Category Archives: Cloud Computing

LeEco: Cloud Ecosystem of Content and Devices

LeEco: Cloud Ecosystem of Content and Devices

LeEco US Launch

LeEco officially launched its disruptive ecosystem model in the U.S., which breaks boundaries between screens to seamlessly deliver content and services on a wide array of connected smart devices – including smartphones, TVs, smart bikes, virtual reality and electric self-driving vehicles

It is really tough to overstate the vast scale and ambition of LeEco. The basic concept is quite simple, they want to create an ecosystem of content and devices that can be used together seamlessly to connect you together with all your devices. Today they unveiled a brand new Smartphone, Smart TV, VR Headset, Android Powered Smart Bike, and Autonomous Electric Car (all in a day’s work).

“No other company in the world can do this. Not Apple, not Samsung, Amazon, Google, or Telsa”  boasted Danny Bowman, Chief Revenue Officer.

Every month, LeEco’s online video streaming service,, garners 730 million unique visitors (that’s more than double the population of the USA) and they are here to take on the US market. This had been touted as a rivalry to Netflix, but really this is a challenge to Western tech giants like Apple, Google, and Amazon. With the User Planning to User (UP2U™) program LeEco promises an integrated cross platform system, built by and for the users – With UP2U, you are LeEco”.

LeEco are focused on the idea that the user is the foundation of everything. They pioneer a user-first philosophy that works to create a more seamless and unified experience that unites all devices. They are driven by their vertically integrated EUI that incorporates user, hardware, software and content, breaking down barriers between devices and operating systems for a truly integrated experience.

LeEco’s Ecosystem User Interface (EUI) aims to unify their ecosystem with two core principles: breaking device boundaries and putting content at the heart of the experience. In the real world this means you can cast content from your phone to your car with a simple swipe or receive notifications from your Smart Bike to your TV. EUI allows you to move your experience from one device to another; your content will always be available at a touch of a button, regardless of which device you are using.

The Ecosystem incorporates these devices along with Le Cloud (the cloud-based backbone powering LeEco’s multiple screens, smart devices and content), Le Vision Pictures and Le Vision Entertainment (one of Chinas 3 largest film studios – they are currently producing The Great Wall starring Matt Damon), Le Music (LeEco’s online live-streaming music platform and production company), Le Sports (China’s leading Internet-based eco-sports company) and Le TV (the television arm of LeEco).

At the heart of LeEco, and all this incredible integration, is what has driven LeEco from the very beginning; content. For content in the U.S., LeEco has partnered with top content providers including Lionsgate, MGM, Showtime, Vice Media, Awesomeness TV, A+E, with others being continually added. Combined with the power of content creation via Le Vision Entertainment, I have no doubt that they will soon come to rival Netflix as one of the best streaming services in the world.

LeEco has the potential to truly revolutionise integrated tech and Smart Homes. Taking on tech giants like Apple and Google in creating integrated and intuitive content and services across a wide range of devices. This is different as well though; there is no company out there that provides such a wide range of cross platform and device integration. With a competitive price structure (a 43-inch Eco Smart TV with 3-month free EcoPass membership costing $649) that is aimed at offering their service to a mass audience, they will force Apple, Google and others to not only compete technologically, but in value for money as well. Time will tell whether LeEco will have the same success in the US that they enjoyed in China, but I would back them all the way.

By Josh Hamilton

Politics 2.0: The Age of Cyber-Political Warfare

Politics 2.0: The Age of Cyber-Political Warfare

Cyber-Political Warfare

Do you remember the last time hackers and cybercriminals determined the outcome of a presidential race? Of course not, because it’s never happened. It could happen now. Without even thinking about it, we’ve slipped into a new era. I would dub this the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare. This playing-field is thick with espionage, and it’s dominated by people who have little to no political clout. Instead, they have technical know-how.

It’s common knowledge that the internet is rife with identity theft. Social profiles, email, ecommerce sites, and mobile devices all provide excellent avenues for cyber-thieves. Oftentimes, it doesn’t take hacking skills to get information. The Snapchat employees who had their information stolen were victims of an email phishing scam. All the thief had to do was pretend to be Snapchat’s CEO and ask a single employee for payroll data.


In the case of Hillary Clinton, it wasn’t hard for a cybercriminal to reveal her email activities. Data security firm Kroll points out that the revelation didn’t even technically involve hacking. Rather, it’s a high-profile case of a compromised account. The compromiser, ‘Guccifer’ Marcel Lehel Lazar, used Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) to find out personal information about Sydney Blumenthal, who is a Clinton confidant. He used Open Source information to figure out Blumenthal’s email password. From there, he discovered Clinton was using a private server to email Blumenthal. Then, Guccifer published Clinton’s private email info online.

Guccifer was sentenced to four years in prison. Is that enough to deter an onlooker from copying his crimes? Apparently not, because Guccifer 2.0 has surfaced to release more stolen information. According to the original Guccifer, this kind of digital detective work is “easy… easy for me, for everybody.” Everybody can hunt down information that could potentially determine the result of a political election. This puts a brand new kind of power in the hands of the many. Anyone smart enough to follow trails of data online can be a player in the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare.

The biggest player here is Russia. The White House is certain that Russia’s state-sponsored hackers compromised Democratic National Committee email accounts, with the intent of influencing the election. Secureworks reports that the hackers used a phishing scam. They made it look like members of the Clinton campaign and the DNC were logging into Gmail accounts. The login page was fake, and through it the hackers gained login data. Reportedly, Russian hacking group Fancy Bear used Bitly to setup the malicious URLs, which read ‘’ instead of Now Bitly isn’t just a customer experience platform and IBM partner. It’s an unwitting tool in the hands of malicious hackers.

Obama promised a proportional response to the hacks. What would cyberwar with Russia look like? If a ‘proportional response’ is coming, we’ll see the release of inside information about Vladimir Putin or other high-ranking Russian officials. But how this would influence Russian politics, no one can be sure. Russia could merely cite our desire to get revenge and brush any sort of leaks off as petty attempts to disparage Russian officials.

One thing is clear: to be a politician now, you have to be, at minimum, cognizant of cyber threats. While American politics is stuck in the binary of red vs. blue, the fluid and fast world of the web is a much more complex place. It’s a place where people wheel-and-deal on a multinational level. It’s a powerful place to reach people and to access their data. Politicians want to use the internet as a tool, but by doing so they’re placing their data and their information at risk. In the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare, that data will continue to be a weapon for invisible and powerful opponents.

By Daniel Matthews

Ouissam Youssef: The Value of a Vertical Market Orientation

Ouissam Youssef: The Value of a Vertical Market Orientation

Vertical Market Orientation

Sponsored series by the Valsef Group

Vertical markets supply products and services to a specific industry (i.e. banking, real estate, insurance) with precise user specifications, and thus vertical market software offers developments for niche applications which are already customized to serve their target market. Typically the competition in these markets is smaller as only a few organizations with the requisite skills will spend the time and effort developing such intricate constructions; this serves as both opportunity and risk since a worthy product will find a loyal customer base, but if not adequately serviced these same customers could mean complete ruin.

Targeted Solutions

Technology offers us a host of horizontal market services and platforms from email solutions to marketing platform to bookkeeping software. They’re necessary for every business venture and with their global market it’s unsurprising that such products exist in the multitudes. Many of these horizontal market services are becoming highly customizable and are in some cases even tailored to the clients who use them but many specialists still maintain that the solutions possible with vertical market software surpass any one-size-fits-all product. Says Ouissam Youssef, founder and CEO of Valsef Capital, “What makes vertical market software so interesting to us is that generally big companies, and thus big R&D dollars, tend to shy away from vertical markets because they’re too small to warrant the investment. This creates a situation where a company can operate profitably without the constant influx of ‘irrational money’ attacking it. It is not uncommon to run across VMS companies that have average client tenures over ten to fifteen years.”

Entering a Vertical Market


The targeted solutions of vertical market software can be lucrative investments but only with the necessary groundwork and infrastructure. A substantial amount of sales and marketing investment is required, along with the core skills able to create a valuable product. Without a high level of experience and expertise in an industry, it’s unlikely a product will thrive in a vertical market, just as without the sales teams that understand both the technology and its role such software is unlikely to find a foothold.

There are, however, a few key practices which can assist. For starters, it’s necessary to have a grasp of the existing industry exposure. Certain industry segments are already highly diluted with vertical market software while others have too often been looked over. Concentrating on a segment with greater demand than supply is just good business sense. However, finding a market with high demand is not enough. The long-term prospects of any vertical need to be understood for an investment that’s going to grow. Finding such a market with both demand and longevity is a veritable recipe for success. Once the relevant niche has been targeted it’s crucial to provide the essential resources and commitment to a product. Operational excellence and networking shape customer loyalty and make it that much more difficult for future competitors to enter the same market.

Wise Investments

Valsef Group, a technology investment group with the aim to grow both capital investment and the companies they back, invests in vertical market software companies via Valsoft Corp. Investing in stable businesses and fostering an entrepreneurial environment post-acquisition, the group cultivates such investments into industry leaders with an eye to long-term partnerships and lasting reward. Says Youssef, “We at Valsoft invest with a 40 year time horizon; we feel that differentiates us in this day and age. We look for companies that will withstand the test of time. We find there tends to be quite a few of those in the VMS business and that’s why we’re in it; there are many businesses worth taking care of.”

By Jennifer Klostermann

Infographic: Report Finds Public Wi-Fi Usage Trumps Security Concerns

Infographic: Report Finds Public Wi-Fi Usage Trumps Security Concerns

Xirrus Report

As cyber threats, like ransomware, get more sophisticated, the number of victims and methods of attacks will only increase,” said Morgan Wright, cyber security expert and senior fellow at The Center for Digital Government. “Businesses not only have a corporate responsibility to educate their users of the risks associated with connecting to public Wi-Fi, but also to give them the necessary tools to avoid attacks.”

The study reveals the growing disparity between the increased use of public Wi-Fi and the lack of precaution taken against security threats when connecting.

Key findings include:

  • 48 percent of Wi-Fi users connect to public Wi-Fi at least three times per week; 31 percent connect to public Wi-Fi every day.
  • 91 percent of Wi-Fi users do not believe public Wi-Fi is secure, yet 89 percent use it anyway.
  • When on public Wi-Fi, 83 percent of Wi-Fi users access their email, whether it’s for work or personal reasons, and 43 percent access work/job specific information.
  • Nearly half (46 percent) of Wi-Fi users say their company has not offered cyber security training in the past year.
  • Nearly 30 percent of respondents are not aware of ransomware as a threat, despite it being identified as one of the most pervasive cyber threats.


(Infographic Source: Xirrus via Marketwired)

Useful SaaS Tools For Marketers

Useful SaaS Tools For Marketers

SaaS Tools For Marketers

Growth hacking really isn’t much more than a modern form of marketing, but with the renewal of the designation comes a few other significant changes. For starters, growth hackers are more often found in startups with small budgets and big ideas. Since startups are typically high-risk organizations with the potential for prodigious growth, growth hacking tools (extensive list) are often viewed as performing tremendously effectively, particularly when contrasted with the low costs involved. Of course, the flip side is that ineffective tools aren’t given a second thought, are simply disregarded, and tend not to affect the positive opinion of the growth hacking arena. Fortunately, the confidence in these new age marketing tools has encouraged a better breed of amenities which are developing the marketing framework of every organization bold enough to advance. Here’s a look at some of the top tools for a few principal marketing fields.


Generating Leads & Growing Your Customer Base


Increase customer engagement and interaction through this experimentation platform. By keeping track of the changing behaviors of your customers, it’s possible to increase revenue, better engage customers through captivating experiences, and charm loyal users. Optimizely makes it possible to accomplish a host of site optimizations in just a few minutes and offers a free trial to get you started.

Bounce Exchange

Using Exit Intent technology, Bounce Exchange helps you grab visitors as they leave with invitations that help “turn abandoning visitors into valuable customer.


For real customer information that connects data to real users, KISSmetrics lets you track and analyze customer behavior for a higher visitor to customer conversion rate. Easy to set up and with a free trial to get you hooked.

Increasing Traffic & Participation

Helping businesses find opportunities on social networks and in search engines, offers a free trial to assess their value before agreeing to one of their paid plans. This smart tool helps organizations seek out conversations about their brand, products, services or competitors, and through participation in Google-crawled places boosts SEO and brand positioning.


A free tool for product promotion, Twilighter encourages the sharing of content for increased visitors to your site. Site visitors can easily highlight content and immediately share via Twitter without any hassle. And let’s be realistic, in today’s world of automated apps and low attention spans, you’ve got to keep it effortless. As a bonus, Twilighter highlights the most popular content on your site for new visitors.

Automate Your Marketing


All-in-one automated sales and marketing software that helps organizations stay in touch and follow up automatically via social marketing and email. Infusionsoft promises increased leads, greater conversion rates, and better management of sales processes.

Email Marketing


A free plugin that makes the acquisition of email subscribers quick and easy, ListBuilder works on both desktop and mobile, integrates with services like MailChimp, and provides ‘smart popup mode’ prompts for discreet email collection.


A popular email marketing tool that lets you send targeted emails based on site activity, provides optimal send time recommendations based on past performance, and segments your mailing list. With e-commerce integration and a host of features that help businesses thrive, MailChimp is definitely worth a look.

Research & Feedback


Putting analytics to use, Qualaroo makes it easy to survey site visitors for qualitative information that gives a better picture of who your customers are and what they want. Available for both desktop or mobile visitors.


Connect with site visitors through the Olark chat application. You’ll know who’s on your site, where they’re located, and what they have and are looking at on your website so as to connect with them in the most meaningful way. Integration with major CRMs and handy customization features round off this choice tool nicely.

Just the very tip of the modern marketing tools iceberg; if you can imagine it, someone’s probably developed the tool you need… and many others you haven’t yet conceived.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Next Wave of Cloud Computing: Artificial Intelligence?

The Next Wave of Cloud Computing: Artificial Intelligence?

Cloud Computing and Artificial Intelligence

Over the past few years, cloud computing has been evolving at a rapid rate. It is becoming the norm in today’s software solutions. Forrester believes that that cloud computing will be a $191 billion market by 2020. According to the 2016 State of Cloud Survey conducted by RightScale, 96% of its respondents are using the cloud, with more enterprise workloads shifting towards public and private clouds. Adoption in both hybrid cloud and DevOps have gone up as well.


The AI-Cloud Landscape

So where could the cloud computing market be headed next? Could the next wave of cloud computing involve artificial intelligence? It certainly appears that way. In a market that is primarily dominated by four major companies – Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and IBM – AI could possibly disrupt the current dynamic.

In the past few years, there has been a surge of investment in AI capabilities in cloud platforms. The big four (Google, Microsoft, Amazon and IBM) are making huge strides in the AI world. Microsoft is currently offering more than twenty cognitive services such as language comprehension and analyzing images. Last year, Amazon’s cloud division added an AI service which lets people add analytical and predictive capabilities to their applications.

The current AI-cloud landscape can essentially be categorized into two groups: AI cloud services and cloud machine learning platforms.

AI Cloud Services

Example of AI cloud services involve technologies such as Microsoft Cognitive Services, Google Cloud Vision, and IBM Watson. In this type of model, organizations incorporate AI capabilities in applications without having to invest in expensive AI infrastructures.

Cloud Machine Learning Platforms

On the flip slide, there are cloud machine learning platforms. Machine learning is a method of data analysis which automates analytical model building. It enables for computers to find patterns automatically as well as areas of importance. Azure Machine Learning and AWS Machine Learning are examples of cloud machine learning platforms.

IBM and Google Making Waves


Recently IBM and Google having been making news in the AI realm and it reflects a shift within the tech industry towards deep learning. Just last month, IBM unveiled Project DataWorks, which is supposedly an industry first. It is a cloud-based data and analytics platform which can integrate different types of data and enable AI-powered decision making. The platform provides an environment for collaboration between business users and data professionals. Using technologies like Pixiedust and Brunel, users can create data visualizations with very minimal coding, allowing everyone in the business to gain insights at first look.

Earlier this month at an event in San Francisco, Google unveiled a family of cloud computing services which would allow any developer or business to use machine learning technologies that fuel some of Google’s most powerful services. This move is an attempt by Google to get a bigger foothold in the cloud computing market.

AI-First Cloud

According to Sundar Pichai, chief executive of Google, computing is evolving from a mobile-first to an AI-first world. So what would a next-generation AI-first cloud like? Simply put, it would be one built around AI capabilities. In the upcoming years, we could possibly see AI being key in improving cloud services such as computing and storage. The next wave of cloud computing platforms could also see integrations between AI and the existing catalog of cloud services, such as Paas or SaaS.

It remains to be seen whether AI can disrupt the current cloud computing market, but it will definitely influence and inspire a new wave of cloud computing platforms.

By Joya Scarlata

Where Are Your Users Learning About The Birds And The Bees Of Cloud?

Where Are Your Users Learning About The Birds And The Bees Of Cloud?

Clouding Around

Where did you learn about the birds and bees – from your adolescent peers? How did that work out for accuracy? Today it’s from peers and the Internet. The same is true for your users and the cloud with the same sometimes disastrous consequences. You’re the CIO, shouldn’t they be learning cloud from you? Stop lamenting like Rodney Dangerfield how IT gets no respect. Step up and reach out.

Cloud use is spreading rapidly but most of your users have a vague or misguided concept of what cloud really is and its promises and pitfalls. Want proof? Often quoted are Gartner’s Top Ten Cloud Myths. But that is just scratching the service. A little digging reveals lots of misconceptions about SaaS, like here and here. Even your peers on the management committee hold foggy notions of how it works but are reluctant to admit it. Instead, they echo some of the buzzwords, quote an article they read in the WSJ, etc. Let’s face it. Your firm is already pregnant with cloud. Why not take a page from what your peers do and get ahead of the curve.

Your head of HR works hard at building and executing an education program for the company’s staff. It’s designed to encompass the many different facets of management and leadership to facilitate employees’ progress. It also points out all the policies and laws that need compliance. Attendance and regular testing is mandatory and for good reason. To grow, your firm needs knowledgeable leadership and a strong culture. To stay out of trouble, employees need to understand the firm’s and society’s norms and boundaries.


Your CFO does the same. Folks are regularly exposed and held accountable to the business metrics and methodologies used to manage and steer the enterprise. The how and why you do what you do is critical for staff to understand, if the firm is going to reach its goals. Likewise, there are a lot of regulations where compliance is essential. They range from those covering all businesses, like SOX or FCPA, to those that are industry specific, like HIPAA or Dodd-Frank.

It’s a good bet that your operations, marketing, and other functions in the company do the same: provide development and tools for success while also pointing out the guard-rails between which actions can be taken in accord with company culture and society norms.

What are you doing for IT leadership? Let’s guess. Odds are you focus on the guardrails. You teach them good passwords, how to avoid phishing emails, perform safe browsing, use corporate data on their mobile devices, etc. All worthy topics but that’s not the half of it. As the fundamentals of your business become increasingly digital they are spending buckets of money on cloud computing. Who is teaching them about cloud? Who is helping the company’s staff make good decisions and avoid bear traps in cloud?

Safe bet it is not you. SaaS vendors go right around you directly to them. Their peers and buddies during meetings and conferences buzz about the latest cloud-based tool – and it’s even free to try! You turn around and surprise, everyone is on and they are asking you to link it to your old Oracle order management system.

Why not get ahead of the curve and emulate your peers. Teach your users about cloud. Give them the basics, dispel the myths and paint relevant case studies to your industry and environment. Give them the big picture, too. Cloud is pretty prominent in the press these days: all the way from how everyone can use it to how it is transforming whole industries.

NetSuite is bought by Oracle. elects to use AWS. Workday announces they will use IBM’s cloud for development. Is any of this relevant for your enterprise? Why not write a short note to all users or a post on your internal social media giving your point of view? Are you too busy to write something? Send a link to an article of blog post you particularly liked.

Make yourself the “go to” guy when different parts of the company contemplate using cloud. Do it for the company and do it for you. The CIO and IT’s role are changing and you need to negotiate a difficult path. Some even predict the CIO position will disappear. Nothing is certain but wouldn’t it be better if your users viewed you as a valuable and essential member of the team?

(Originally published Oct 13th, 2016. You can periodically read John’s syndicated articles here on CloudTweaks. Contact us for more information on these programs)

By John Pientka

Effective Security Management In A Software Defined World

Effective Security Management In A Software Defined World

Effective Security Management

Software defined infrastructure (SDx) along with use of private and public cloud technology is completely changing the way IT departments manage enterprise data centers and application workloads. Automation is a key component of software defined networking (SDN), bringing network, server, storage, security management and other IT functional teams together to transform the data center from a hardware-focused to an application-focused environment.

In the past when organizations deployed new applications, the application owner needed to collaborate with several disparate teams. For example: one team was responsible for installing the required server hardware and operating systems, another team was responsible for connecting the new servers to the network, and yet another team was responsible for provisioning the security and firewall rules.


It was as if the stars, planets and moons (or in this case all the functional teams) had to align in order for all of the necessary components to be provisioned. Then, and only then, could the application owners’ start using the new infrastructure. The result of all these tasks was it would take weeks or even months before the infrastructure was ready and the new application could start to be rolled out.

Today, private and public cloud infrastructures allow IT to automate these manually intensive operations; virtual machines are dynamically created and deployed, operating systems are quickly and easily provisioned, and connecting new services to the network is streamlined and automatic. As a result, pre-configured templates of commonly used and well defined services are available to the application owner. With a single click on a self-service portal, applications can now be quickly provisioned across multiple data centers, within or among private and public clouds.

In this software defined world where new apps are instantly created or moved to a different location as the infrastructure gets provisioned, changed and elastically scaled based on demand, security officers are challenged to enforce security policies and retain full visibility of security incidents. In fact, security often lags far behind the application developer’s ability to provision new infrastructure since traditional security controls remain fixed at protecting the network perimeter and don’t easily extend into the highly dynamic and automated software defined infrastructure. As such, security remains a key challenge for organizations looking to get full visibility and control of their threat landscape and plug any vulnerabilities in their cloud-based environments.

It turns out the keys to getting control back are creating dynamic security policies, API scoping and security management consolidation.

Creating Dynamic Security Policies

Dynamic security policies in modern networks are achieved by close integration with network virtualization and public IaaS solutions like VMware NSX, Cisco ACI, OpenStack, AWS or Microsoft Azure. By tightly integrating with these solutions, objects defined by those systems such as groups and tags can be learned and utilized in network security policies. This allows for the creation of dynamic security policies where changes in the software-defined environment are immediately translated and instantly reflected into an effective and active security policy that is applied to all traffic automatically – without human intervention.


Exposed or published APIs in popular SDN or cloud services controllers provides the logical integration point for creating dynamic security policies. Data defined by the controller – such security groups, VM or host names, tags, and more – can be exchanged with network security tools to create meaningful context for both security personnel and network administrators. Now, instead of arbitrary or meaningless IP addresses, the security in a software-defined network can leverage meaningful information about the network to ensure the right policies always follow application data and workloads – wherever they go.

Additionally, leveraging and populating this contextual information in log files gives security admins the ability to better understand and investigate any security incident. Security solutions for cloud-based networks must be able to integrate with leading cloud and network virtualization tools to not only provide advanced threat protection for both east-west and north-south traffic but also make use of dynamic cloud and other SDN objects in the security policy and logs for effective security management.

API scoping

In order to completely automate the deployment of new applications, organizations need to grant developer’s access to APIs that in many cases involve modification of security policies. It is vital to ensure this access is scoped or limited appropriately; otherwise, a mistake by a developer could potentially alter the security policy of the entire organization making it vulnerable to threats.

Scoping access to APIs example:

The printer admin use an app to add printers to the network. In doing so, this involves modifying firewall rules using an API. The security policy must ensure that the printer application can only add new printers – nothing else – and is only permitted within relevant network segments.

Incorporating sub policies in the security management solution is the best way to allow scoping API access down to a rule level, thus eliminating the possibility of inadvertently modifying the security posture and exposing the entire organization to new threats. This also ensures delegation of administrative duties down to specific use cases to streamline security management while maintaining oversight of all activities.

Security Management Consolidation

Consolidation of management functions is necessary to gain complete and holistic visibility of security policies and incidents across the entire organization’s infrastructure. Without management consolidation incidents are difficult to identify, correlate and analyze across the various cloud networks, making it operationally impossible to secure these environments.

The new software-defined infrastructure is complex, constantly changing and being driven by functional teams who don’t always understand the security implications that come from defining new infrastructure. In addition, organizations still have physical or legacy networks to maintain. It is now more difficult than ever to get a handle on not only where data center traffic goes – north-south, east-west, virtual and physical, private and public cloud – but how exposed an organization’s infrastructure is to vulnerabilities and threats.

Cloud-based security solutions must be able to provide customers with a unified solution that consolidates policy management, visibility and reporting across private and public clouds – all from a single pane of glass. It should be intuitive and scalable enough to handle security deployments wherever customer data goes while providing detailed analysis and correlation of security events across the entire enterprise network.

By Yoav Shay Daniely

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Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…


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