is welcome.

One of the most exciting parts about working in ICT is also the ability to attend conferences where you can discuss your work and complex problems with people from your field. Currently, the budget for conferences has been reduced at many businesses. Part of solution could be virtual online conferences that enable networking opportunities without leaving your office. I’ve attended a few of these online events in the past, and my experience is positive, I have always managed to learn something useful and meet interesting people from my field.

There’s a good event coming up October 22 for anyone interested in learning more about virtualization. Online VMware Forum 2013 is free to attend, and the best part is that they offer the people capability to experiment with VMWare products free with hands on lab online. Lab is running in minutes with full technical capabilities, and at the same time you can chat live with VMware experts who can answer your questions. You can also navigate in a 3D virtual environment with interactive booths, and test the virtualization solutions without having to install anything on your machine. Attending this event you can also learn how to simplify your IT infrastructure and hear VMWare and virtualization experts’ discussions on how to find solutions to complex IT problems.

The agenda for the event include themes such as: vSphere and vCloud Suite, Virtualization Management, Virtualization 101, Cloud Management, End User Computing, Business Continuity/Disaster Recovery

You can find more information and sign-up details for this free event here.

By Darko Androcec

(Post Sponsored By VMware)

Why NSA Revelations Will Be Good For Cloud Security

Why NSA Revelations Will Be Good For Cloud Security

NSA Revelations And Cloud Security

Edward Snowden’s recent disclosures, including concerns about the NSA’s ability to break certain types of encryption, and the extent of surveillance on cloud service providers, put the entire cloud industry into an uproar.

The bad news is that this has eroded companies’  trust that their data can be secure in the cloud. In fact, industry analysts are predicting that these disclosures will cost US cloud service providers between $22 and $35 billion in revenue by 2016.

But there is light at the end of this tunnel, and what will emerge is a safer, more resilient cloud.

Is Encryption Dead?

In short, no. Expert cryptographer and author of the book “Practical Cryptography,” Bruce Schneier, recently blogged: “Whatever the NSA has up its top-secret sleeves, the mathematics of cryptography will still be the most secure part of any encryption system. I worry a lot more about poorly designed cryptographic products, software bugs, bad passwords, companies that collaborate with the NSA to leak all or part of the keys, and insecure computers and networks. Those are where the real vulnerabilities are, and where the NSA spends the bulk of its efforts.”

Even Snowden has also commented, “Properly implemented strong crypto systems are one of the few things that you can rely on.”

Consequently, we will see continued adoption of encryption technologies in the cloud to protect data in transit and at rest in these shared storage infrastructures.

Encryption will evolve

The evolution of encryption algorithms is nothing new. In recent years, as compute power gets stronger, we’ve seen the migration from DES, to 3DES, to AES-128/256. These longer key lengths are the ‘math’ that prevents computer systems from being able to ‘guess’ an encryption key.  The good news here is that as computer systems get more powerful, they can leverage encryption with longer key lengths easily, without degrading performance.

Further, encryption standards are approved by independent bodies like the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and are put up for extensive public review before they are published. While those who lean toward conspiracy theories hint at intentional ‘backdoors’ built into these algorithms that can be exploited by the NSA or others, it’s highly unlikely these wouldn’t be found during the review process. These reviews will continue to play a critical role as encryption technologies adapt in the future. Furthermore, the details and implementation of encryption algorithms, such as AES, are public domain.

The Importance of Key Management

If you use AES encryption with a 256-bit key strength, but your encryption system only uses an eight-character password to access those keys, then you effectively have reduced the strength of your encryption key significantly, since a hacker must only guess your password, instead of the actual key. This is why managing and storing these keys securely is so critical.

Threats from Abroad

Data has become a treasure trove, and the cloud can make an even sweeter target. You can be sure that if the NSA is interested in your data, others are as well. Make sure you clearly understand your cloud service provider’s (CSP) service level agreements, particularly as related to security measures. The cloud will become too cost effective to avoid for most organizations, so continued pressure from cloud clients will be the best way to gain security improvements.

Bring your own security

While many CSPs – like Google – have introduced encryption in their cloud offerings, you still need to look a bit deeper. Google’s encryption may protect you from a hacker who manages to get access to their infrastructure, but it won’t prevent Google from giving your data to the Feds. To be sure you are the only one with access to your data, use strong encryption with a good key management system, and make sure YOU keep the keys, not your CSP.

Summary

You can use the cloud, but remember that security is ultimately your responsibility.

  • Encrypt any data you put in the cloud that you want to be private.
  • Use strong crypto (for example one utilizing AES-256, RSA-2048) to protect the data.
  • Use a strong key management solution that supports multi-tenancy, strong separation and audit of administrative roles.
  • Use a key management system that you retain outside of your CSP, and that is independent of your provider.

steve-pate

By Steve Pate

Steve  co-founder and CTO of HighCloud Security, has more than 25 years of experience in designing, building, and delivering file system, operating system, and security technologies, with a proven history of converting market-changing ideas into enterprise-ready products. Before HighCloud Security, he built and led teams at ICL, SCO, VERITAS, HyTrust, Vormetric, and others. Steve has published two books on UNIX kernel internals and UNIX file systems. He earned his bachelor’s in computer science from the University of Leeds.

Dark Clouds On The Horizon: The Rise Of Sophisticated Cybercrime

Dark Clouds On The Horizon: The Rise Of Sophisticated Cybercrime

Sophisticated Cybercrime

incapsula

The story reads as if it were pulled from the pages of a Tom Clancy novel: a collection of US banks suddenly starts receiving Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that are carefully timed to re-strike just as their systems start to repair themselves. The attacks are carried out by waves of botnet zombies pouring from infected servers across the world and aimed at the United States. The main source of the outbreak is an innocent general interest website based in the UK that has been poisoned by a web design company out of Turkey. The alleged perpetrators of the attack: a shady extremist group based in the Middle East.

This, however, is not fiction. It happened in January 2013 and exists now as one of the case studies/success stories of Incapsula, (www.incapsula.com) a cloud-based website security company based in Redwood Shores, a short drive from San Francisco.

As computing technology has grown in sophistication and power over the years, so has the criminal element that seeks to exploit it. Individual interest groups, religious factions, even entire countries are at work seeking any and every weakness available inside lines of code, forms, executable files and any other seemingly innocuous paths that can lead eventually to disruption, destruction, theft and chaos.

In this case, the computers and the experts at Incapsula were able to detect and thwart the attack before any major damage occurred, but as Incapsula security analyst Ronen Atias writes in his account of the event, “this is just another demonstration of how security [on] the internet is always determined by the weakest link.” He points out that the simple mismanagement of an administrative password on the UK website was quickly exploited by the botnet shepherds in Turkey. “This is a good example,” he says, “of how we are all just a part of a shared ecosystem where website security should be a shared goal and a shared responsibility.”

Incapsula CEO Gur Shatz agrees. As a veteran security specialist and former captain in the Intelligence Corps of the Israeli Air Force, he has seen it all, and he sees the problem as growing in sophistication.

The reason for the rise in Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) is less about who the perpetrators are, and more about risk versus reward,” he says. “The inadequacies of today’s defenses, juxtaposed with the ever-rising value of the information that can be stolen, represent a huge opportunity for cybercriminals. Personal or corporate devices are a tremendous intelligence source, carrying richer and more accurate data than ever before, but protections on these devices still mostly rely on outdated technologies such as passwords.

The interconnectedness of cloud technology presents both a good news and bad news scenario when it comes to the criminal element, Shatz says. The bad news is that the interconnected nature of the cloud has increased the exposure of an organization’s infrastructure. The good news, though, is that the cloud is a much less heterogeneous environment than the jungle of personal devices (smartphones, laptops, etc.), which means that the cloud-based production environment can be made more secure much more easily than corporate networks, which is where Incapsula comes in.

Shatz points out that in general, hackers are lazy and will almost always take the easiest path to infiltrate their target. The fact that an alarmingly large number of incidents involve simple password theft indicates that this is still a major issue. However, targeted attacks on more security-conscious companies certainly require more sophisticated tools, which are readily available to cybercriminals.

When assessing a company’ risk for exposure to APTs, is common for some to take a head-in-the-sand approach, thinking, for example, “I’m not a bank, I make farm equipment, so I do not have to worry.” But Shatz points out a company without any major secrets or critical online functionality is still subject to being used as a “mule” to conduct cybercrime, as with the “Tom Clancy”  scenario mentioned earlier. “Even small online businesses such as ecommerce sites, are vulnerable,” he says, “because downtime or slowness costs them both money and reputation damage. This makes them target to DDoS extortion (which is essentially the online version of the protection racket for physical stores).” Incapsula has seen several instances of this type of attack over the past six months.

Ultimately, Shatz says, shying away from the cloud rather than risking attacks of this sort is not an option, since even if you don’t go online, your competitors will. So it’s really a question of how secure your cloud environment and web applications actually are. Various types of solutions are available from companies like Incapsula and others. But avoiding the cloud, which is equivalent to putting your head in the sand and keeping it there, is not a solution.

By Steve Prentice

Cloud Startup: Swyvel – Brings Project Management To The Cloud

Cloud Startup: Swyvel – Brings Project Management To The Cloud

Swyvel – Brings Project Management To The Cloud For Enhanced Company Productivity

swyvel

Project management, regardless of how big or how small, obviously involves many factors; from team member management and tasks management to resource management and budgeting. Effective project management starts with clear communication; though clear communication can get lost in and amongst the multiple project meetings, emails, phone conversations and more. However, if all communications were gathered together onto one platform, effective communication is enhanced immensely. Swyvel is just that platform; the software includes top of the line management elements for project managers, as well as a team member facet where team members can view their specific tasks, task time frames, level of completion and more.

Swyvel began in February of last year, though it wasn’t until November that Swyvel started offering services to those outside its beta testing group. Jeffery Potvin, CEO of Hardboot Inc., thought up Swyvel out of necessity when he experienced firsthand just how challenging it was to manage the various elements (i.e. utilizing multiple applications for project employment, team communication, etc.) of company projects. Considering Hardboot Inc. has around 150 employees and has conducted around 500 projects since its start back in 2007, it is no wonder why Mr. Potvin created such an all inclusive platform that is Swyvel.

From a management perspective, Swyvel enhances project management productivity through easy to use tools and automatic time calculations. Swyvel tools include Gantt chart capabilities, project tracking, milestone setting and tracking, as well as the ability to assign tasks to individual team members and groups and time tracking on all tasks and the project as a whole. With Swyvel, managers are also able to add notes to tasks and projects, which can be displayed privately or publically, and communicate to all or just a few team members as needed.  Further, Swyvel assists managers with easily tracking resources and budgeting. All this and more with one application really is the highlight of the startup.

As for team members, Swyvel helps keep up momentum and enthusiasm for every project by lessening email and task confusion that can occur when project tools are scattered across various platforms. When tasks are assigned, questions can be answered and progress can be tracked all in one location, team members know better what is expected of them. This can boost confidence, moral and over all enthusiasm for each project.

For a quick tour, the Swyvel team created a short clip which briefly glances over the elements of Swyvel capabilities.

Clear communication about the required tasks, deadlines and more is essential to stimulating staff members and efficiency. Swyvel is an amazing piece of software that brings all the team members together; providing an effective and efficient platform for all involved. This, of course, will save time, money and reduce typical project management challenges.

By Glenn Blake

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Data Loss

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Data Loss



data-loss

By David Fletcher

All David Fletcher comic images on this site are owned by CloudTweaks.com. If you would like to reuse them on your social media network, please feel free to do so as long as there is a clearly defined link to the original comic source. If you would like to use them in a Newsletter, Print, Powerpoint or Website. Please contact us regarding the licensing details and policies.

Online Powerhouses – Too Big to Sue?

Online Powerhouses – Too Big to Sue?

Online Powerhouses – Too Big to Sue?

Internet privacy is not just under siege from the NSA. Google is fighting two huge class action suits based upon privacy violations. Facebook recently settled two privacy-based class action lawsuits. These lawsuits are colossal because Google and Facebook are two mammoth companies with enormous numbers of customers. One class is comprised of everyone who has a Gmail account or sent a message to a GMail account over the last two years. How huge is that? The last time Google released the number of Gmail accounts was in June, 2012: 425 million worldwide. I’ve opened two myself since then.  But that’s only the number of Gmail accounts and doesn’t include everyone sending messages to Gmail accounts. Facebook boasts over 1 billion users. We mean huge.

Facebook-legal

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The second Google case is In re Google Street View Electronic Communications Litigation. This class is every person in the US whose home WiFi Google tapped to perform its street view mapping. No one knows how many people that is, but it could be in the millions.

While lawyers typically look for moneyed defendants, the problem with lawsuits of this magnitude is that each privacy violation has a statutory penalty of up to $10,000 under the Wiretap Act. When the class of plaintiffs is so large, the penalties rapidly hit billions or even trillions of dollars – that is if every class member decides to participate.

So what does this really look like? Facebook lucked out on its class action, Fraley v. Facebook, when the judge approved a settlement in August to pay each class member $15. The potential class included 150 million users but only 615,000 filed claims. Facebook paid $20 million into a settlement fund with $9,225,000 going to class members; $5,000,000 to Internet privacy watch dog groups, called cy pres awards; and $3.5 million in attorneys’ fees. So Facebook is lucky because $20 million is far less than $2.25 billion (150 million members x $15). If each class member got $1,000, more would likely have signed up and well, you can do the math.

Facebook managed to settle its next class action on the Beacon program (Let’s broadcast details about our users’ personal lives!) with a $6 million cy pres award to a privacy group Facebook controls. Clearly Facebook thought it “cracked the code” on managing its privacy problems but the case is being appealed. And what’s more, settling class actions with cy pres awards in lieu of compensating individuals is now losing favor in the 9th Circuit where Google and Facebook live.

The Google cases have been progressing through the litigation process with the plaintiffs largely winning. Even with gross revenues of $50 billion in 2012, awarding significant damages to each class member would likely bankrupt Google, leaving the claimants without payments and hundreds of millions without services.

Some commentators are arguing that the suits are “Too Big to Settle”. In the class action world, once the class is certified by the court, settlements are very difficult. What usually happens is that prior to certification, the parties come up with their proposed settlement and present it to the court for approval. Once the class is certified, it’s up to the court to define the award. If the court won’t accept a cy pres award and applies statutory damages to each class member, we are looking at staggering judgments.

It’s reminiscent of the “Too Big to Fail” arguments of the big banks and auto companies. But do they warrant it? However you feel about class action suits, shouldn’t Google and Facebook be held accountable for privacy violations even though they are so large – or because they are so large? Would the impact of Google’s or Facebook’s demise be similar to bringing down the banking system or the auto industry? Or would the Internet ecosystem hiccup and move on?

The U.S. Supreme Court should announce if they will take the appeal of the Beacon Facebook class action and its cy pres award on Monday. Any bets?

By Cindy Wolf

Cindy is a Colorado lawyer with more than 25 years experience representing large and small domestic and multinational companies. Her expertise is in helping companies enter the cloud safely, either as providers or users. She also practices in the areas of corporate law and commercial contracting, with an emphasis on international issues. She can be reached at cindy@cindywolf.com. 

(Note: This publication is provided for informational purposes only. It does not constitute legal advice. There is no implicit guarantee that this information is correct, complete, or up to date. This publication is not intended to and does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the author.)

JPMorgan Chase Inducts VMTurbo Into Hall Of Innovation

JPMorgan Chase Inducts VMTurbo Into Hall Of Innovation

JPMorgan Chase Inducts VMTurbo into Hall of Innovation

VMTurbo Enables JPMorgan Chase to Increase Virtual Machine Density Without Impacting Workload Performance

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–VMTurbo, provider of the only software-defined control system for businesses running mission-critical applications on virtualized and cloud infrastructures, today announced that JPMorgan Chase & Co. inducted VMTurbo into the Hall of Innovation for its technology contributions in their global technology infrastructure.

The IT Executive Team at JPMorgan Chase recognized VMTurbo for the impact its technology has made on the business and the disruptive nature of its technology. VMTurbo was honored with the award at the 5th Annual J.P. Morgan Technology Innovation Symposium on Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at the Rosewood Sand Hill in Menlo Park.

VMTurbo’s technology is helping JPMorgan Chase optimize the utilization of virtual environments and thereby supporting a move from reactive to predictive workload management,” said George Sherman, Head of Compute Services at JPMorgan Chase. “Automation will enable our support teams to focus on higher value activity by preventing incidents and dynamically optimizing virtual environments.”

image-tech-validate

Through the Hall of Innovation, JPMorgan Chase is happy to recognize emerging technology companies that are helping us deliver differentiated technology solutions,” said Larry Feinsmith, Head of Technology Strategy and Partnership Development within the Office of the CIO at JPMorgan Chase. “We continue to experience significant value through our engagement with early stage companies like VMTurbo, and our relationship has been mutually beneficial to help develop their offering to meet the technology needs of large enterprises.

First launched in 2010, VMTurbo’s Operation Manager is now used by more than 9,000 enterprises and cloud service providers worldwide, including JPMorgan Chase. Deploying VMTurbo contributes to IT staff productivity savings of up to 20 percent and improvements in resource utilization of 20 to 40 percent – which converts to significant operational and capital expenditure benefits. 89 percent of VMTurbo customers surveyed realized value within three months of deploying VMTurbo, with 25 percent realizing immediate value within three days of deployment.

JPMorgan Chase’s selection of VMTurbo to proactively manage their VMware environment is a testament to the strength of our solution,” said VMTurbo CEO Ben Nye. “Working together, we have successfully helped them transition from allocation-based to utilization-based capacity management, thus allowing their IT staff to fully optimize their operations and IT investments across the organization.”

VMTurbo believes that software-driven control of virtualized and cloud environments to assure workload performance while utilizing virtual and cloud infrastructure assets as efficiently as possible is the future of IT as a service,” said VMTurbo founder and president Shmuel Kliger. “This recognition by JPMorgan Chase underscores the market need for a solution that transforms IT Operations.” 

About VMTurbo

VMTurbo provides the only software-defined control system for businesses running mission-critical applications on virtualized or cloud infrastructure. The Company applies proven economic principles to deliver a control system that continuously ensures performance while maximizing utilization to transform IT operations to scale to the complexities and dynamics of a software-defined world. First launched in 2010, the VMTurbo platform is now used by more than 9,000 enterprises and cloud service providers worldwide, including Société Générale, BMO Financial, Xerox Corporation, Reed Elsevier, H&M, BT, CSC and KPN. VMTurbo is headquartered in Massachusetts, with offices in New York, California, the United Kingdom and Israel. For more information, visit us at www.vmturbo.com. 

About JPMorgan Chase & Co.

JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) is a leading global financial services firm with assets of $2.5 trillion and operations worldwide. The Firm is a leader in investment banking, financial services for consumers and small business, commercial banking, financial transaction processing, asset management and private equity. A component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, JPMorgan Chase & Co. serves millions of consumers in the United States and many of the world’s most prominent corporate, institutional and government clients under its J.P. Morgan and Chase brands. Information about JPMorgan Chase & Co. is available at www.jpmorganchase.com.

Image Source: TechValidate

Cloud Computing Bottleneck: The Bandwidth Problem

Cloud Computing Bottleneck: The Bandwidth Problem

Cloud Computing Bottleneck: The Bandwidth Problem

Though Cloud Computing looks to be the future of application and data delivery for the foreseeable future, it is not without its downsides and bottlenecks, literally. The most evident bottleneck you will notice is bandwidth. It is the end-all-be-all of connectivity. Without it, or even just having small portions of it is enough to cause headaches in even the most undemanding user. Imagine that for a casual user, uploading a small Word document as an traffic-bottleneckattachment to an email taking more than a minute or two is cause for a fit of rage. Now think if this is an administrator trying to upload an automated security fix for a distributed software network that is needed urgently, and you would probably see CDs and small tabletop objects fly around the room. I might be exaggerating about the reactions, but the feeling one gets with slow uploads is all too real. This is the same problem with communication in between remote data centers being used in Cloud Computing. If they cannot communicate with each other fast enough, the applications being used by users everywhere will experience some great deal of slowdown.

This apparent slowdown is often felt by organizations who switched from local networked applications to cloud-based applications. This is not inherent to Cloud Computing, but rather a miscalculation on the side of whoever designed the system. The designer has been too caught up in the interconnectivity of all elements, and neglects to take into consideration the real world performance of the systems that will be used, one of the most important of which is fast data connection and a large bandwidth.

According to Tom Conophy, CIO of InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG), “If your employees and your users can’t access data fast enough, then the cloud will be nothing but a pipe dream.” This is especially true in institutions where passing and retrieving of data is essential, like in the booking systems of hotels and travel agencies. And it is these types of organizations who are in need of a single globally interconnected system that can only be made possible through cloud computing. And for it to be successful, the interconnectivity part must step up to the challenge.

To put the bandwidth bottleneck into perspective, imagine you are in a Skype video call that is choppy and just overall bad even though both of you have fast internet connections. The problem in this case is definitely the interconnectivity between your ISPs, there might not be enough bandwidth in the backbone that connects your two geographically separated networks.

This is the potential problem being faced by systems like Google Glass. For it to give the user a proper experience, both upload and download of data has to be equally good or else what the people tuning in to the Google Glass video will simply be a series of still pictures and vice versa. Bandwidth is definitely a commodity which is not in abundance.

By Abdul Salam

CloudTweaks Comics
10 Trending US Cities For Tech Jobs And Startups

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Big Data – Top Critical Technology Trend For The Next Five Years

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Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

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4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

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Cloud Computing Then & Now

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The Evolving Cloud  From as early as the onset of modern computing, the possibility of resource distribution has been explored. Today’s cloud computing environment goes well beyond what most could even have imagined at the birth of modern computing and innovation in the field isn’t slowing. A Brief History Matillion’s interactive timeline of cloud begins…

Do Small Businesses Need Cloud Storage Service?

Do Small Businesses Need Cloud Storage Service?

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Cloud Infographic – Interesting Big Data Facts

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What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

The Questions of Privacy In The Internet of Things Revolution

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Privacy in the Internet of Things Revolution The Internet of Things (IoT) has been promising a lot to consumers for a few years and now we’re really starting to see some of the big ideas come to fruition, which means an ever-growing conversation around data security and privacy. Big data comes with big responsibilities and…

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Big Data Continues To Grow Big Data continues to be a much discussed topic of interest and for good reason.  According to a recent report from International Data Corporation (IDC), “worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics will grow from nearly $122 billion in 2015 to more than $187 billion in 2019, an increase…

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

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Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

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Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

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Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

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The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

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Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

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The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

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Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

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Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

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