Category Archives: Cloud Computing

The Difficulties Of Operationalizing Big Data

The Difficulties Of Operationalizing Big Data

Operationalizing Big Data

Practically everything is digital now – if not at the moment, it definitely will be in the near future.

This big change caused the creation of something we call Big Data. Each time people use their smartphone, create a new profile on a website, purchase an item or update their social platform, the amount of available data grows.

Most companies have become aware of the massive potential of using Big Data, but detailed analysis of such data needs to become the norm in this modern age. However, many are experiencing difficulties with data consolidation, and don’t really know how to operationalize Big Data. There are a number of problems associated with this process that need to be addressed.


(Infographic Source: Domo)

The Numbers Are Huge

An amazing and a bit of a scary fact about Big Data is that over 2.5 exabytes of new data is created on a daily basis. But that’s not all – those numbers are growing month after month. It’s very difficult to comprehend the amount of information available, let alone manage it properly. This information, which eventually creates a data pond, doesn’t come just through the internet, but also through customer data collected by businesses and large corporations.

During the last 20 years or so, businesses have based their advertising strategies on this type of data. In one survey that has been conducted recently, with about 1000 participants from different industries, over 70% of them stated that Big Data is of crucial importance to their business.

Diversity Is a Problematic Factor

If something is measurable, it can be managed. Obviously, we’re aware of the growing amounts of data arriving each second – that’s actually equal to all of the information stored on the internet twenty years ago – but that doesn’t make things any easier, because of one problematic little factor – diversity.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

It doesn’t really matter where the data is coming from – social platforms, GPS signals, smartphones, etc. – because most of it has one thing in common; they are relatively new. This incredibly fast jump forward in all areas of technology makes it quite difficult for Big Data to be properly stored and efficiently managed.

Most businesses are starting to migrate to the cloud. As this continues to happen, the diversity of Big Data will keep on growing, expanding and become more and more difficult to control.

Most Companies don’t have the Proper Methodology

The way that companies currently control and manage these huge data sets is by placing them in a pattern that can be properly analyzed by already existing methodologies. As we just mentioned – the way business is done is changing, so it’s a matter of time when this will turn into a huge problem. It’s not enough to just load a large amount of data without an efficient way of structuring it to allow for greater accessibility and information.

Where to Start?

The general problem with Big Data is that it’s being improperly structured. Well, actually, not structured at all. Look at it this way – imagine a huge storage space that’s filled with piles and piles of items that are nothing alike. The first thing to do here is to get those piles sorted into categories.


Things like metadata tags that would allow you to structure the data more efficiently, and rules that can be set up to determine the way certain types of data need to be stored and modified, and if any information needs to be masked. In other words, the data that is loaded has to form a comprehensive “skeleton” that allows data analysts to quickly extrapolate tactics and strategies. Additional attention should be paid to securing all this information.

All in all, some changes are in order. Each and every customer or client is a data transmitter, so to speak, and are witnessing a sort of informational evolution. With huge amounts of information gathering into data lakes, it is important to set ground rules that help create a basic structure for storing all the available data, so that it can be efficiently accessed and analyzed. After all, it is the monotonous grunt work that sets the stage for grand business strategies.

By Pavle Dinic

The Lurking Threat Called Passivity

The Lurking Threat Called Passivity

The Lurking Threat

What is lurking inside your company’s systems that is making them vulnerable to attack? Hacking, phishing and other types of attacks are often considered to be externally driven, with gangs of anonymous hackers operating from halfway around the world using Internet connections to break in and wreak havoc. But surprisingly, a significant proportion of network security events happen on the inside. Depending on the particular organization or industry, this percentage can range from 35% to 90%. In addition, a significant portion of the vulnerability of any system starts passively—in other words, with features and items that are not active viruses or cracking tools, but whose mere presence eats away at the defenses.


Consider busy employees. They have lots to do, and constant distractions pull their attention away from practicing proper computer hygiene. In their haste to get to a meeting or catch a flight, laptops are lost, phones get misplaced and USB drives are borrowed. As convenient as these devices are, much of the data and documentation stored on them is unencrypted. Few people ever choose to assign a password to a Microsoft Word file; it takes too much time. The same goes for other types of passwords, too. It is time-consuming and annoying to change them every two weeks, especially if they are difficult to remember. A proper password should be a string of 16 or more essentially unintelligible characters, but most of us just don’t like to do that.

Dormant Data

Then there are those who are simply not around anymore. People leave, some get fired and others simply get promoted or move elsewhere. This results in many dormant user accounts lurking in the depths of the system. Still more accounts may never have been activated. They sit there, with their default passwords invisible due to inactivity, a fertile place for sophisticated thieves to set up shop and establish a back door.


(Image Source:

Some employees access files, directories or other areas by accident, assigning documents to the wrong drives, clicking on the wrong link or simply not knowing what they are doing. Such mistakes are not the fault of the individual. Many people have never been able to bring their degree of computer literacy up to an adequate level. Even those who are familiar with password changing regimens, and who do not use a stranger’s USB drives, may be unaware of sinister activities such as Wi-Fi website spoofing, for example. This happens when the free Wi-Fi login for an honest-to-goodness coffee shop is replaced or overshadowed by a sophisticated reproduction working in the same hotspot, inviting workers to share everything on their mobile devices with them.

These actions may fly under the radar, especially when security does not or cannot maintain sufficient definitions of “correct” or “normal” activity on a network. Security specialists themselves often do not have the resources to adequately police internal activities, even when a budget has been established.

Malignant Operators

It is evident that none of these human-sourced weaknesses are the result of a specific virus or action. They are generally passive in nature, relying on the fact that people are both goodhearted and under great pressure. However, these activities are the types that offer safe harbor to malignant operators, who either hack in and sniff out these soft spaces or already work within the organization and are intent on sabotage or espionage.

Network security will always be an ongoing battle. The enemy is relentless. That’s why a strategy must come from the top. It should focus not solely on technical solutions, but also on human elements such as time management, planning and communication, backed up with adequate and ongoing training. For as distanced as these soft skills seem to be from the digital world of computers, they are the levers by which the bad guys force open a crack and move inside.

For more on this topic, go to, sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

By Steve Prentice

How To Use Big Data And Analytics To Help Consumers

How To Use Big Data And Analytics To Help Consumers

Big Data Analytics

Businesses are under increasing pressure to develop data-driven solutions. The competitive advantage gained by a successful strategy can be immense. It can create new opportunities and help businesses to react to different scenarios or sudden changes in the market. But innovation and resilience are not easily achieved, and organizations always face difficult decisions about what data to collect and how to leverage insights effectively.

Even today, companies are still unsure about how to use the data they collect, with differences between C-suite executives reflecting wider organizational divisions. But, by looking at organizations that use data and analytics to identify and help consumers successfully, a few useable insights emerge.

Think Big, Start Small

The scale and technical challenges involved in big data and analytics projects can be a problem, especially when paired with lofty expectations and the high fixed costs involved in research and development. These barriers can make it difficult for small companies to keep pace with larger ones who have bigger budgets and access to the latest technology.


One way that small and big companies alike can exploit the disruptive potential of big data analytics is by starting small, with a clear focus on a single area and application. By increasing – and demonstrating – the value of big data and analytics in one area, such as customer support and relationship management (CRM), before moving on to the other applications, you can build expertise and understanding, with the benefits filtering down to other parts of the organization bit by bit.

Invest in Talent

Lack of talent is one of the main obstacles faced by small and medium-sized businesses looking to implement big data and analytics strategies. Many struggle to find people with the high-level skills necessary to conceive and run a big data and analytics project. With technical expertise a prerequisite for success, it’s no surprise that organizations with the largest budgets tend to attract much of the best talent. Online giants like Amazon, whose recommendation engine is a standout example of the potential of big data, or new peer-to-peer companies like Uber with sophisticated data-driven models and large pots of venture capital, find it easier to innovate and stay ahead.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Smaller B2C companies need to ensure they overcome the skills shortage by adopting a variety of carefully targeted measures. Here the importance of arranging external or internal technical training for existing staff, and creating a data-driven culture in which analytics informs understanding of customer demand, should be underlined. This may mean turning to consultants or contract employees, at least in the short term, to build internal resources through the transfer of knowledge and expertise.

Overcome Security Challenges

Any commercial strategy that involves the collection and analysis of data is going to raise security concerns. The capacity to capture and analyze customer data is one thing, the technical expertise to keep this information secure is another. In an environment where any breach or loss of data can leave a business’s reputation irrevocably damaged, there is pressing need to invest in data encryption and information security, and for any security strategy to have broad support across the organization.


Trust and privacy concerns may persist, however. For these to be addressed, businesses need to adopt a raft of measures designed to establish and build trust. On the one hand, these will involve outward-looking measures to do with communication and transparency; but, on the other, these must be based on solid internal processes, including – but not confined to – the implementation of compliance mechanisms, codes of conduct and company values.

The Potential of Big Data and Analytics

Having outlined what it can take to make big data work, and suggested the challenges that must be overcome, we are left asking: ‘Is it worth it?’ A concrete example can help to illustrate the potential for big data to generate increased revenues and improved customer experience. Supply shortages, poor on-time delivery and inaccurate sales forecasts are significant problems for technology manufacturers, leading to bottlenecking and, ultimately, higher prices. By using big data and analytics to improve the sophistication and accuracy of sales forecasts, manufactures can ensure their products are consistently available and on-time, and at prices that are genuinely competitive.

By George Foot

Automation – Are We At Risk?

Automation – Are We At Risk?

Future Automation 

The automation of society is happening. Those who have read Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano know that it depicts a dystopia in which the economic system has made material abundance plentiful, but deprives the masses of meaningful labor. He shows us a future where all work is menial and unsatisfying, and where only a small number that achieves higher education is admitted to the elite and its work. This was in 1952.

mosheToday, researchers Frey and Osborne predicted in 2013 that 47% of US jobs were susceptible to automation by 2050. According to Moshe Vardi, Professor of Computer Science, Rice University, machines could take 50% of jobs in the next 30 years.

The automation revolution is occurring at revolutionary speeds, however, the impact on our society is being felt with mass unemployment and psychological aimlessness.

The automation revolution is upon us, though it will not happen without radical changes in the social conventions surrounding labor. As the machines eat up more jobs, the dystopia is real, as we fear the mass unemployment and psychological aimlessness. Our reaction will be to stall the third industrial revolution. We can look back on futurists like Vonnegut, and develop a sense of knowing of what is to come.

The Last Job on Earth

Alice shows us a dim future in which the automation revolution takes every last job we have. The dystopian society had become real, however there is no need to fear this sort of outcome. There are many solutions and outcomes that are real today, and show us a positive outlook for a bright future.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

One idea is to de-link work from wages. You can see this taking place on any business flight or Starbucks coffee shop. Everywhere you look there are men and women hunched over laptops and tablets, they are working under trees in the park, on buses, in front of the television. It’s a futuristic factory, they flip from work to emails, and nobody sets a timer. The new work strategy is to work to targets or goals, not time.

In order to properly de-link work from our wages, we would still need a standard of income. A combination of a universal basic income, paid out of taxation, and an aggressive reduction of the working day will unleash the automation revolution at jet speeds. As usual, Europe is ahead of the curve with Sweden cutting the workday to 6 hours, while Finland has already begun experimenting with a basic citizen’s income.

The ideas are similar to the ideas presented to us in Robert Heinlein’s For Us, the Living, where he depicts an automation revolution that results in an economic system known as the “Heritage Check,” which was supplanted by taxation. The shift was made possible by huge advances in technology and production capacity as machines continued to free up our time. It seems that again, science fiction has closely predicted our current state of ideas, and the automation revolution that is upon us.

Don’t Fear Automation

The news may be more unsettling that with current economic news. The fear in the headlines reads louder than the truth. According to reports millions of jobs are at high risk for automation. This isn’t just for blue-collar workers; computers are now taking over tasks performed by professional workers, raising fears of massive unemployment. As the cost of technology reduces or the price of human labor increases, the pace of job automation is likely to accelerate.


Those job areas where the tasks are manual or repetitive are more vulnerable than those that are in the creative, technical fields, or where strong interpersonal skills are required. At the same time, many new jobs are created that are directly due to automation that requires an individual to control. Technology has created far more jobs than it has destroyed and these new jobs are better paying and tend to be safer from the risk of future automation.

“As technology advances, it reverses the characteristics of every situation again and again. The age of automation is going to be the age of ‘do it yourself.’” Marshall McLuhan

By Tina Rose

How Is CISA Really Going To Affect Cybersecurity?

How Is CISA Really Going To Affect Cybersecurity?

CISA Cybersecurity

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and it was only a matter of time before the U.S. government came up with a new federal law concerning cybersecurity, since the last one, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, was defeated in the Senate in 2013. Last year was “the year of the breach”, which resulted in many cyber-attacks leading to the passing of a new federal law – the Cybersecurity Information and Sharing Act.

This law is said to greatly improve cybersecurity in the United States, but it actually faces a lot of opponents due to its vagueness. It is definitely going to affect cybersecurity, but in what way? Read on to find out what this bill represents and how it actually affects cybersecurity in the U.S.

What Exactly Is CISA

CISA, or the Cybersecurity Information and Sharing Act, is a U.S. federal law that is meant to improve cybersecurity in the United States by allowing technology and manufacturing companies to share information about cybersecurity threats with the U.S. government. It is a way for every company to share “cyber threat indicators” with government agencies and the Department of Homeland Security, in an attempt to fight hackers and prevent damage before it’s too late.

The collected data can be shared with any of the U.S. government agencies, including the NSA, the FBI, the CIA and many others. This bill protects companies from Freedom of Information Act requests by protecting them from any liability lawsuits for the harm done to their customers, due to the sharing of their private information, as long as they follow government guidelines.


What Do the “Cyber Threat Indicators” Include?

According to CISA, “cyber threat indicators” represent any information that is necessary for identifying threats and they include the following: the consequences of a cyber-attack, “malicious resonance”, that is, any spy software that can steal your passwords, network activity that shows security vulnerabilities, codes that can bypass your security measures, as well as “malicious cyber command and control” that can point to the source of the cyber-attack.

All of these indicators are pretty useful for fighting hackers and they show potential ways for improving cybersecurity. Another thing that this bill indicates is that companies can share any other information related to cybersecurity threats, unless it is not legal to share that information due to other laws. That is the vague and tricky part that makes everyone wonder whether this shared information will be misused.

Will CISA Leave Room for Privacy?

Apparently, the U.S. citizens can all say goodbye to privacy. That is the main reason why CISA has so many opponents, among which are some of the major technology companies, such as Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Wikipedia and many others. The greatest opponents include private companies that don’t engage in any nefarious activities and have literally no reason to be introspected and to provide the government with their customers’ private information.


CISA definitely leaves no room for privacy and, most importantly, it does very little to protect Americans from cyber-attacks. Instead, it greatly focuses on sharing Internet traffic and private information. Americans want real protection from hackers and cyber-attacks and all they got was a bill that threatens their privacy.

What concerns many people is the impact CISA may have internationally. The bill does not state that, of course, as it is designed only for the United States, but due to the fact that much of the world’s data flows through the U.S., American laws affect a much larger number of people than just those inside their borders. After all, the Internet is global.

That means that U.S. laws may not only apply to their citizens and that fact leaves the whole world in fear of their private information online, since CISA may give permissions for people who are not protected by U.S. laws. More importantly, this bill leaves many companies outside the U.S. very concerned about the privacy of their customers who happen to reside inside U.S. borders.

In a nutshell, the Cybersecurity Information and Sharing Act does not do much to improve cybersecurity, as it clearly should. Instead, it seems to be an effective way for the U.S. government to keep tabs on its citizens by having access to every private piece of information about them. Whether that changes eventually or not, only the future will tell.

By Pavle Dinic

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Future Realities

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Future Realities


By Chris Mirra,

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Aria Systems Raises $50 Million Investment Round

Aria Systems Raises $50 Million Investment Round

Cloud Billing Provider Attracting Strong Interest

Though the market showed some instability in the fourth quarter, investors remain bullish with regards to the continued growth of the cloud billing and recurring revenue market.

An Incyte Group report suggests that almost half of all US businesses currently have or are considering implementing recurring revenue offerings which, unlike traditional business models built around upfront fees or one-time transactions, focus on smaller, continual, subscription-based trades. This morning, top ranked cloud billing company Aria Systems announced a significant investment round in endeavors to accelerate the worldwide enterprise billing space to its expected 2020 mark of $14.8 billion.

Aria Systems Raises $50 Million Investment

Based in San Francisco, Aria Systems helps enterprises increase their recurring revenue through their cloud-based billing and monetization engine. Funding has already been secured from existing investors Bain Capital Ventures, Hummer Winblad Venture Partners, InterWest Partners, and Tom DibbleVenrock, and this new, fifth, major funding round adds investors including Rembrandt Venture Partners, Madison Bay Capital Partners, and Hercules Technology Growth Capital. Additional strategic investment has been provided by VMware. Says Tom Dibble, Aria Systems President and CEO, “This new investment round validates the huge market need for strategic monetization solutions. It also attests our tremendous success helping enterprises like Atlassian, Roku, and Zipcar go beyond billing to maximize recurring revenue streams and embrace innovative business models.” With a total of $50 million in new capital raised, it’s clear that investors recognize the accelerating global enterprise adoption of recurring revenue models. New enterprise customers include Atlassian,, Falck, LogMeIn, Sungard AS and Zipcar, and global expansion deals include Audi, Experian, Netgear, Philips Healthcare and Roku.

Ranging the Verticals

Providing success across a range of verticals including entertainment, tech, automotive, telecommunications, medical, and a variety of IoT feats, Aria streamlines the recurring revenue operations process, providing cross-functional teams the opportunity to more quickly take a larger assortment of offerings to market. Says Josh Crowe, CTO of availability and managed IT services provider Sungard AS, “Aria’s monetization platform allows us to reduce our time to market for new services without requiring significant additional development. With Aria, we can quickly leverage an expanded product catalog globally to ensure our customers can select the exact plan that meets their pricing and billing needs.”

From Strength to Strength

Forrester Research names Aria a leader in The Forrester Wave™: Subscription Billing Platforms, Q4 2015, and says Andrew Dailey, Managing Director of MGI Research, “With this latest infusion backed by an impressive investment roster, Aria is poised to be the category breakout in worldwide agile billing, whose total addressable market is expected to reach $14.8 billion by 2020. Satisfaction among Aria customers is high, and the company has progressively fortified its solutions to effectively and affordably scale within global enterprises across an array of industries.”

As new funding intensifies Aria’s sales, marketing, and development, the company strives to surpass 2015 successes which include an expanded partner ecosystem, a record number of “go lives”, an annual bookings increase of 145%, and an industry-leading 97% enterprise retention rate across Global 2000 enterprise customers. Says Cara Goodwin, Director of Purchases and Subscription at global SaaS leader LogMeIn, “Aria has proven it can handle the scale we need, and its dynamic product catalog provided a great way to support a wide variety of models, from high-volume transactional products to sophisticated and customized enterprise products.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Exciting Possibilities With 3D Printing Innovation

Exciting Possibilities With 3D Printing Innovation

3D Printing Innovation

An early vision of man’s interaction with machines beyond the internet of things.

Since the dawn of time, humans have manipulated the physical world around them into tools which they use to make life easier. In today’s world, the primary tool for most people is the computer and the staggering number and variety of tasks that it can accomplish. Yet, the way we interact with this tool has remained essentially the same – via a keyboard or a mouse and, more recently, a touch screen.

Sean Follmer, an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University and has been intrigued by this conundrum for a number of years. Speaking at a recent TED talk, he explains that “my belief is that we must need new types of interfaces that can capture these rich abilities that we have and that can physically adapt to us and allow us to interact in new ways.”

As the Internet of Things moves ever closer to a reality, some visionary scientists are seeing a world beyond when devices are connected and into a more fluid, adaptive spatial environment.

Follmer recently earned a PhD from MIT for his work in human-computer interaction that has given birth to an extraordinary technology called inFORM. What is inFORM? It’s an interface that can come off the computer screen and that you can manipulate physically. Whether it’s a 3D application, or digital clay which you can sculpt into a brand new shape, the elements on the surface rise up and are manipulated via actual, physical touch. “The idea is that for each individual application, the physical form can be matched to the application,” he says, “and I believe this represents a new way that we can interact with information, by making it physical.

Exciting Possibilities

New applications of this technology are being dreamed up all the time. Whether it’s in the arena of urban planning around traffic planning or spatial density, or tools for blind people, even new musical instruments, there are a wealth of possibilities that are becoming evident with inFORM.

One of the most astonishing demonstrations during Follmer’s TED Talk was the ability to render a person or an object remotely. Popular Mechanics magazine explains how “for this, the tangible media team decided to use a standard Xbox Kinect, a sensor typically used for motion-intensive gaming, to capture a person’s movement. A mounted projector also displays color.”


(Image Source: MIT/Popular Mechanics)

The ultimate effect of this is like seeing a person reach through a digital screen and manipulate objects on a table in another space. “Or you can have an object that’s linked between two places, so as I move a ball on one side, the ball moves on the other as well”, said Fowler at the TED Cern conference.

Over the next five years, many of the devices that we buy will be internet enabled and connected in ways that attempt to make our lives easier. But it is becoming easier to predict a time when devices themselves are obsolete, and the environment that we build and live in, takes on an intelligent and fluid dynamism that is likely to transform the globe in ways we are only beginning to imagine.

By Jeremy Daniel

CloudTweaks Comics
Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Three Ways To Secure The Enterprise Cloud

Three Ways To Secure The Enterprise Cloud

Secure The Enterprise Cloud Data is moving to the cloud. It is moving quickly and in enormous volumes. As this trend continues, more enterprise data will reside in the cloud and organizations will be faced with the challenge of entrusting even their most sensitive and critical data to a different security environment that comes with using…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

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Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

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Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…


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