Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Upwork Causes Stir In Freelance Community Due To New Pricing

Upwork Causes Stir In Freelance Community Due To New Pricing

Upwork SaaS Freelance Marketplace

Upwork, one of the largest global platforms supporting freelance work, has made a significant change to their terms of service that has a lot of users, both client- and freelancer-side, in an uproar. At the end of 2013, Elance and oDesk, two of the largest freelancing marketplaces on the web, announced a merger, and in 2015 the company relaunched under the name Upwork. Though the oDesk platform was rebranded as Upwork, Elance continued to run its old platform, while encouraging users to move to the Upwork platform. It’s taken about a year for everything to pull together, but the beginning of this year saw the final move of all clients, freelancers, and work portfolios from the old Elance platform to the amalgamated Upwork platform.

Moving Towards a Freelancing & Remote Working Culture


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Thanks to many advances in technology in recent years, freelancing and remote working have become viable and profitable options for many, and while freelancers in years gone by might have struggled to find new clients, platforms connecting job hunters with employers have improved their prospects. According to the Freelancer Union report, 34% of the national US workforce is doing freelance work, contributing an estimated $715 billion to the economy. The majority of freelancers believe that freelancing prospects are improving, and 32% of freelancers surveyed have experienced an increase in demand over the past year. Income stability and finding work, however, are the top barriers reported to performing additional freelance work, and it’s significant that 69% of freelancers believe technology helps them find this additional work. To date, Upwork has been a significant part of this technology.

The Terms of Service Furor

Before the Upwork rebranding, oDesk charged fees slightly higher than Elance’s fees, and so with the rebranding, Upwork continued the fee structure of oDesk, while Elancers continued using the slightly lower fee structure of the Elance platform. The final move therefore of clients and freelancers from the Elance platform to the Upwork platform caused some grumbling, but it was a move long in the works, and so it seems the community accepted the change rather peacefully. However, the new terms of service released by Upwork, due to come into effect in early June, is causing much criticism in the freelancing community.

Freelancers who had previously been charged a flat 10% commission on all jobs won through the Upwork platform will now be charged commission on a sliding scale. Those earning less than $500 per month will pay 20% commission, earning between $500.01 and $10,000 will pay 10% commission, and top earnings billing in excess of $10,000 will pay only 5% commission. And clients have also been hit with additional fees. Apparently in efforts to offset high payment servicing costs, a processing fee of 2.75% per payment or flat $25 monthly fee will be charged to clients.

The internet community has quickly made their thoughts known, and in typical fashion dissatisfaction is most loudly stated. Clients, freelancers, and general commentators have expressed anger and disappointment at the changes, though a few savvy Twitter members are using the trend in #Upwork to source new business outside of the platform.

Future Alternatives?


The advantages of freelancing and remote working are flexibility in working hours and locations, self-management, the potential for greater income, and additional tax deductions. Of course, the disadvantages also merit thought. Working freelance you’ll typically need to earn more than you would working a standard desk job because you have to pay for all of the benefits you’d receive working in-house. You’re also responsible for a far wider range of tasks; you are your own micro business responsible for all of the accounting, management, and operational functions. Cash flow tends to be inconsistent, you have to actively search for work, and at the end of the day, you are the solely responsible party for all successes and failures. Though some in the freelance marketplace have expressed criticism and general pessimism for the online buyer/seller market as a whole, if after weighing up the pros and cons you still believe freelancing is for you, then go for it.

Over the next 12-18 months we firmly believe that many new competitors will spring into action in order to chip away at the Upwork market share. Where it stands now based on the online responses, this won’t be difficult.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Multi Cloud Approach

The Multi Cloud Approach

The Multi Cloud

The multi-cloud approach, spreading cloud apps across different service providers, is a new trend that might compete or integrate with hybrid cloud, depending on how users and providers choose to implement it. Though business leaders readily accept the need for cloud adoption with its reduced CapEx disbursement and speedy access to the best and latest resources, many fear locking themselves into a single service provider. Others make use of multiple providers in an attempt to reduce latency problems, and some prefer to pick and choose the most relevant and appropriate product from the range of providers hawking their unique takes on different amenities. Suggests Dell’s UK cloud strategy director, Gordon Davey, “Platforms chosen for a specific purpose will often have less over-provisioning, and will usually out-perform a generic multi-purpose solution. The aggregated cost and performance benefits of using the right platform for the right workload can often make a very compelling business case.”

Challenges of Multi-Cloud Systems


Managing the implementation of and utilizing multi-cloud systems requires strict management and overall consistency. Organization can easily find themselves juggling the features of different products for individual projects, losing track of their business goals in their efforts to adequately exploit the disparate features they have access to across service providers. An early obstacle revolves around the differing metrics cloud service providers deliver. For instance, as Peter Duffy, CTO of Sumerian, remarks, “All the cloud providers sell you compute instances in different sizes. So there’s complexity right there from the get-go. If I move a workload from Dell to Amazon, then how many of these should I be buying?”


The complexities around service provider integration create a greater space for cloud brokers who step into the thick of it and negotiate multi-cloud environments for businesses. Business brokers handle contracts and billing, and technical brokers assist in the operations of the multi-cloud systems. Kalyan Kumar, SVP of HCL Technologies, says, “Brokers help in unifying the different services, standardizing the implementations and taking care of governance, risk, and compliance.” He believes brokers simplify multi-cloud implementations, and continues, “They can also provide support and expertise that may not necessarily exist within the organization, such as managing the use, performance and delivery of cloud services.

Are the Benefits Worth It?

With the cloud already delivering enhanced flexibility and considerable choice, multi-cloud systems distil these benefits further from service provider down to product down to feature. Organizations can cherry-pick and tailor their solutions, disregarding the customizations or adaptations an individual service provider allows. But aside from the complexity this may create, a few other pertinent concerns must be addressed.

  • Cost

An oft-mentioned benefit of the cloud is the diminished expense. The benefits of CapEx reduction remains in a multi-cloud system, and one might imagine that choosing only the individual features required from relevant service providers would be an additional saving. However, most service providers are not providing their individual tools at cutthroat prices, but rather market complete systems competitively. It’s quite possible that choosing single tools from a range of providers to combine into your own system will be far more expensive than making use of a ready-made package from one provider.

  • Location & Security

Dealing with a range of providers is also likely to mean utilizing data centers in various locations. This requires a certain amount of extra effort on the user’s part, ensuring the regulations and policies of each data center address the needs of their organization. Privacy and security concerns are particularly relevant as many of the cloud services we make use of could leave us vulnerable should they not be appropriately controlled and safeguarded.

For now, the multi-cloud approach is more a theory than an actual system businesses make use of. Without brokers handling the intricacies of the collected services, organizations are likely to find themselves in a time consuming, and possibly treacherous, muddle. And with brokers managing the disparate systems, one wonders how truly distinct and personalized the final combination will be. Nevertheless, cloud solutions are developing so quickly they seem to be keeping pace with, and often outdistancing, our imaginations. Today’s fumbling multi-cloud systems could have a new sophistication shortly.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Government Involvement Required To Propel Canada’s Tech Industry

Government Involvement Required To Propel Canada’s Tech Industry

Canadian FinTech Argues Government Participation Needed to Help Industry Flourish

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA–(Marketwired – May 3, 2016) – Last month, Scotiabank’s CEO argued that the future of Canadian innovation relies primarily on the private sector to close the productivity gap between Canada and its international counterparts.

However, when it comes to FinTech and other budding technologies, there is much that must be done at the government level – from education and training, retention, regulation, and funding – to help accelerate growth needed to sustain the industry.

Technology is one of the strongest economic drivers in the country today,” says Rod Hsu, president of nTrust. “The federal and provincial government have made leaps and bounds in recent years in terms of helping the industry flourish, but sustained involvement is necessary. We need to approach the industry with the same eagerness we do others like the natural resource sector.”

Education and Training

It’s no secret a talent and skills gap exists between the Canadian workforce and the needs of tech employers. In fact, only 6 percent of the 527,000 students who completed a program in Canada in 2015 graduated from the IT field. Additionally, a recent report by the Information and Communications Technology Council called for reform of the country’s economic policies to address the gap – suggesting computer science programs be integrated into education from kindergarten onward. More attention must be placed by the government on fostering interest in and access to the field across all groups in order to mitigate the shortage.

Retaining Tech Talent

While the majority of tech firms can now compete with the best of Silicon Valley in terms of employee perks and benefits, the larger retention issue plaguing Canada is the lack of affordable housing in major metro centres like Vancouver and Toronto, which is slowly eating away at disposable income. As a result, businesses are having trouble attracting and retaining qualified candidates to the point where is has become an economic issue. Many in the industry have called for municipal, provincial and federal involvement to search for solutions to solve the housing crises in these markets.

Innovation/Incubation Hubs

Government can also play a role in facilitating FinTech acceleration by creating a stronger middle bridge between tech companies and financial institutions and/or larger organizations in the space. Already, Canada has several of these incubators – MaRS, DMZ, BCTIA – however when compared to other parts of the world, such as the UK, we are lagging behind. In addition to connecting FinTechs to resources and support and helping to broker valuable partnerships, these hubs provide a forum for experimentation and launch within a controlled boundary.


Despite rapid growth in the industry, uncertainty around the adaptability of the regulatory environment poses a potential risk for FinTechs across the country. Without a clear plan, FinTechs end up getting stifled in innovation with regulatory rules set for the incumbent financial system. However, regulation in the space should not be one size fits all – rather the flexibility of a tiered approach, that differs based on multiple factors such as the size of the business, would help drive further innovation rather than repress start-ups.

Adaptable regulation at the government level would assist in making FinTech a viable option for users, create space for innovation, while building the critical mass needed for the industry to thrive.


Recent funding announcements by the BC government, who launched a $100 million venture capital fund for tech startups earlier this year, are a huge step forward, however, there is some skepticism around whether this will sustain the growth required in the sector considering the over 9,000 tech companies currently in the province.

The future of the industry cannot be left to one group alone, rather it is collaboration between FinTechs, the private sector and levels of government that will lead to success and longevity in the industry.

About nTrust

nTrust is a rapidly growing online and mobile money transfer platform that helps people around the world instantly move and access their money. Using nTrust, members can send money to friends, cash out to their bank account, spend money through their phone, or load funds to a prepaid card to use anywhere the MasterCard® Acceptance Mark is displayed, online or in-person. nTrust’s proprietary technology uses the highest encryption standards and is “PCI-DSS Level 1” certified, which remains the top global standard for operational and technical security designed by Visa, MasterCard®, and American Express. 

How Big Data Can Impact Marketing Sector

How Big Data Can Impact Marketing Sector

Big Data Marketing Sector

It would be an understatement to say the era of big data is upon us. If you have been living under a rock, then you should know that big data means a collection of data which is so complex and large that it cannot be processed by traditional ways.

And it is increasing by every day. According to this report, big data generation will increase by 4,3000 per cent. This big data can also be used for creating marketing strategies to tap on new customers and win back the old ones.

When you use traditional techniques to analyse your data, you won’t know you are losing customers until you have actually lost them. And any effort or strategy made after that wouldn’t be half as effective because you would have already lost customers.

But with big data marketers can analyse future customer buying patterns and devise a marketing strategy accordingly to prevent customer loss.

Understand your business’s customer life cycle

If you pay attention to the numbers and the data trends, you will actually notice clear signs when a customer decides to make their first purchase or when they decide to stop buying from you completely. Using these signs, you can take the required steps.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

In order to do that, you will first have to identify the customer life cycle. The life cycle should be as granular as possible and it should resonate with every step of your business.

Once you have defined each step of the life cycle, it’s time to define what it means to be in each of those steps. For instance, the initial phase could be when a customer makes his first purchase in the first 15 days. On the other hand, an in-between phase could be an engaged customer who has already made 3 purchases, or visited your website at least 10 times in the last 30 days.

To make the life cycle actionable, you have to make sure each customer is in a single life cycle phase at a given point of time.

Depend on your data

Now that you have defined different phases in the customer life cycle, you have to identify what it means to be in each of these phases. You need to define customer behaviour in each phase and divide it into segments accordingly.


Basically, you need to use data modelling here to define the difference between an engaged customer and an at-risk customer.

This customer behaviour can help create the right marketing campaigns to make the at-risk customers go back to the engaged phase.

Find the customer lifetime value

Here’s a fact that every marketer already knows – some customers generate way more profit than the others. By calculating the customer lifetime value, it becomes easier to identify those customers and give more attention to them.

With this data, you could either create campaigns for less profitable users, to make them buy more or you could decide to exclude them from marketing campaigns.

Considering the future impact

While running any campaign, it’s important to concentrate on the full picture instead of just relying on the immediate campaign metrics.

For instance, you run an email campaign for upcoming discounts and within a few days you notice the number of purchases on the website have gone up. Noticing the immediate results, you decide to push the campaign further.

But what you don’t notice is the fact that many users unsubscribed from your company’s newsletter. This means that though there was an immediate profit from the email campaign, it ruined your company’s relationship with the customers in the long run.

That is why, instead of running every new campaign for the entire set of customers, choose a test group and run the campaign with them first. This will help you get the idea of how it will impact your business in the long run.

In Summary

Big data driven marketing will lead to more engaged campaigns. And while using customer data is not new to marketing, big data helps utilize all the data that a business has about their customers and it will definitely help improve profits in the long run.

By Ritika Tiwari

Taking Your Access Governance Processes To The Cloud

Taking Your Access Governance Processes To The Cloud

Access Governance

Access governance is a growing market in many different industries across the United States and beyond. Companies are investing money in access governance solutions to efficiently improve processes and ensure security of their networks, without a great deal of effort. As the cloud has become more of a standard in every organization, how does access governance apply to the cloud? Let us first look at exactly what it is.

The Importance of Access Governance In The Cloud

First, it’s important to fully understand exactly what access governance is and how it can help organizations of all sizes in every industry. Access governance ensures that each employee within the organization has the correct access rights to the exact resources that they need. This is important for many reasons, including for employees to efficiently perform their jobs and to keep the company’s network secure. While access management allows an organization to easily manage accounts and access, access governance puts a method in place to ensure and monitor access is correct for security reasons.

How is a typical access governance solution set up to work? The company first needs to set up a model of exactly the access rights for each role in the organization. For example, someone working as a manager in the IT department will need certain access rights to systems, applications and resources. This allows the person who is creating the account to easily do so without accidentally making any access mistakes; either giving the employee too many rights or too little rights.

Separation of Duties

Since access governance helps to ensure correct access rights according to a model, there needs to be methods in place to also ensure that there are no mistakes in the model. For example, in a large organization there are many different types of positions and responsibilities, many of which might overlap. It needs to be ensured that someone does not have the permission to both initiate some type of request and then also accept it. Separation of duties ensures that there is no conflict between usage and assignment of access rights.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Reconciliation is another way to ensure absolutely correct access rights. This module compares how access rights are set up to be in the model to how they actually are and creates a report on any differences. Anything that is not accurate can then be easily corrected.

Attestation is still another form of checking access and goes one step further to verify everything is correct. A report will be sent out to managers of a department of set of employees for them to verify that everything is correct. For example, the marketing manager will receive a report on the access rights of everyone in the marketing department. He or she will need to look over and either mark access right for deletion, change access right directly, or create a ticket in the helpdesk system to change the access right. After looking everything over the manager must give their final approval for the proposed set of changes to ensure that everything is correct.

Why is access governance important though for all applications throughout the company? As the amount of employees who are working remotely increases so does the users of cloud applications. In turn, there needs to be ways of ensuring security for these types of applications and for employees who are not working in the physical office.


When the employee is first hired at the company, it is not uncommon for them to accidentally receive too many rights, or acquire them over time from working on projects and never have them revoked. Access rights are frequently overlooked, especially for cloud applications. Access governance ensures that access rights are correct across the entire organization, from in house applications and cloud applications to even physical resources, such as cell phones.

This allows all access to be monitored across the entire organization. Here is what a typical situation would look like in an organization with varying different applications. A new employee is hired in the finance department as a senior accountant and needs accounts and resources created so he can begin work. Based on the model, which the company set up, the employee will automatically receive a Coupa cloud account, Quickbooks, access to the finance share drive and an email address.

Then the organization has it set up so that once a quarter the finance manager receives a report of all of the employees in the department and the access that they have, including now the new senior accountant. A few months later the manager sees that the senior accountant has access to an application for which he was using for a project that is now completed. The manager can easily tag the access to be revoked and ensure that it is done right away.

Since today’s organizations have many different types of applications, several types of employee working situations whether it be traveling, in office or remote, varying types of resources both tangible and intangible, etc., it is important that an access governance solution works with all of these situations. Organizations are willing to invest because access governance solutions ensure security, while overall also allowing employees the opportunity to remain productive, and, in the long run, save the company money.

By Dean Wiech

How Cloud Computing Is Changing The Retail Game

How Cloud Computing Is Changing The Retail Game

Cloud Computing Retail

The retail industry is constantly evolving to meet the ever-changing needs of consumers. This transformation is influenced by e-commerce, social networking and the latest technologies. Today’s shoppers expect a connected and interactive consumer experience from start to finish. According to a report by the National Retail Federation, it is a projected that retail sales (this includes automobiles, gas stations, and restaurants) will grow at around 3.1% this year – that is higher than the 10-year average of 2.7%.

As the size of the retail industry continues to grow, so does the pressure of retailers to satisfy the expectations of consumers. Retailers are expected to provide a seamless consumer journey across multiple channels as well as personalized offers based on consumer location and shopping habits. According to a recent survey by Accenture, 74% of surveyed retailers were ranked at or below “underdeveloped” to deliver a seamless customer experience. The survey further showed that 72.5% of retailers described having underdeveloped or absent capabilities in making the end-to-end shopping experience across different channels.

There are three major areas for retailers to address:

  1. Innovation: As the competitive landscape is constantly evolving, innovation is needed to keep pace.

  2. Agility: Agility is a key factor for differentiation as it enables rapid development and deployment of new solutions.

  3. New Technology: To stay ahead in the retail game, investing in new technologies and capabilities will be required.

Enter Cloud Computing…

Cloud computing is a very effective solution for retailers to build capabilities quick enough to attract consumers; it allows for them to adapt their offerings to meet the expectations of today’s digitally connected consumers throughout their shopping experience. In addition, retailers will start to recognize cloud computing as a cost effective technique that can enable rapid adoption of the latest solutions. There are those in the retail industry that are starting to recognize the potential of cloud technology and are utilizing it to their advantage.

The benefits of cloud computing for retail are numerous, to include:

  • Flexibility to scale up and down when required
  • Cost-effective streamlined operations
  • Real-time reporting
  • Quicker speed to market

Below are a few areas where cloud computing is influencing the retail industry:-

Marketing and Merchandising

One challenge for many retailers is the ability to sort through mountains of data, both internal and external, looking for insights and patterns to help them make merchandising decisions. Cloud technology can help in personalizing the in-store experience by analyzing digital data to fully understand their consumers. For example, there are mobile apps that can detect when a user steps in a store, sending them relevant promotions and coupons. There are also cloud-based social tools which give consumers the power to shop whenever and wherever they want.

Retail-as-a-Service (RaaS)


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

At present, many stores have fragmented legacy systems (i.e. inventory, reporting, shipping) that are used to run their operations. However, this means that data in each of these systems are stored in different formats. With cloud, retail-as-a-service (RaaS) is a possible solution as it brings multiple operational processes into a single cloud platform. With RaaS, both hardware and software updates can be handled by cloud service providers. The number of retailers adopting RaaS will surely increase in the near future.

Point of Sale (PoS)

Tablets and smartphones are now serving as POS systems, handling inventory, payments, and location information. These POS systems are eventually transitioning to the cloud. According to Accenture, Nordstorms was an early adopter of mobile POS systems, having implemented these systems in all of its stores by mid-2012.

Supply Chain

Not many retailers have adequate supply chain systems that are capable of handling their processes. However, with cloud supply chain, retailers can capture real-time information, as well as adjust to various conditions or even take advantage of new opportunities. Retail processes such as data tracking can be made easier through cloud technology.

As retailers adopt and utilize cloud technology, they will find themselves embarking on a path of differentiation and competitive advantage.

By Joya Scarlata

Has The Bitcoin Creator Been Discovered?

Has The Bitcoin Creator Been Discovered?

Bitcoin – Craig Wright?

Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright has publicly identified himself as Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto.

His admission ends years of speculation about who came up with the original ideas underlying the digital cash system. Mr Wright has provided technical proof to back up his claim using coins known to be owned by Bitcoin’s creator. Prominent members of the Bitcoin community and its core development team have also confirmed Mr Wright’s claim.

Signed blocks

Mr Wright has revealed his identity to three media organisations – the BBC, the Economist and GQ.

At the meeting with the BBC, Mr Wright digitally signed messages using cryptographic keys created during the early days of Bitcoin’s development. The keys are inextricably linked to blocks of bitcoins known to have been created or “mined” by Satoshi Nakamoto.

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The Internet of Everything: Why The IoT Will Take Over Every Industry

The Internet of Everything: Why The IoT Will Take Over Every Industry

Why The IoT Will Take Over Every Industry

It’s a big mistake to think that the Internet of Things will only remain relevant with tech industry movers and shakers and early adopters. One glance at the world around you, and you’ll quickly realize that the IoT is well on its way to becoming an everyday aspect of even the most low-tech workplaces.

The IoT is removing mundane busywork from countless blue-collar jobs, enabling businesses, cities, and entire industries to increase services while cutting demands for labor, training, resources, and equipment. In fact, the American Society for Quality surveyed a number of manufacturing companies that have embraced the IoT and uncovered some staggering numbers: Manufacturing efficiency increased by 82 percent, approximately half of the users saw fewer defects, and customer satisfaction swelled by 45 percent.

There’s no denying the fact that IoT applications are effective, but if you aren’t aware of just how widespread they are, you’re probably not prepared to keep up with the many sweeping changes on the horizon.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

What’s yet to come extends into the realm of what was once unthinkable: restaurant coolers that automatically place orders when they detect low stock and buildings that are wired to self-monitor their needs so custodians can place their focus elsewhere.

IoT automation is shaping up to be the future of any and all industries that currently revolve around manual-based labor, especially when it comes to monitoring and assessment.

The Low-Tech IoT in Action

Not long ago, mechanics had to look under the hood of a car to see what needed fixing. Now, all they need is a computer that automatically conducts the diagnostics. Similarly, industries such as home appliance repair, HVAC maintenance, and the following three are positioned to lose their reliance on human-based analysis because of IoT solutions:

  • Parking: The “dumb” devices we used to know as parking meters have smartened up. Instead of individual meters merely accepting change and outputting a simple timer, parking kiosks can now process credit card transactions, sense when spaces are available, and accept remote payments to extend time. Drivers can even interact with these systems remotely to find open spots. This cuts down on time, traffic, fuel consumption, and, most importantly, frustration.The impact here is bigger than you might guess. A study showed that drivers searching for parking rack up more than 950,000 miles every year in just one district in Los Angeles. The need for parking efficiency is obvious, and only the IoT can deliver such key solutions.
  • Metering: Self-monitoring “smart” meters in utility markets means millions in savings because of fewer mistakes and less maintenance. But that’s just the beginning; they also allow for optimization. The possibility for high granularity — reports can be collected as often as every 30 minutes — will help utility companies anticipate demand and respond accordingly.
  • Farming and agriculture: Even though it’s one of the oldest and least technical industries out there, not even farming is immune to IoT development. Farmers are currently using sensors to help increase crop yields, monitor weather patterns, and utilize their human resources with more accuracy. Believe it or not, they’re also tracking herd locations and monitoring hormone levels in livestock to determine ideal calving and milk production schedules.Some of the biggest names in farming and agriculture are already joining the IoT revolution: John Deere wants to transform the tractor into a data control center, and Monsanto is analyzing weather with the help of Google alumni.The data collected through IoT solutions can also enable food producers to offer the label transparency that today’s consumers increasingly demand.

Once again, innumerable man-hours and resources are saved in low-tech industries that embrace IoT applications — and, as a result, profits soar.

In the Future, Everything Is IoT-Oriented

The IoT will continue to develop fruitful collaborations between the high- and low-technology worlds — and anyone who isn’t prepared will be left behind. “Adapt or die,” the old adage, applies here as much as anywhere.

What we’re going to see in the coming years will be unprecedented, but not unpredictable. Processes and operations that weren’t even conceivable a few years ago are going to come to life, take over, and replace low-tech methods with unmatched efficiency.

The coming convergence of high- and low-tech approaches is certain to happen in very disruptive and unpredictable ways. Soon enough, anything that isn’t connected will be as good as dead. The term “high-tech” itself could cease to exist as we watch the most unexpected industries begin to integrate labor-saving tech connectivity to multiply their efficiency.

Your choice is simple: Get ready for the IoT to come to your business, or get ready to go out of business.

By John Horn

John-HornJohn is the CEO of Ingenu, which he joined after serving as president of RacoWireless, a leading provider of machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity solutions. Before joining RacoWireless, Horn was a leader at T-Mobile for more than nine years while he focused specifically on developing the company’s M2M program and go-to-market strategy.

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The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Education Tech and the Cloud Arguably one of society’s most important functions, teaching can still seem antiquated at times. Many schools still function similarly to how they did five or 10 years ago, which is surprising considering the amount of technical innovation we’ve seen in the past decade. Education is an industry ripe for innovation…


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