Category Archives: Education

Cloud Computing Courses And Advantages Explained

Cloud Computing Courses And Advantages Explained

Cloud Computing Courses and Advantages Explained

Cloud computing is the latest technology in the field of computers and Internet based services. This new technology has helped businesses and individuals to save data efficiently in a cost effective manner. The industry now seeks professionals who are well versed with this technology. The article sheds light on the importance of courses in this domain!

As we all know, the traditional way of building an IT environment is to buy servers, hardware, licenses and install the necessary software. All this is a long and expensive process, which implies a high demand for infrastructure and lengthy implementation cycles. This working model as we know it today is being replaced by new technologies, one example of which is Cloud Computing.Cloud Computing Courses

Cloud Computing is among the latest technologies in the field of Internet, which is set to make life extremely simple for end Internet users. However these systems are quite complex and require very highly skilled IT professionals to successfully develop, implement, administer and maintain them. The concept of cloud computing is modeled for the Internet user keeping the complexity of systems in mind. In cloud computing, the unimportant data taken up by the users is abstracted into a cloud type structure, thus helping to remove the unnecessary information and show only the important ones.

Cloud computing is a technology that allows both individual users and businesses to store files and programs remotely, instead of using hard drives and servers. In fact, today many people use cloud computing without realizing, either through work or through personal use. Some examples might be web-based email such as Gmail and Hotmail, communication tools like Skype, video sites like YouTube, along with sharing music.

The theory of cloud computing can be understood by arrange of application, but the best methodology of learning such a concept is pursuing cloud computing courses.

Pursue Online or Classroom Courses

The cloud courses can be taken in classrooms or online. The experts believe that classroom learning is always great to improve interaction with other candidates and the instructor. However, those who are already in a job or do not have time to attend classes, look out for online courses that they can pursue in their free time. Such online courses help the Internet savvy students to learn new information and satisfy their desire in learning.

Components of Cloud Computing

Cloud computing includes a number of courses, which include Utility computing, software as a service platform, e-commerce, web service and Internet integration. Such applications are offered by cloud computing online through the Internet browser, where the information gets stored in the Internet server.

Direct Comparisons of Courses

One should not be confused with other Internet concepts like utility computing, grid computing or autonomic computing, as such names sound similar, but are completely different.

Courses to be considered

There are a number of courses that teach the concepts of cloud computing, and include general computing concepts related to cloud computing. Such courses are suitable for Internet technicians and students who have a degree from any of the computer related fields. Cloud computing courses can also be taken up by the students studying in B-schools, as the knowledge about cloud computing helps in the expansion of businesses in a cost-effective manner.

Duration of the courses

The cloud courses are different from another. The knowledge and understanding of the subjects depends on your experience in the domain and the subject knowledge. The atmosphere where you are learning such things also has to do with the understanding of the subject matter. Depending on the choice of the course, the duration varies. Some of the courses last for a few days, while other for few weeks, and involve a series of presentations and seminars. Cloud computing courses also allow you to gain hands on experience by testing new computer skills in the cloud computing testing labs.

Advantages of the Cloud Computing

Quick: The basic services of the cloud work for themselves. For software services and more complex databases, cloud computing allows you to skip the hardware procurement phase and the consequent cost, making it perfect for business creation.

Updated: Most of the service providers constantly update their software and add new features.

Flexible: It allows rapid growth of the business, as the cloud system is designed to cope with huge workloads. This helps to reduce the risks and costs involved in the processes. While taking benefits of cloud computing, you have to pay only for what you are using.

Mobile: The cloud system can be used from a distance, so the staff of the company can have access to most systems wherever they are.

Economic: The provider offers services to multiple companies, which benefit from sharing a complex modern infrastructure and eliminating unwanted expenditure on infrastructure.

Continuity of operation: If a company is the victim of a disaster (hurricanes, earthquakes, or others.), the cloud computing helps the company from the hands of such disaster and it will not suffer IT infrastructure outage or loss of information.

Multiuser: Cloud computing enables multiple users to use the same application regardless of the physical location of where they are connected.

By Rashmi Karan

Rashmi writes on the behalf of, which is the leading education portal providing genuine and accurate information about the current education trends across the top ranking engineering colleges in India.

(Image source: Shutterstock)

Implications Of The Cloud In The Classroom

Implications Of The Cloud In The Classroom

Implications Of The Cloud In The Classroom

Cloud computing has been exciting people with its implications and opportunities especially so over the past several years, as more and more of the public have been exposed to the potential of this technology. While many people’s first experiences with cloud computing have revolved primarily around the digital sharing of music and video media, these same applications for cloud computing carry significant implications outside of the entertainment field. The classroom has become a major test lab for cloud computing and its potential to revolutionize educational, social, and economic systems that exist in society today. As more and more urban school districts continue to search for answers to stagnant test scores and high drop-out rates, cloud computing-powered classrooms have become the Holy Grail of most principals’ wish lists. While the obvious costs associated with the technological infrastructure needed to accomplish making this technology widely available, cloud computing remains a hypothetical solution in the minds of many teachers. However, as urban districts pump more and more money into upgrading their infrastructure and bringing cloud computing to every high school class, it is worth taking a look at the potential repercussions to academics as we know it. Three big questions that remain currently:

Aren’t teenagers already too distracted by technology?distraction-cloud

It really depends on who you ask. First, we need to rule out teenagers, who would certainly support the ability to bring their laptop, iPad, or smartphone to class to use. However, as any teacher working in a tech-heavy school can tell you, no manner of great lessons or interesting subject material can prevent the obvious teenage wandering to Facebook, Twitter, or the rest of the web. One thing that teachers have been clamoring for from tech manufacturers and software developers alike has been an intuitive education management system, which allows for functions like automatic screenshots and remote desktop controls. By giving the teacher the ability to monitor, control, and more importantly limit students’ ability to search specific sites or go off-task, cloud computing becomes a much more effective classroom tool, and much less of a potential distraction disaster.

Why would students need Google Drive and other cloud-based workplace collaboration software?

For the exact same reason professionals use it! From sharing documents and resources among each other during group projects, to being able to meet with a teacher and go over revisions remotely, to revision tracking and other important elements of teaching the editing process, the potential for cloud computing in the classroom is essentially limitless. And that’s just an English classroom. From Google Forms being used for everything from daily homework and class surveys, to Google Earth being used as the framework and platform for opening unit lectures, new educational uses for cloud computing tools are emerging at an incredible rate.

What tech company will become the preferred choice for educational cloud computing enthusiasts?

Currently, it is Google, Google, Google, and Google. While tech giants like Microsoft, Apple, and others continue to take swings and challenge the “Don’t Be Evil” giant, Google has made remarkable inroads into education policy and tech-for-the-classroom, far more so than its usual rivals. Urban districts around the country, which sit on tens of millions of dollars in funding for technology purchases and equipment, are being courted actively by Google for everything from software licenses, to free support for Google cloud services, to Chromebooks that can be bought cheaply and in mass numbers for entire classes and grade levels of students. While it is a sure bet that once other tech giants get wind of the money at play in this market sector they will make plays themselves, at the moment the standard for cloud computing in education is being set by Google.

By Adam Hausman

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Iowa Campus Swaps Telephone For Cloud VOIP

Traditionally, campuses would vaunt thousands of cell phone sets with equivalent switchboards and Iowa University has not been an exception to the rule, with its eight thousand handsets. Now, courtesy of cloud infrastructure that is creeping into its communication system, the institution of higher learning has a one-month marathon of trading old phones for VoIP-enabled devices. This means reducing the communication expenditure by six hundred thousand dollars per annum. This will also improve the way phone communication becomes an integral part of a larger network rather than just meaning a single device per office.

How the VoIP will Work

The university intends to replace telephone machines on the racks and bring in the cheaper yet efficient cloud calling system. The first advantage of the system is that it will forward, on an automated basis, calls to mobile devices of the staff. This will reduce the costly switchboard system of referencing with an operator. Secondly, the platform will upgrade the sketchy nucleus of communication in the campus. It will bring up a central calling ‘fabric’ as the management is referring to the platform. This will be the start of an integral web-based learning system which relies on one-on-one video or telephony connections.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Apparently, this will also be the beginning of overboard communication network with other campuses, courtesy of the cloud Internet provider that the university has hired for the transition job. The online company serves a consortium of two hundred and twenty United States’ institutions of higher learning, and tens of state-based and federal companies. Thus, the will oversee the embracing of not only an advanced communication system but one that brings in the community around, automatically.

The replacement, so far, is going ahead of its feasibility period. Though Iowa campus intends to swap the systems at a thousand handsets, each seven days, as of June 17, it has nevertheless already replaced more than that number for the cloud system. This would mean that it is likely that the new framework will soon be in use.

Though there will be an installation phase of Internet cables throughout the campus, it is through the magic of technology that this development will not have an effect on wireless installations in the halls of residence. Usually, many campuses around the United States allow uncharged internet on boarding rooms where the learners can use their phones to make calls over the web. The company at the center of the transfer will use its technical expertise to overcome interference hitches that can botch up existing communication lines.

The Iowa example is a brilliant manifestation of how Internet and cloud-based communication channels are rapidly taking over the traditional threshold of the telephone. Now, transitioning between a cell phone and the web during a voice call is an automatic function that requires no troubleshooting. The cloud aspect means more institutions and community centers can exchange data over the interconnected line without resulting to handsets on desks. Cloud systems where a single university offers its library database to a consortium of neighboring campuses has been in vogue in the US for the last decade. This is after the integration of VoIP, cloud servers and campus databases to facilitate library information at cheap rates, with 24/7 access.

By John Omwamba

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

The Onset Of The Mainstream Cloud School Already In The Offing

During the TedGlobal meeting that took place in Scotland in mid-June, it came out that the cloud system of education may be here to stay. This is after a professor who founded the initial unilateral cloud educational institutions in the world outlined his plans for a new financial award he has received from a Los Angeles tech group that has recognized his efforts. For Sugata Mitra, who lectures in the coal-rich region of the United Kingdom, learning, as a rule, has not altered for the past half a millennium and it was time cloud gave it the fifth gear

The Cloud School

Prof. Mitra has set up a quintet of such virtual educational institutions, a trio of which is in the Indian subcontinent and a dual in England. There is also a plethora of campuses around the planet that are taking his lead by using his software infrastructure to deliver seamless teaching with little tutorial interference other than a rare moderator. This reinforces the professor’s theory that the premise of the cloud educational point is to bequeath pupils a level of self-comprehension. This, in turn, eschews the traditional drawback of digesting what tutors instruct students.

One of the educational facilities that the icon of cloud schooling is concentrating on is in one of the hidden villages of the Indian subcontinent. This will be an offshoot of the 1 million-dollar award that he received in early 2013 to help finance his educational endeavors. According to him, the learning facility will stage a modern journey for the children of the poor regions of eastern India who will, for the first time, compete with their global peers.

A Visual Picture of a Cloud School

Far from common conceptions of what an educational institution looks like, the new cloud schools that are in the offing will resemble cyber pods. It will be an all-pane computer lab that will feature a single giant screen, to one side, to give the moderator a chance to feed in directly with a learner who wants assistance. This will happen through video-phone technology that is already available on the PC for free.

The moderator community will emanate from already advanced tutors online. There is already a platform that has been providing teaching assistance in both India and the United Kingdom that will chip in to help launch the new educational scheme. This, therefore, would seem to eradicate a start without human resource as happens in many capital-intensive projects.


The major drive of this cloud computing education system is to enhance the self-cognitive faculties of kids. They will become better organized.

Still, there will not be a dearth of the communal factor that enriches modern brick-and-mortar education. In lieu of letting pupils become islands unto themselves, the professor has already drawn a communal model for the Indian system. This will be the introduction of services by clubs for young people. Though their work is not yet comprehensive, at the start, these will be able to, among others, narrate tales online to their remote listeners.

The discourse on cloud schools comes at an interesting moment when two major cloud giants, Microsoft and Google are competing to win tutors’ and pupils’ hearts into their respective platforms. This comes from the understanding that many educators are at the crossroads of which applications between the two companies suit them best. This may be healthy for the future of cloud-based education in the future, considering that independent platforms like that of the professor are already making a mark in the sector.

By John Omwamba

The Cloud Comes To Research Papers

The Cloud Comes To Research Papers

The Cloud Comes To Research Papers

Advances in cloud computing have been grabbing headlines and exciting tech lovers more and more frequently over the past few years.  But much of the focus on advances in cloud computing has centered in the corporate sector (data sharing and storage capabilities, information processing systems) or in the entertainment sector (streaming music and video services et al.).  While these areas do command the majority of the attention when it comes to what’s innovative in cloud computing these days, one area that is seeing a rapid influx of cloud computing is the high school classroom.

While many schools are still limited, through funding gaps or other factors, in the technologies they can offer to most students, a rapidly growing number of schools are jumping on board with various cloud computing services as new solution to a number of timeless problems in the classroom.  For both teacher and student, cloud computing is rapidly becoming a new method of communication, assessment, and assignment completion, on a daily basis.

The 21st Century English Classroom


Perhaps nowhere are the effects of cloud computing felt more thoroughly than in the high school English classroom.  Long a place that has resisted technological innovation and adaptation (it is the place of Shakespeare, after all), intuitive English teachers around the country are only beginning to tap into the potential for introducing cloud computing programs like Google Drive into their own instruction and projects.  From daily reading checks (fill out this Google Form with your answers, kids!) to the bane of many English students’ lives, the research project, many of the common practices of the traditional literature or composition classroom are being transferred into the cloud.

What problems does this solve? For starters, student organization and accountability.  With revision histories that track edits, teachers can actually visualize a student’s writing process, sometimes as it is happening live.  This allows for active “coaching” of writing and grammar, a process that would otherwise not be possible in a traditional lecture setting.  Aside from the ability to communicate and collaborate during the drafting of a paper, students can also store everything from sources, to works cited or bibliographies, to drafts of their paper together in their Drive folder.  This allows them to work on any of those elements either at school or at home, removing the possibility of materials being left at one place or another.

Repercussions Outside the Classroom

The advances in the classroom are just one part of the story, however.  Perhaps the bigger implication in the explosion of cloud computing in American education is the massive new market it would open to heavyweights like Google (who has been taking significant steps to monopolize the market already) and Apple.  This has further added to the rumbles surrounding Apple’s recent struggles, as CNBC recently noted. From the portable music player, to the smartphone, to the tablet, these companies have battered each other senseless and knocked out countless also-rans along the way (Blackberry, anyone?) and seem geared toward a collision in bringing cloud computing services to schools across America.  It is an interesting situation to watch develop, and the surprises should rival the rapidly growing instructional uses and organizational systems enabled by cloud computing being put in place in classrooms across the country.

By Adam Hausman

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

The initial promise of cloud generated a lot of excitement particularly in the test and development worlds. It was easy to use and just as easy to dismiss. Although that gave way to disappointment as early adopters discovered most if not all of the familiar old problems around administration, networks and performance applied to the cloud as much as dedicated. With most first generation cloud platforms adopting iSCI-based storage platforms, performance particularly stood out as an issue, and it became accepted opinion that cloud could never outpace dedicated equipment. Is that still the case? A third party benchmark test on seven leading cloud platforms using a dedicated server sheds some interesting light on the discussion

As cloud moves from being a bleeding edge technology to a more common place service tool, it’s still common to find IT professionals assuming that cloud performance simply cannot match up to that of dedicated hardware. Early experiences with cloud platforms have left many with sub-optimal experiences, and there is a widespread view in the market that high IOPS applications are best left in-house.

Are your four cores the same as mine?

To understand the origins of this belief, remember that the cloud was created as a tool for testing and development. As its adoption spread, and excitement over its potential grew, developers and then businesses put more and more demands on their cloud environments.

This led to a natural, if not unfortunate, dynamic at the commodity end of the market. With a focus on expanding profit margins and controlling expenditures, many businesses decided to trim costs around the biggest single expense of a cloud platform — the back end. The short-sighted decision to save money by using cheap storage systems led predictably to subpar performance – which in turn led to some of the more publicized outages in recent years.

Another factor is a lack of standardization. A recent study that benchmarked the performance of major players in the IaaS space discovered a wide variance in specifications. For example, with a common instance type of 4 cores/16GB, the variance between one provider and another can be as much as 50 percent. This means some specifications can be misleading to the point of being meaningless. If one platform performs at only 50 percent rate of its neighbor, then twice as many resources must be provisioned.

In another example of unreliability, commodity cloud players with iSCI in the back end have an ethernet hop in their infrastructure that inevitably slows down performance. As a result, applications that require high IOPS don’t function smoothly on those platforms. This results in the classic trade-off of price versus performance.

All of which means, that potential buyers must do thorough research on cloud platforms to understand what they will actually deliver. A detailed analysis of a platform’s technologies is essential before making a sizeable investment. It’s a pity that so few cloud providers share the details of their infrastructure with end users, or allow them to audit their platforms. While commercial secrets may be kept and embarrassing details hid, it means that IT providers have to use the rumor mill to make decisions about where they host their applications.

You get what you pay for

Given the background of some cloud performance issues, some IT pros might be surprised to hear that cloud platforms can outperform dedicated servers. But they can – and there’s even third party data proving that shared technologies can compete with and even outclass dedicated hardware. The platforms simply have to be built with performance in mind and managed correctly.  Of course its still true that with several platforms, if performance is an issue, using dedicated can be the better option. But why don’t all cloud providers offer competitive performance?

The answer is roadblocks. The two most common obstacles work in tandem — expense and the relentless race to the bottom. When providers like Amazon and Google  prioritize offering low-cost services, they must cut costs elsewhere to enable those offerings – and those cuts often mean a failure to invest in the proven technologies needed to provide high performance. As a result, users eager to find an economical platform will often experience weak performance.

To “re-brand” cloud environments as reliable, speedy and secure, providers must invest the capital necessary to build an optimal, high-quality platform. Only then will they deliver the performance their customers deserve. This puts cloud providers who have already built out low cost storage in a bind. Should they rip out their existing infrastructure and replace what they have with high-end technologies such as fibre channel? The disruption is prohibitive and the cost would surely have to be passed onto the user. When a customer can leave with little or no notice, it would risk the business. So it is unlikely that we will see a wholesale rebuild of a platform any time soon.

Is it game over for dedicated?

Inevitably there will be applications that do not run well in the cloud. For instance, some proprietary big data applications more or less have to be run on dedicated servers. Customers like to stick with habits and suppliers too, which will keep dedicated around for some time. Look at how many mainframes are still deployed. But for the most part, the choice is obvious. Just take a look at the latest round of financial results from hosting providers. The numbers paint a picture of a flat or barely growing dedicated hosting customer base and revenues. Meanwhile cloud revenues and momentum grow inexorably.

By Daniel Beazer

Daniel Beazer has an extensive history of research and strategy with hosting and cloud organizations.  As director of strategy at FireHost, Daniel Beazer oversees interactions with enterprise and strategic customers. In this role, he identifies pain points that are unique to high-level customers and utilises his significant knowledge of cloud computing and hosting to help them. 

Move Over Brick And Mortar, Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

Move Over Brick And Mortar, Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

As Bob Dylan once said, “the times they are a-changin’.” Its a verse that sticks like glue in the back of my mind when I reflect on the technology landscape today. Just a few years ago, data analytics services were few and far between and cloud computing unheard of. For example, cloud-related spending was only 4 percent of the total IT market in 2009, but according to IDC this is expected to increase by 12 percent — equaling $55 billion — by 2014.

Technology is advancing at a rapid pace. What is innovative today will become old news before you can bat an eye. Systems like the cloud will continue to evolve and adapt as technology advances. As businesses strive to remain competitive, it is the IT specialists supporting the transition from old to new technology that are the hamsters caught spinning the wheel. How do you as an IT professional stay up-to-date with the newest technology while retaining a firm understanding of past software?


If you’re working in IT, one thing you can be sure of is your job will never get boring. With a career devoted to keeping networks and systems humming, you’ve dedicated yourself to a lifetime of continuous learning to stay on top of the latest trends and technology.

Fine-tuning skills and brushing up on certifications has always been part of the IT job description, but in recent years this is becoming less of an option and more of a requirement. To give some perspective: imagine getting your B.A. degree to find out three months later you have to go back to earn another degree and yet another six months after that. IT jobs demand the ability to grasp new technology quickly, and hiring managers are clamoring for people that can master this challenge.

According to the Department of Labor Information, technology employment is expected to grow between 18 to 26 percent for all occupations through 2014. There is a massive growth opportunity in IT that shows no sign of slowing down. Yet, hiring managers struggle to find skilled candidates that are versed both in legacy systems and new technologies like the cloud.

Until recently, the options for IT professionals to hone their skills were limited and often expensive. It’s a challenge that has plagued professionals in the industry for years: how to keep up with a constantly evolving field while juggling a full-time job. In the past, the only answer was time-consuming seminars and costly brick-and-mortar courses. Fitting a career, family and other obligations into the mix make these options less than desirable.

Lately, we’ve seen several companies break down traditional education barriers to provide a viable solution., Treehouse and my own company TrainSignal are transforming the very foundation on which technology education is built — after all, shouldn’t education be just as innovative as the technology it supports? The flexibility and affordability makes online options appealing, but it’s the real-time capabilities that make it ideal for those working in technology.

Skills that might take months to grasp in classroom curriculums, can now be mastered in a matter of weeks or even days with online platforms. These courses are up-to-date and can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. That means a cloud engineer can brush up on the latest VMWare or Microsoft fundamentals during a moment of free time at work or during a long commute.

If you are a technology professional, the cloud is not just where you work, it’s where you can learn everything you need to know to have a successful career. Whether you are looking to learn how to build an app, spruce up your design skills or take a refresher course in virtualization, online resources are becoming widely available in all areas of technology. It won’t be long before we see that “the times they are a-changin” towards a more skilled, self-educated workforce across all industries.

By Scott Skinger, CEO & Founder, TrainSignalScott Skinger_TrainSignal (1)

Scott’s passion for IT education began when he passed his first certification to become a Novell CNA. Scott went on to teach at several technical schools where he realized traditional IT education was not providing students with the skills they needed to succeed. In 2002 Scott founded TrainSignal, a leader in IT education providing training courses to professionals worldwide. Scott earned a degree from Northern Illinois University in Dekalb, IL and serves on the advisory board of Salute Inc.

How Is The Cloud Transforming Employee Learning

How Is The Cloud Transforming Employee Learning

The pace of business change is unrelenting in the era of the cloud computing. As businesses adjust to this new world, the learning & development role is becoming increasingly crucial as the number of employees and their associated demands grow in form and complexity.

Take a moment and think about the ways in which transport was changed by technology. Only a hundred years ago we use to travel with the aid of horses and carts. Nowadays, we can get into any corner of the world in a day or less. Our world is changing so fast that it’s even hard to keep track of it at times, and this shift happens not only to transportation. Workplace learning has been highly transformed by the rapid improvement in technology, and this change is set to continue. From evolving LMS’s (learning management systems) platforms, to on-demand content strategies, businesses are more willing than ever to increase the adoption of alternative learning means. Tools such as e-Learning, m-Learning and other training avenues are becoming more and more preferred over the traditional training classroom.

When the cloud hit the hosting market, everyone was amazed by its capabilities. However, its capacities are helpful not only for server backups and secured file transfers. Below we’ll show you the 6 most important ways in which the cloud is changing workplace training and employee learning:

A self-service environment

Nowadays, learners want to be in charge of their own experiences. As a result, the focus is shifted from prescriptive learning to a model where the learner decides what he wants to learn in his own order. Monolithic courses that are delivered through an LMS fail to meet the requirements of new learners. It would be a lot better to just break the content into small parts instead, and placing them in the cloud where learners can access it at the moment they need them.

An interactive learning experience

The mobile devices which are hastening cloud’s performance more than any other ones are the tablets. Through tablets, anybody can experience a real work/learning environment that’s available regardless of their location, benefiting from an improved content consumption and productivity.

A simple converting of textbooks into PDFs or the ability to access an LMS on a tablet doesn’t meet the requirements of new learners anymore. With tablets, the touch-based gestures are capable not to provide reach user interactions, but also to create contextual awareness, thus enabling users to access key information and data from the cloud at any time. The training content available in the cloud should keep pace with the tablets’ vast capabilities.

Add to that the options of online social and collaborative learning (see more below), and employee learning is more interactive than ever before.

Learning possibilities on any device and platform

Due to the fact that learners now use a multitude of devices and associated operating systems, with no one being able to tell which the primary hub is, learning content should be fit for all forms of devices.

This presses learning organizations to fasten things up and accommodate their content with all platforms on the market. It no longer counts how fast a designer can author a course, what it matters now is how fast that content can be reproduced for all devices available, and even for those which hasn’t hit the market yet.

Social authoring

Employee learning is gaining an increased importance thanks to the mobile and social media use, and with the arrival of cloud-delivered content things are to change forever. Learners will soon be sending a constant feedback stream from the social networks and other apps back to the cloud. The ones which will assimilate this feedback will be the designers, which are to create continuous updates of training content in a timely manner. Given all these, the monolithic course content stored on the cloud will be accessible to learners at any time and from any device. What’s more, designers will focus on creating learning experiences instead of dictating the contents’ consumption. Thus, learners will benefit from a personalized training with powerful support.

Blended learning

The days of initial classroom training sessions representing the entirety of workplace training are over.  What we see increasingly more nowadays is blended learning, that is a framework which combines classroom training with informal education, both inside and outside the office.  Given that training assets are stored in cloud, tablets will gain the ability to become fully-blended learning environments. Learners are already able to download training material from the cloud to their own tablets at any time, giving them the ability to navigate through text, audio, video and many other interactive assets for a more efficient and personalized training experiences.

Enhanced connections

Learners’ requirements have shifted rapidly and dramatically. Having the unprecedented adoption rate of smartphones and tablets in mind, coupled with the mobility, accessibility and performance offered by the cloud, we can assume that we have already entered in a new learning era. From content development to instructional design, the old approaches of training simply cannot suffice any longer.

People are seeking enhanced ways of connecting to one another and learning things on the go, and only cloud is able to offer all these. Businesses and organizations who understand these things and act quickly are the ones who will gain a competitive edge over the others.

By Jason Silberman,

Marketing Director at WalkMe™ and lead author and editor of Training Station, a blog dedicated to news and ideas on training, learning and organizational development.

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Part 1 – Connected Vehicles: Paving The Way For IoT On Wheels

Part 1 – Connected Vehicles: Paving The Way For IoT On Wheels

Connected Vehicles From cars to combines, the IoT market potential of connected vehicles is so expansive that it will even eclipse that of the mobile phone. Connected personal vehicles will be the final link in a fully connected IoT ecosystem. This is an incredibly important moment to capitalize on given how much time people spend…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Paying Attention To Data Security Your biggest data security threat could be sitting next to you… Data security is a big concern for businesses. The repercussions of a data security breach ranges from embarrassment, to costly lawsuits and clean-up jobs – particularly when confidential client information is involved. But although more and more businesses are…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Speed, flexibility, and innovation require multiple cloud services As businesses seek new paths to innovation, racing to market with new features and products, cloud services continue to grow in popularity. According to Gartner, 88% of total compute will be cloud-based by 2020, leaving just 12% on premise. Flexibility remains a key consideration, and…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…


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