Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Building A Winning Business With The Cloud

Building A Winning Business With The Cloud

Building A Winning Business

Momentum Ventures identifies successful business models and puts brilliant minds and natural leaders to work for amplified, competition-beating solutions. Deliberately focusing their innovation, the organization insists they are “not looking to reinvent the wheel”, but instead target thriving online industries that show no signs of decline. Their leaders are dedicated to absorbing the knowledge and skills in their environments, striving to carve out their own space, and they maintain that “passion is not optional”. With the online travel sector continually growing, Momentum Ventures has once again invested their enthusiasm and business processes into this industry with Alio.

Don’t Wait for Opportunity to Knock

Momentum Ventures CEO, Matt Keezer, discusses the initial consideration of the Alio opportunity. With the organization consistently exploring new opportunities for market and portfolio growth, he believes the expansion into the US market was their next logical move. “We know that our counterparts south of the border do very well, and we believed that we should enter once we felt that we could enter from a position of strength. With the experience of successfully launching FlightHub in Canada, we felt that the timing was right for us to take that next step and take on the American online travel space.”

Matt Keezer - CEO

Strategies & Development

Momentum Ventures is clear about the fact that they are not venture capitalists, owing to the belief that this investment space can typically be inefficient. With a team that feels connected to their work, Momentum Venture’s strategy is rather to invest in businesses and people in whom exceptional potential is evident. Says Keezer, “We take great pride in building all our businesses in-house in our Montreal office, and believe we have a lot to offer in terms of mentorship and business support services. At the end of the day, it’s about being hands-on with everything we do.”

Alio’s business unit leader, Peter LaPointe, points out that case studies and trials weren’t necessary for Alio’s business development, considering how much had already been learnt about the Canadian market and industry with the development and launch of FlightHub.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The potential in the US market for a full-service brand such as Alio was evident, and considering their wealth of experience, LaPointe affirms that Momentum Ventures was “comfortable going all-in with it.” With the future carefully mapped, the team built a successful strategy to exploit all likely potential, and of the progress of the overall development, LaPointe notes, “No surprises, really. We were well prepared to get into this marketplace.” The stable foundation of FlighHub smoothed the process and offered a tested strategy. Says LaPointe, “The only fundamental shift was that we decided to move onto the cloud using Amazon Web Services. That move allows us to scale our data needs as we grow, and helps avoid costly hardware expenses.”

Momentum Ventures has a host of successful businesses and a passionate team that continues to better and build their portfolio. Hop over to FlightHub Reviews for more details about this service, or if you think you might be their next leader, take a look at the Momentum Ventures Challenge for a chance to work with and be mentored by their winning team.

By Jennifer Klostermann

How Data Science And Machine Learning Is Enabling Cloud Threat Protection

How Data Science And Machine Learning Is Enabling Cloud Threat Protection

Data Science and Machine Learning

Security breaches have been consistently rising in the past few years. Just In 2015, companies detected 38 percent more security breaches than in the previous year, according to PwC’s Global State of Information Security Survey 2016.

Those breaches are a major expense — an average of $3.79 million per company, according to the Ponemon Institute. And Juniper Research forecasts that by 2019, data breaches globally will cost $2.1 trillion — four times more than in 2015.

Every year, global spending on cybersecurity has been growing. Gartner’s estimates put that spending at $75.4 billion this year. Despite those mounting expenses, attackers are still playing on the offense side, breaching through the defenses. Operating in a sophisticated, flourishing underground economy where they specialize and freely sell their goods and services, hackers are evolving much faster than the defenses can adapt to keep up.

Daunting Tasks

One major struggle for security teams stems from the lack of visibility and the information silos — especially as they try to sift through an increasingly large amount of IT security data sources. In most publicized breaches, the companies monitoring systems worked as they should, generating intrusion alerts. But the sheer number of daily alerts — along with the large number of false positives — makes the security analysts’ job daunting and results in ignored alerts.


Increasingly, more organizations are turning to data science to help in rapid detection of breaches and to enable more efficient response. Called user and entity behavior analytics, or UEBA (a term coined by Gartner), this science can bridge the gap that no human can — helping to prioritize and reduce the number of alerts.

UEBA works by creating behavior-based models for cloud services (both for users and entities) and then analyzing activity against those models. Because they’re based on machine learning, the models continuously adapt depending on user behavior, and do so without the computers needing to be overtly programmed. For example, peer groups can be created based on data sets such as company databases and directories, user profiles and common user activities. Through UEBA, statistical models are applied to detect, in the right context, anomalies beyond the login — using factors such as a user’s login volume based on historic logs.

The process can quickly identify patterns that deviate from the “normal” behavior. Through this machine learning, computers can solve complex problems that require rich-data exploration, in environments where software engineering and humans alone cannot be successful. As a result, the number of security alerts will not only be significantly reduced from millions a day to hundreds, but they can be further prioritized to a short list of top alerts.

Fintech Detection

An analogy for how UEBA can help companies is the system that credit card institutions have in place for detecting fraudulent transactions. Rather than automatically flagging every single transaction over, say $10,000, or every user with a large number of transactions — or any other static threshold — the credit card companies use behavioral analytics to spot unusual activities among the billions of daily transactions. In the same way, UEBA can sift through massive datasets to flag potential breaches.


For organizations, this ability is especially important as cloud use is exploding and security practices still a question mark. The average enterprise sees 2 billion cloud-based transactions daily, and the traditional breach-detection methods are not keeping up in this data-rich environment. UEBA can be used against factors such as service action, service action category, number of bytes uploaded/downloaded and rate/time of access of services across a service action or even an entire cloud service provider to identify behavioral anomalies. The UEBA can be customized for each enterprise based on time, rate, level of use etc.

One challenge in detecting anomalies in cloud use is the noticeable pattern variation that results from corporate policies as well as users’ personal preferences. If the actual usage is the only piece that can be observed, the user-behavior model is incomplete because it lacks unobservable components such as use variations during different times of day of different days of the week, or the evolution of a user’s preferences and patterns over time. UEBA connects the dots because it can predict future usage, leading to a more precise anomaly detection process.

Empowering Security

Security vendors are seeing the advantages of UEBA and beginning to integrate it into their products and services. Gartner forecasts that by 2017, at least 25 percent of the major DLP and SIEM providers will add UEBA capabilities either natively or through partnerships and acquisitions. That means companies will be able to bolster their security defenses and gain better visibility into their data, empowering their security teams with more robust, context-aware tools.

Although the human factor will never likely be eliminated in the fight against attackers, providing better failsafe mechanisms against human error through machine learning is a vital next step.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Sekhar Sarukkai

Wearable Tech And Employee Well Being

Wearable Tech And Employee Well Being

The Key To A Healthy Business

Wearable tech has effectively rewritten the terms and conditions of employee wellness programs. Organizations can now give employees fitness trackers as part of wider policies, using the data gathered over a given period to offer employees incentives and rewards. The appeal is two-fold: it nudges individuals towards healthier and more productive lifestyles; but it also helps organizations and their employees to save money. In an environment where the competition for the top talent is fierce, such employee wellness programs are increasingly important tools for boosting morale and building loyalty – but there are some caveats. The schemes have attracted attention because of the potential threat to employee privacy and job security, as well carrying implications for Big Data.

Million Step Challenge

In 2015, BP’s ‘Million Step Challenge’ has attracted a lot of media attention. Part of a larger wellness program and in partnership with StayWell, a third party health company, BP are offering employees the chance to use their healthy lifestyles as a way of earning benefits on their healthcare plan. Once employees enrol, they get a free Fitbit tracker to help them keep track of their daily activity, and with every million steps they earn 500 wellness points, or half of their annual target. Other ways of meeting the annual points target include scheduling an annual physical, participating in a financial wellness class and completing local BP-organized wellness activities. For staff who prefer to be more independent, there’s also a mail-based program, which provides them with resources, tools and activities to help them to be healthier and more active.

The Wearable Future


(Image Source: PWC)

The strength of the BP scheme, then, lies in the unobtrusive way that wearables are used to challenge, support and reward. That is to say, instead of imposing Fitbits on employees and monitoring their performance, they’re part of a voluntary scheme that has real advantages for employees and their family, nudging them towards a healthier lifestyle and saving them money in the process. Just as Fordism emphasized the importance of taking care of the worker to improve efficiency and loyalty, so wellness programs and wearable tech offer modern businesses a way of improving the health and morale of their workforce.

The Wearable Enterprise

In stressing the opportunities of wearable tech for enterprise, it’s important not to lose sight of the reasons people are worried. It may be easy to present a picture in which wearables are used well and with good intentions, but it’s also possible to think of misuses. What if companies were to monitor more than just steps? For example, wearables could also monitor employees’ sleep patterns or detect health conditions. This raises legitimate questions of what employers are entitled to do with the data, how securely they store it and where to draw the line between work and leisure.


As more and more companies are thinking about how to make wearables work for their employees, it’s clear they face a number of implementation challenges. A recent study by PwC showed a clear generational gap between Millennials and older employees, with 77% of those aged 18 to 24 saying they would be willing to wear a wearable device if a company paid for it, which suggests that workforces may also be divided along generational lines. To convince employees and stakeholders, businesses are going have to be able to provide firm reassurances about the way in which data harvested through the program will be used and, most importantly, secured.

At the end of the day, the use of wearable tech in business should be about promoting wellbeing; achieve this and employee loyalty and productivity will follow. That’s also why it’s so important to address the criticisms and concerns. After all, any scheme that’s resented by employees is doomed from the off. Employees need to be able trust employers to handle their data ethically and securely.

If a scheme is smart and secure, then, fitness trackers can be a simple and effective way of improving health, productivity and general wellbeing.

By George Foot

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Google It

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Google It


By Christian Mirra

Please feel free to share our comics via social media networks such as Twitter with a clear attribution (Twitter example: via @cloudtweaks) to the original comic source. If you are a company brand looking to utilize our comics to generate leads to a specific landing page, newsletter, presentation or social media campaign, you can contact us regarding commercial licensing rates. Enjoy!

Choice: A Critical Factor For A Successful Business

Choice: A Critical Factor For A Successful Business

A Critical Factor For A Successful Business

One of the most valuable business assets a company has today is its data. The problem is that most companies don’t know how to structure their information and then effectively leverage it to the benefit their organizations and their customers. Despite these challenges, there are now open, hybrid solutions (in the cloud and on premises) that have the unique ability to collect and analyze all of the unstructured data from companies, no matter what apps, devices, or storage are being used. To better plan for the year ahead, we took a look back at the 2015 trends around user interaction with company content.

One thing remained constant – diversity.

The following infographic shows employees used a variety of apps, devices, and storage this year to access and manage company information — more than we have ever seen before.

Applications & Mobility

Although consumer apps are extremely popular on mobile devices, business apps are primarily accessed via desktop. It is not because employees are not mobile, it is simply because today’s employees have more specialized roles. For example, construction workers who spend all day in the field will primarily leverage their applications from a tablet device. Meanwhile their colleagues on the design team, who are stationed at headquarters, will primarily leverage their applications via desktop computers. In some instances, employees even engage in specialized activities, where they may create content while in the office, but need to access it later while on-the-go. While this scenario only accounts for around 15% of employees, it is sizable enough for IT and management to consider.

Diversity Amongst Devices

While employees may be working from a specific set of approved applications, they use a variety of devices to access them. Although it has traditionally been seen as a Mac vs. Windows argument, in business today many different operating systems are being used to get the job done. Trends we have seen within subsets of our customers’ users this year are: R&D departments frequently working with Linux, sales teams tending to be more favorable towards Windows, and creative/marketing teams often collaborating via Mac OS. Again, the takeaway here is that businesses need to be able to support a variety of use cases and employee profiles. To do so, they must provide them with the ability to choose their own device, operating system, and even the specific applications they are most comfortable working with.

Browser Preference

When it comes to browsers there is no standardization or mandate from companies either. The data reflects that Google Chrome is the favorite this year, but there is still legitimate use of Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Safari. What’s surprising is that employees are significantly more fickle here than they are for other tools, like email or content editing solutions. They are willing to navigate through many windows across multiple browsers when interacting with their content – 40% using two or more at once.



(Image Source: Wikipedia)

In today’s technology-rich society, employees are easily customizing the way they work. While every organization may be different,, there is no denying that employee diversity is forcing IT to provide freedom and choice to their users. From devices and operating systems, to apps and services, it will be extremely important for companies to resist standardizing as it will ultimately hampers employees’ ability to work. Instead, IT needs to maintain visibility and control no matter what the employees decide to use and configure for their unique and varied workflows.

This can only be accomplished with an open, hybrid platform that can securely manage your information infrastructure and how it is being consumed and shared. Many cloud-only solutions aren’t able to provide this functionality for content, as they only have control of what resides in their stack. This inevitably forces users toward those content editing tools, which may be subpar in comparison to more popular apps on the market. Employees should be able to continue to work the way they want to, while your IT department safely manages the environment. No compromises required — just freedom of choice for IT and the organization.


By Isabelle Guis, Chief Strategy Officer at Egnyte


Isabelle is the Chief Strategy Officer at Egnyte, overseeing all global marketing, go-to-market, partnership and product strategies. She previously served as EMC’s vice president of Marketing for the Public Cloud Solutions Group and Enterprise Storage Division, driving cloud buyer and service provider segmentations, as well as messaging, product positioning and go-to-market strategies for the company’s core storage solutions. Isabelle has also held leadership positions at Avaya, Big Switch Networks, Cisco Systems, and Nortel Networks. She holds a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Supelec (France), and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Video Meetings And The Face To Face Conundrum

Video Meetings And The Face To Face Conundrum

The Face To Face Conundrum

Meetings have been a scourge on business productivity for many decades. British comedy genius John Cleese released a corporate training film back in 1976, entitled Meetings, Bloody Meetings, which not only became an instant classic, but spawned a sequel in 2012. The problems inherent in meetings are timeless and universal. And sadly, they take up way too much time. But things are changing.


Traditional Meetings Endangered Species List

A combination of factors now places the traditional meeting on the endangered species list. People no longer have the time or patience that they used to, and for the new generations of employees and managers who have grown up with sophisticated video gaming and unconstrained access to online resources, a tedious one-hour or longer meeting often fails to prove its worth. When that happens at the outset, engagement is sure to evaporate.

We have moved well past the era in which the only way to share ideas with a group of people was to corral them in the same room. Numerous options now exist from the good-old teleconference, to multi-screen video chat, through to virtual meetings using VR tools; but this leads to a conundrum: how important is physical presence to the efficacy of a meeting?

Many of us have participated in tele-meetings where Internet-based video conferencing– was available, but in which the participants still chose not to use the video component, opting solely for voice. For small meetings, this might be due to shyness or vanity – we don’t always look the way we want to, especially when working from home. There is also something decidedly disturbing about the “downwards glare,” where inexperienced video conference attendees look at the onscreen images of the other participants, rather than looking into their own camera. This creates an immediate sense of disconnection between people and points to the importance of eye-to-eye contact during discussion.

Body Language Cues

In multiple participant teleconferences, additional frustration comes about through the lack of body language cues, especially in regard to the rhythm of an actual conversation. We use facial or body gestures to signify comprehension of a point, as well as to signal our desire to speak. Such subtleties are lost when the visual component is missing or inadequate.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

This does not mean that virtual meetings should not happen – they should. In fact, they should happen more often, since they save enormous amounts of time and money, and can actually be more productive than their analog counterparts, in most cases. What is critical is that the chairperson of a virtual meeting delivers and enforces an updated set of rules that ensure optimum behavior and synergy.

Firstly, if a company has access to a high-end video telepresence setup – using good video cameras and a bank of screens showing the other participants, then book this well ahead of time. These types of premium virtual meeting rooms are generally available in large organizations with numerous offices locations. They are not available to everyone, but they are worth it, since they offer the chance to see other people as if they were sitting across the table from you, and the 3D sound and video quality is generally superb. When these are not available, a phone or VOIP teleconference can do just as well, but the rules must be adjusted accordingly.

Go for “visual” whenever possible. Humans place greater trust in people when they can see who they are dealing with. They can also read body language cues, and frame the dynamic of the conversation accordingly. Instruct participants to spend a few minutes preparing, prior to the call. This doesn’t mean calling the stylists and makeup artists in, is simply means just allowing adequate light and establishing a desired visual look.

Photo Op

If video is not possible or not desired, then ensure photos are available. This could be as easy as inserting participant’s pictures on the meeting agenda (sent by email or posted in a meeting space.) A photo is a more controlled version of a person’s image, and although it does not allow for visual cues, it still flavors the dynamic of the conversation in a more human way.


Set up a system for side chats. It is very disturbing when people need to make a side comment while another person is speaking. Whispering is impossible on a conference call, but texting is easy. Whether this is done through an onscreen conference hub, or just texting to each other’s phones, this is an essential component of meeting dynamics that reduces interruptions while boosting synergy. It can also be used as a way of “raising your hand to speak,” by texting the chairperson from miles away.

There will always be some occasions which necessitate pulling people physically into a room for a meeting, but these are becoming fewer and fewer. The technology exists to bridge the obstacles put up by distance, time and money, but what is needed now is a revised mindset, that focuses pro-actively on the dynamics of human communication, and curates the available technologies to achieve the meeting’s intended goal. This way, Mr. Cleese will not have to make another sequel in 2018.

For more on this topic, go to, sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

M2M, IoT and Wearable Technology: Where To Next?

M2M, IoT and Wearable Technology: Where To Next?

M2M, IoT and Wearable Technology

Profiling 600 companies and including 553 supporting tables and figures, recent reports into the M2M, IoT and Wearable Technology ecosystems forecast opportunities, challenges, strategies, and industry verticals for the sectors from 2015 to 2030. With many service providers looking for new ways to fit wearable technology with their M2M offerings in order to route the masses of data being collected, IoT service providers may receive service revenues of up to $231 billion by the end of 2020, suggesting a CAGR of 40% between 2015 and 2020.

The Status Quo

With consumer voice and data service revenues reaching a saturation point, mobile operators are looking for new avenues to increase revenue growth, and providing connectivity for M2M (Machine to Machine) devices could be the next big opportunity.


(Infographic Source: The Fow Community)

Devices such as connected cars, smart meters, and healthcare monitors are becoming more commonplace, encouraging growth in various associated industries, and M2M connectivity could provide multi-billion dollar revenue options for MVNOs, mobile operators, and service aggregators attempting to address these needs. Enabling network connectivity between physical objects, M2M boosts the IoT vision of a global connected network of equipment, sensors, smart devices, appliances and applications able to communicate in real time, and furthermore allows for the monetization of wearable technology.

What to Expect

This year, 72.5 million connected wearables were shipped, almost triple as many as shipped in 2014. With a compounded annual growth rate of 25.8%, total shipments of smart glasses, smart watches, activity and fitness trackers, people and safety monitoring devices, medical devices, etcetera, it’s forecast that this figure will reach 228.3 million units shipped in 2020. It’s expected that Bluetooth will continue to be the primary connectivity option in the future, and forecasts suggest that 17.8 million of the wearables sold in 2020 will incorporate embedded cellular connectivity – specifically covering the smart watch and people monitoring and safety categories.


With Apple quickly becoming the leading smartwatch vendor in 2015, competition is hitting back hard, providing attractive Android Wear devices from vendors such as LG, Motorola, Asus, and Huawei, while vendors such as Samsung and Pebble explore alternate platforms. By the end of 2015, it’s expected that 19.5 million smart watches will have shipped, a 353% year-on-year increase. Additionally noted by Johan Svanberg, Senior Analyst for Berg Insight, “This market development has not gone unnoticed by the traditional watch industry and several vendors including Fossil and TAG Heuer have presented smart watches of their own.”

Though fitness and activity trackers are currently the largest device category, in the next five years, improved devices available in different price segments will encourage adoption, and smart watches are predicted to become the primary category. New form factors and decreasing costs are, however, likely to enable dedicated activity and fitness trackers to reach 71 million shipments in 2020.

Already common in the medical and people monitoring sectors, connected wearables such as ECG monitors, cardiac rhythm management devices, mobile Personal Emergency Response Systems (mPERS), and wearable computers are likely to infiltrate new markets, thanks in part to low power wireless connectivity, miniaturized electronics, and cloud services providing a wider range of connected wearables such as notification rings, gesture wristbands, smart gloves, and smart motorcycle helmets. And though smart glasses shipments have been fairly small to date, promising use cases in both niche consumer segments and professional markets suggest smart glasses will become a considerable connected wearable device category by 2020.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Google Takes On Uber In Self-Driving Taxi Business

Google Takes On Uber In Self-Driving Taxi Business

Self-Driving Taxi Business

Google is turning its self-driving car team into a standalone company with a potential eye towards ride-hailing

Google and Uber may soon find themselves competing in the self-driving taxi business. Google is planning to make its autonomous vehicles unit a standalone business within Alphabet Inc. next year, reports Bloomberg. This new company would offer an on-demand car service similar to Uber, which is also researching self-driving car technology.

This new Alphabet company would first deploy driverless cars in places like college campuses, military bases, or corporate parks before rolling out to open roads. The car service could launch in areas such as San Francisco, Calif. and Austin, Texas first, Bloomberg reports. Google’s autonomous vehicles have already logged more than one million miles on public streets in those regions…

Read Full Article: Time

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The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Are CEO’s Missing Out On Big Data’s Big Picture?

Are CEO’s Missing Out On Big Data’s Big Picture?

Big Data’s Big Picture Big data allows marketing and production strategists to see where their efforts are succeeding and where they need some work. With big data analytics, every move you make for your company can be backed by data and analytics. While every business venture involves some level of risk, with big data, that risk…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence Supports Better Business Performance

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence Supports Better Business Performance

Cloud-based GRC Intelligence All businesses need a strategy and processes for governance, risk and compliance (GRC). Many still view GRC activity as a burdensome ‘must-do,’ approaching it reactively and managing it with non-specialized tools. GRC is a necessary business endeavor but it can be elevated from a cost drain to a value-add activity. By integrating…

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation Digital transformation is the acceleration of business activities, processes, and operational models to fully embrace the changes and opportunities of digital technologies. The concept is not new; we’ve been talking about it in one way or another for decades: paperless office, BYOD, user experience, consumerization of IT – all of these were stepping…


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