Category Archives: Cloud Computing

IBM Redefines Security, Availability and Economics of Storing Data in the Hybrid Cloud

IBM Redefines Security, Availability and Economics of Storing Data in the Hybrid Cloud

ARMONK, NY – 13 Oct 2016: IBM (NYSE: IBM) today is introducing a new cloud object storage service that redefines the security, availability and economics of storing, managing and accessing massive amounts of digital information across hybrid clouds. The company’s breakthrough new IBM Cloud Object Storage offering derives from IBM’s acquisition of Cleversafe and its significant portfolio of patents which are designed to deliver clients better value with industry-leading security.

Though organizations are flocking to the cloud for improved efficiencies and IT agility, clients see a gap in their ability to store increasingly larger volumes of data – on premises and off premises. Presently companies have to choose between storing data on internal servers and storage systems, or in the cloud. It’s a dilemma that has hindered business flexibility and raised infrastructure costs. As data volumes continue to grow across industries, the need to create flexible hybrid cloud storage solutions has intensified.

The new IBM Cloud Object Storage storage-as-a-service offerings will enable clients for the first time to scale large unstructured data volumes across on-premises systems as well as public and private clouds quickly and easily. This will dramatically increase IT system flexibility and security. In a price comparison of identical object storage capacity running on a competitive cloud, the new IBM Cloud Object Storage demonstrated more than 25% lower costs for the capacity, environment and locations compared. Built on an innovation called SecureSlice from industry leader, Cleversafe, (acquired by IBM in 2015), IBM Cloud Object Storage is designed to make storing and managing that data on the IBM Cloud reliable and available across regions and around the clock.

As clients continue to move massive workloads to hybrid clouds there is a need for an easier, more secure and economical way to store and manage mounting volumes of digital information,” said Robert LeBlanc, Senior Vice President, IBM Cloud. “With today’s announcement, IBM becomes the leading cloud vendor to provide clients the flexibility and availability of object data storage across on-premises and public clouds.”

Bitly Migrates 1 Billion Datasets to IBM Cloud Object Storage; Adopts IBM as its Exclusive Cloud Platform

Bitly, the world’s leading customer experience platform, is continually looking for new ways to help organizations use its software platform to gain actionable insights about their customers. The company has adopted the new IBM Cloud Object Storage service to more quickly and easily analyze historical data that is being produced by the more than 10 billion clicks it processes each month across the world. This historical data, up to 500TB, includes user interactions across online channels – useful information for marketers that are using Bitly to deliver and measure their efforts across all marketing channels.

With more than 400 million new links created every month, the Bitly platform is growing at an explosive rate,” said Robert Platzer, CTO, Bitly. “We turned exclusively to IBM Cloud because of its leadership in data services. Through this partnership IBM will help us transform our business and build a variety of new cloud services – from advanced analytics and data mining to data research – into our software platform. The new IBM Cloud Object Storage service will enable us to manage all the data from our on-premises and cloud infrastructure with ease and flexibility.”

Bitly’s adoption of IBM Cloud Object Storage is part of a deep multi-year partnership with IBM. With today’s announcement, IBM Cloud has become the exclusive cloud platform for Bitly. Earlier this year, the company moved 25 billion data-infused links to IBM Cloud to take advantage of the high performance and global scale of IBM’s nearly 50 global Cloud Data Centers. With that migration complete, the company has turned its attention to managing all 1 billion datasets of the historical interactions behind those links with IBM Cloud Object Storage.

IBM Breaks the Constraints of Today’s Storage Architecture

At the heart of the new IBM Cloud Object Storage service is IBM’s innovative SecureSlice, which combines encryption and erasure coding for greater security and information dispersal which enhances data availability. These fundamental technologies can help clients satisfy their data compliance security requirements and maintain access to critical data even in the face of a regional outage. These capabilities are also delivered without having to make expensive copies of data, resulting in improved economics to clients. Specifically:


IBM is the only company to have combined erasure coding with encryption and decryption. When data comes into the IBM Cloud Object Storage system, SecureSlice automatically encrypts each segment of data before it is erasure coded and dispersed. The content can only be re-assembled through IBM Cloud’s “Accesser” technology at the client’s primary data center, where the data was originally received, and decrypted by SecureSlice.


Because of these innovations, IBM Cloud Object Storage can tolerate even catastrophic regional outages without interruption of access to data or the need for customer intervention. Continuous availability is inherent in the architecture. Some traditional cloud storage providers, place the burden of data management and the cost for creating and maintaining a second copy for regional fault tolerance on the client.


As a result of the technology’s robust hybrid capabilities, IBM Cloud Object Storage has demonstrated it can, for the compared capacity, environment and locations, reduce certain overall costs of cloud storage. For example, based on internal IBM testing comparing IBM Cloud Object Storage Vault Cross-Region Services to a leading vendor in head-to-head Cross Region service managing ½ petabyte (PB) of data, the IBM solution was close to 24% less expensive for the location and workload compared, and at 5PB the service was more than 25% less expensive.

Delivering the Flexibility Clients Need to Meet Business Requirements

IBM Cloud Object Storage is offered in two public, multi-tenant services: Cross Region Service, which sends the sliced data to at least three geographically dispersed regions across IBM Cloud data centers; and Regional Service, which holds the data in multiple data centers in a given region. Both the Regional and Cross Region services provide SecureSlice, encrypted erasure coding to protect the data. The new services complement the company’s existing IBM Cloud Object Storage System for on premises object storage, and the IBM Cloud Object Storage Dedicated Service, a private cloud offering that runs on bare-metal servers on IBM Cloud. All of the IBM Cloud Object Storage services on or off-premises support Amazon S3 and OpenStack Swift interfaces for greater programming flexibility.

IBM Brings Cloud Object Storage to hundreds of Storage Platforms with Transparent Cloud Tiering

Finally, for the first time, IT organizations with on-premises storage will be able to move data seamlessly to and from the cloud. IBM Spectrum Virtualize will add hybrid cloud capabilities to nearly 400 platforms, both IBM and non-IBM. IBM Spectrum Virtualize, IBM Spectrum Protect and IBM Spectrum Scale, use Transparent Cloud Tiering to extend traditional storage to the cloud with policy driven, automated simplicity, security and control.

IBM Cloud Object Storage is available now for enterprise clients across IBM Cloud data centers in the US and Europe and will be available in the Asia Pacific region in December. Availability via digital channels, with swipe-and-go credit card support, will begin in the US starting in December and Europe soon thereafter.

About IBM

For more on IBM Cloud, visit

For more on IBM Storage, visit

For more information on IBM Cloud Object Storage, visit

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime

Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed to have been driven through a botnet that included IoT-connected devices like digital cameras. This was something special and unusual, and a stark warning about the future of cyber warfare.

The attack was so large and relentless that the journalist’s site had to be taken down temporarily. The exercise of fending off the attack and then repairing and rebuilding was extremely expensive. Given that the target was a writer and expert on online security and cybercrime, the attack was not only highly destructive but also symbolic: a warning to security specialists everywhere that the war has changed.

Chris Sellards, a Texas-based Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP) agrees. He points to the sheer volume of IoT connected devices – a number that is growing exponentially, with Gartner forecasting 6.4 billion devices to be connected this year.

PC users have become a little more sophisticated with regard to security in recent years,” Sellards says. “They used to be the prime target when creating a botnet and launching DDoS attacks because they rarely patched their systems and browser configuration settings were lax by default. However, with automatic upgrades and an increased use of personal firewalls and security apps, PCs have become a little more of a challenge to penetrate. Attackers almost always take the path of least resistance.”

Consequently, IoT devices have become the new playground. They are the new generation of connected machines that use default passwords, hard coded passwords, and inadequate patching. The rush to make everything IoT compatible and affordable leaves little time or incentive for manufacturers to build in sophisticated security layers. In addition, there is an innocence factor at play. Who would ever suspect their digital camera, fitness tracker or smart thermostat of being an accomplice to cybercrime?


Sellards points out that one of the most interesting aspects of the attack was that GRE (Generic Routing Encapsulation protocol) was used instead of the normal amplification techniques used in most DDoS attacks. This represents a change in tactic specifically designed to take advantage of the high bandwidth internet connections that IP based video cameras use.

These developments have experts like Sellards worried, given the huge – and growing – number of IoT devices that form part of the nation’s critical infrastructure. “If default and hardcoded passwords can be compromised to install malware that launches DDoS attacks, they can also be compromised to launch more nefarious attacks with significantly higher consequences,” he says. It shows IoT installs are insecure and not hardened. They are exposed to the Internet without firewall filtering. “All best business practices we’ve spent decades developing have gone right out the window.” 

IoT in general represents a fascinating new chapter in convenience and communication for businesses and consumers alike. But as all security experts already know, the bad guys never rest. The way in which they discovered and exploited both the weaknesses and the built-in features of IoT shows a creativity and dedication that must never be ignored. Thus the value of a CCSP having a seat at the executive table has just increased exponentially.

For more on the CCSP certification from (ISC)2, please visit their website. Sponsored by (ISC)2.

By Steve Prentice

Why The Sharing Economy Is The Future

Why The Sharing Economy Is The Future

The Sharing Economy

Today the sharing economy is spreading across the entire economy (check out this infographic via Near Me if you don’t believe me). It is praised by some to be “the future of market capitalism”, and lambasted by others as “the desperate economy”, it’s a psuedo-socialist disruption solution to monopolies that have sprung up across the entire global economy. The latest industry to be taken on by the sharing economy has been financial services, in a vein of start-ups now known as Fintech.


Fintech and the sharing economy are conceptually intertwined, decentralisation is at the core of what they are each trying to do. Where platforms like YouTube removed publishing and publicity costs to almost nothing, Uber and Airbnb did the same for their respective industries; and now Fintech is following suit. In a financial context this has been focused on on decentralisation of asset ownership, social payments, crowdfunding, and the growth of peer-to-peer lending and insurance.


Development of new tech, such as the blockchain, has provided excellent opportunities for cost reduction and efficiency in money transfers and payments. By reducing fees, small digital payments have become increasingly more viable and cost effective, with the door being opened to an entire market of new products and services, which can be built around smaller, more granular consumption. The vast majority of consumer financial services are driven by the need to conduct peer-to-peer transactions, that is unlikely to change. What is beginning to change is the platforms and institutions that facilitate these transactions; we are moving from large banks towards a broader ecosystem of banks and Fintech companies, with some commentators suggesting that banks could eliminated altogether (though that is some way down the line).


(Image Source: Pricewaterhouse Coopers)

The sharing economy and Fintech have already made massive inroads in certain areas of the financial services industry, garnered huge investments and has been forecasted to experience astronomical levels of growth year on year. PwC (Pricewaterhouse Coopers), has predicted the scale of the sharing economy market, in fields such as P2P lending, crowd funding, automobiles, housing, media and manpower sourcing, to grow from $15 billion in 2013 to $3.35 trillion in 2025. These figures may seem foolishly optimistic, but you only have to look at the successes that Fintech start-ups have enjoyed thus far, as the scale to which they could impact the economy – look at Kickstarter (and crowdfunding in general). Since 2014, Kickstarter has progressed with approximately 20,000 projects, 780,000 investors and generated approximately U$1.5 billion in investment capital. And that is just with Kickstarter, the global crowdfunding economy was worth $34.4 billion in 2015 and is expected to surpass Venture Capital investment in 2016 (which is, on average, around $45 billion).

Yet, that is just one area in which the sharing economy has begun to disrupt traditional financial markets and institutions. With Apple Pay already redefining digital payments, Apple has now filed a patent application for “person-to-person payments using electronic devices” that could allow iPhone users to transfer money between friends and family more easily, imagine Airdrop for money. This has the potential to further commoditize retail banking; instead of using high cost bankers to broker the connection between two parties, technology can allow us to make the cheaper and more efficiently. The sharing economy has also demonstrated its ability to revolutionise more rural or less developed economies. For example, M-PESA in Kenya, handles deposits and payments using customers’ phones and a network of agents. According to a recent report, the service is now being used by 90% of the adult population in the country; the Economist has even declared Kenya the world leader in mobile money, thanks to M-PESA.

Much like many other aspects of the sharing economy, it has the potential to overtake the entire financial services via Fintech platforms. However, traditional banking is unlikely to die quite as easily as some may hope; we are much more likely to see banks and Fintech start-ups working together in an intertwined and decentralised financial ecosystem. The sharing economy is here to stay, and for Fintech that means more innovation and more investment… Sounds alright to me.

By Josh Hamilton

Ouissam Youssef Discusses Digital Estate Investment

Ouissam Youssef Discusses Digital Estate Investment

Digital Estate Investment

Sponsored series by the Valsef Group

The principles of real estate investment are as ancient as the idea of private land ownership. Old-timer savvy investors used to joke that the beauty of buying land was that god wasn’t planning to make more of it. Therefore, its value could only go up. However, real estate on the internet, or the space occupied by businesses or private citizens in the worldwide web, is seemingly infinite. Anyone can acquire ‘digital estate’ and own a new dot-com or a personal website. Citizens can practically create land at will, and its value is completely unbound from the classic notion of prime location, which remains tied to physical geography. Since digital estate (for lack of a better noun) is virtual, investors interested in identifying and acquiring prime assets that are likely to increase their value in the near future have had to write a new rulebook.

Web Based Business Investment

Sam Youssef - photo 2 (1)Shrewd investors are incorporating successful online ventures into their overall business structures, and says one such patron, Ouissam Youssef, co-founder of Valnet Inc., “We see the web as a galaxy of virtual properties.” Finding web properties which offer both increasing and enduring value is no mean feat, but with sufficient understanding of the principles and knowledge of the market, it’s possible to triumph.

Though many of today’s venture capitalists aim to buy low and quickly sell high for maximum profits with little to no business involvement, Youssef advocates more close and long-standing arrangements. “We chose to build our market share and digital estate by investing in companies that have a proven track record in a hot niche, and that share our values.” Digital estates acquired under these principles are naturally provided with greater care to maximize potential now and in the future, and just as ‘brick and mortar’ real estate gains worth through the expertise of developers, so too does digital estate benefit from the expertise of industry specialists.

Prolific Motivations

Success stories abound though with the industry as a whole linked to some of the original dot-com ventures of the early internet years, practical investors may be wary of jumping the gun. A few substantial motivations, however, should be considered.

  • Digital estate offers the merit of low overheads, and with the success of cloud services running these platforms requires less technical know-how leaving proprietors free to invest creativity and business expertise for greater success.

  • Growing a good business is often easier than building one from the ground up, and smart investors purchase promising digital estate with an eye to expand and develop performance. Many web businesses already have strong teams and effective strategies in place that need little more than active support and constructive expertise to mature.

  • The internet is a limitless realm, and happily, you can’t make the mistake of buying in the wrong area. Web business ventures stand and fall by the effort and initiative afforded them and careful investment in refurbishment, marketing, research, and development will always result in the elevation of the digital estate.

An Effective Strategy

Embracing the niche market of entertainment and lifestyle, Valnet has shown success in online publishing with content-driven properties generating over a billion monthly pageviews. Recognizing the fragmentation of media and the evolution of communication has allowed a shift away from mainstream media to the lithe and fluid web where each of us is free to choose only the content which appeals to our personal tastes. Organizations serving such tastes offer a virtual city filled with the most beautiful and profitable buildings, each with their own unique charm. Comments Youssef, “An impossibility in real estate investment, but therein lies the exciting edge of digital estate.

Online real estate is easy to come by, but owning a successful web property requires a lot more effort and know-how than one might imagine. Of course, if you choose and manage your property well, just as in the ‘real’ world your digital estate provides numerous avenues for income and successful business development.

By Jennifer Klostermann

If Not Managed Correctly, The Cloud Can Cost An Organization

If Not Managed Correctly, The Cloud Can Cost An Organization

Cloud Application Management

When organizations implement cloud applications, they do so as a means to be more efficient and in the hopes of saving a great deal of money. What many organizational leaders often don’t realize is that they need some type of solution to help them manage these applications in the background for them to be successful. Without some way to properly manage cloud applications, organizations can actually spend a great deal of time and money to have someone manually managing these processes, rather than saving them time and resources.

While the management of cloud applications doesn’t sound difficult, it is very time consuming. Think about an organization that has frequent movement of employees or has temporary employees working there. To create accounts for each of these employees and make changes when needed, often requires a full-time admin. For the admin, they can quickly become overwhelmed with work and calls for changes to accounts, which can leave them no time to handle other more technical or important projects.


The management of these applications not only effects admins, but also has an effect on other groups. The organization as a whole — the helpdesk or admin and the end users — are all affected. For example, the organization and its managers are concerned with how much the overall cost and ROI is of the technology that they use and how efficiently everything works. If the cloud is not managed correctly it can end up costing more time and money for the organization.

And, of course, what about the end user? They want to be able to access what they need quickly and efficiently and have any changes to their accounts or access made in a timely manner so that they can complete their work and any projects. Who wants to wait around for additional access to work on a project that has a deadline. For example, often an employee needs to contact a manager or admin if they need access to an application or to make a change to their account. If this request is time sensitive, they may continually contact the manager to check up on the progress and see if the change is being implemented.

Why Organizations Are Hesitant

Why are organizations hesitant about a solution, such as identity and access management, to help manage their cloud applications then if they can benefit many different people and groups in the organization? One of the reasons for the resistance is that many of the solutions that were available to help with account management when they first came out were often large scale solutions, which cost a lot, took a long time to implement, and were for larger organizations.

Many organizations also think that they can just do it themselves. The reality is they don’t realize that these tasks are extremely time consuming and are taking time from some of their highly technical employees who could be working on other projects. It also might be costing them more to have a full-time employee manually managing cloud applications and issues. Many IAM vendors now offer the ability to choose exactly which modules are needed so that they don’t need to purchase a large enterprise solution with modules that they don’t need. They can tell the vendor exactly what is needed and have them customize the solution. This drastically reduces both the cost and the time to implement. This allows even smaller organizations to benefit from IAM solutions.

How IAM Solutions Can Help

So now that we talked about why a solution is needed and why many organizations are hesitant to employ the solutions, let’s look at how many types of different IAM solutions can assist with the cloud applications that organizations use.

Account management of cloud applications can easily be automated along with in-house applications. An automated account management allows the organization to link their HR system to the systems and applications that the company uses so that any change that is made in the HR system is automatically reflected in all connected applications. So for example, when a new employee starts at the organization they can simply be added to the HR system and have their accounts automatically generated for them. This allows both the admin to quickly create accounts and the end user to begin work right away without needing to wait around.

Another solution that can be used is workflow management. Using a web portal, employees can request any additional access rights to their current applications or even new applications. A workflow is setup so that when a user requests a change, the request then goes through a predefined sequence of people who need to approve it before the change is implemented. The organization can set up the workflow process however they desire, so that depending on the user, and what they request, the process goes through a specific sequence. There is also no need for the employee to bother their manager to check on the request. They can easily access the web portal and see exactly where the request is and what steps still need to be completed.

These are just some of the many solutions that help with the management of cloud applications behind the scenes. There are many other ways that IAM solutions can be customized to meet the unique needs of each organization. Since we discussed how the management of the cloud has an effect on several groups within the organization lets now look at how an IAM solution can benefit these different groups.

For the admin, they can easily manage user accounts or even delegate this task to a less technical employee so that they can work on other more technical issues and projects. They no longer need to perform tedious account management tasks that are extremely time consuming. For the end user, they can easily get any access or application they need efficiently without needing to continually contact an admin. With the portal in the workflow management module, they have an easy way of requesting any changes if needed. Lastly, for the managers and overall organization they can realize the true benefits of cloud applications without needing to focus on the manual tasks of creating, disabling, and making changes to user account.

By Dean Wiech

Shadow IT and Infrequent Audits Open Door to Data Security Vulnerabilities in the Cloud

Shadow IT and Infrequent Audits Open Door to Data Security Vulnerabilities in the Cloud

Shadow IT and Infrequent Audits

Blancco Technology Group Study Finds 26 Percent of Organizations Have Limited Visibility into Use of All Cloud Storage Providers

Atlanta and London, October 12, 2016 – Lack of visibility into an organization’s use of cloud providers can lead to unauthorized access to data, improper handling and storage of data and improper data removal. As a result, organizations are left highly exposed and vulnerable to a data breach, reveals the “Lost in the Cloud: Data Security Challenges and Risks” research study released today by Blancco Technology Group (LON: BLTG).

Based on a survey of over 290 IT professionals in the US, Canada, Mexico, UK, Germany, France, India, Japan and China, the study indicates that 26 percent of organizations are either “not confident’ or ‘somewhat confident’ about their IT teams’ knowledge of the use of all cloud storage providers. Further exacerbating data security vulnerabilities in the cloud, 15 percent of organizations rarely or never conduct audits of cloud providers who are storing their corporate data.

Key findings from the study include:

  • Consolidation and diversification is the name of the cloud computing game. 89 percent of the surveyed IT professionals said they use a total of 1-15 private cloud storage providers and 92 percent use 1-15 public cloud storage providers.
  • Fighting off APTs, compromised credentials and hacked interfaces are top cloud security priorities. When we asked IT professionals to rank various cloud security threats in terms of their company’s priority – specific to budgets, resources and tools – the respondents cited advanced persistent threats (APTs), compromised credentials and hacked interfaces/APIs as being top priorities.
  • Data migration and data center decommissioning processes are fundamental to preventing data loss. 16 percent of organizations admitted that they ‘do not know’ what security precaution they would take to prevent data loss/theft when decommissioning/shutting down a cloud/virtual server.
  • Cloud storage needs defined audit processes and monitoring to stay compliant. Close to half (40 percent) of organizations believe storing corporate data in a cloud environment increases their compliance risk.

richardRichard Stiennon, Chief Strategy Officer of Blancco Technology Group, urges organizations to counter these data security vulnerabilities by conducting cloud compliance audits on a regular basis. “Whenever storing data offsite with a cloud provider, organizations must be diligent in knowing where their data is being stored, how it’s being protected and when it needs to be removed (in the case of migrating data to a new vendor or consolidating data centers, for example). A cloud compliance audit should include a review of policies and procedures that the cloud storage provider applies to your data, the technical solutions in place to protect your data and the skills of technical or business staff responsible for your data.

Deep Learning and AI in Fintech

Deep Learning and AI in Fintech

Deep Learning

Financial services have been revolutionised over the last 20 years by increasingly powerful technology such as big data analytics, neural networks, evolutionary algorithms, and machine learning. Now, Fintech is on the cusp of a truly revolutionary moment, the integration of AI and deep learning into financial services. This combination really has the potential to revolutionise money and the global financial landscape in ways we never could have imagined 20 years ago. This is hardly by accident, a 2015 report by Accenture tracked the global investment in Fintech; revealing it has jumped from $930 million in 2008 to over $12 billion by the start of 2015.

Data Explosion

The explosion of data over the last 10 years has been incredible, and has been so vast that there has been little way to comprehend it without intelligent automated support. As analytics advances, so does the need for increased computational power to crunch the big numbers, and AI systems are becoming easier and easier to develop adapt and integrate.

Many companies already use programs like Kasisto, a KAI powered conversational UX, to help to improve customer service and connect customers to products and services. Kasisto are currently pioneering the use of their bot to help people manage stocks and portfolios (check it out here). However, this has been around for a few years now, and it really only scratches the surface of how AI is going to transform Fintech. AI and machine learning is being applied across the financial world, this is the next step in financial evolution. Fintech start-ups such as AffirmZest Finance, and Kensho, have applied deep learning to improve decision making and financial processing. Zest Finance are redefining credit scores and challenging the use of “little data”, using big data analytics to provide a much more accurate credit score than is possible in the current system.


Machine Learning Algorithms

One of the key features of emerging start-ups has been the use of machine learning algorithms to gain an analytical edge in trading. What tends to vary is the proposed clientele. For example, start-ups like Binatix are aimed more at large data sets and analytics for portfolio and hedge fund management on a wider scale; whereas Williamsburg based Inovance, is attempting to bring machine learning based trading analytics to the rescue of common investors. Similarly, earlier this year, Alpaca (deep learning Fintech start-up) launched Capitalico; a deep learning trading platform, that allows traders to automate their trade ideas without any programming or market investing experience.

This theme runs throughout the evolution of finance, banking is becoming ever-more personalised. Smart wallets like will help you consider, analyse, price, and consider every single thing you purchase, in a way that no bank, financial advisor or human assistant could begin to attempt. Following many years of having “offshored” repetitive tasks to lower-cost locations, PWC have predicted that this financial revolution will lead to “reshoring” and localisation of banking again thanks to the falling costs of automation and AI innovation.

AI analytics can be applied across the entire financial world, the next level of disruption has arrived, and it spells the end for banking as we know it. In the coming years we will see deep learning infiltrate identity authentication, portfolio construction, automated investment, fraud detection, and transactional safety; not a stone will lay un-turned in the financial world. PWC has predicted that the next three to five years are likely to lay the foundations, with “modest, evolutionary gains”, followed by rapid expansion as the technology becomes cheaper, more widely available, and more accepted by the general populace. The partnership of deep learning and Fintech is still very young, who knows where it could take us?

By Josh Hamilton

CloudTweaks Comics
The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

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Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

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Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

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A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

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The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

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The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Are CEO’s Missing Out On Big Data’s Big Picture?

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The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

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Three Ways To Secure The Enterprise Cloud

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Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

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Micro-segmentation – Protecting Advanced Threats Within The Perimeter

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Micro-segmentation Changing with the times is frequently overlooked when it comes to data center security. The technology powering today’s networks has become increasingly dynamic, but most data center admins still employ archaic security measures to protect their network. These traditional security methods just don’t stand a chance against today’s sophisticated attacks. That hasn’t stopped organizations…

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

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Digital Transformation Digital transformation is the acceleration of business activities, processes, and operational models to fully embrace the changes and opportunities of digital technologies. The concept is not new; we’ve been talking about it in one way or another for decades: paperless office, BYOD, user experience, consumerization of IT – all of these were stepping…


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