Category Archives: SaaS

Cloud Tools To Help Develop Your Business Startup

Cloud Tools To Help Develop Your Business Startup

Useful Business Startup Tools

Cloud tools and the cloud market are evolving from a focus on technology to solution-specific instruments with practical objectives. Ten years ago, businesses were run almost entirely from local office computers with files and documents being emailed forward or handed over on CDs. Today, for every task that once was bound to a local desktop computer, there’s a cloud-based solution that’s streamlined and accelerated the chore. Initial take-up of technology tends to be slow as people learn new software and migrate processes, but the power of the cloud ultimately makes business management, not to mention life in general, easier. Luckily, the newest cloud applications are easily integrated with straightforward interfaces, providing scalability and effortless evolution.

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Included are a few simple and useful tools to help get you started and on your way.

Admin & Project Management Tools

Anaplan

Anaplan’s “planning cloud” provides a scalable solution for planning needs. With its multi-functionary platform, this tool caters to sales, operations, HR and finance business zones. Says Sue Barsamian, SVP of Indirect Sales, Enterprise Group, HP, “HP is committed to making the sales process as seamless and effective as possible for our partners and our internal sales force… We use Anaplan to help us manage and optimize resource and sales quota deployment in real-time.”

Basecamp

This cloud-based project management tool offers web and app access and allows users to break projects down into tasks, threading related discussions between team members while providing file sharing, date tracking, and daily recaps.

SpiderOak

Promising 100% data privacy thanks to zero knowledge of user data, SpiderOak is a cloud-based sync tool able to sync just about anything, while additionally providing backup and sharing facilities.

Collaboration Tools

Asana

Asana Replaces clunky communication and statusing tools and offers project-specific platforms or workspaces. Individual projects can be created within workspaces to house tasks, and updates, task revisions, notes, and messages, are streamed to a dashboard via the cloud.

Do

Taking the contradiction out of ‘productive meetings’, Do’s visual timeline of meetings, agenda tools, and follow-up tracking ensure efficient team collaboration. Users can also add notes and store documents and presentations with this app available for both desktop and mobile devices.

Mural.ly

A cloud whiteboard that allows users to visually organize their thoughts and gather insights into one space. Features include sticky notes, team projects, and real-time collaboration, and Mural.ly works with Evernote, Google Drive, SlideShare, Vimeo, and YouTube. “Create a clear understanding of your design vision in order to direct the steps you take toward a solution or output.

Security & Monitoring Tools

Pingdom

Everything you need for website monitoring,” Pingdom lets users supervise their servers via the cloud. Providing uptime and response time reports, alerts can be set up to use text, email, and Twitter, and this tool further offers root-cause analysis while handling multi-step transactional monitoring and the ability to check multiple locations, all from one user-friendly dashboard.

Zoho Vault

An online password manager for teams, Zoho Vault lets teams stay connected and secure. With safe password sharing tools allowing variable access privileges, AES-256 encryption, and action tracking, teams have access to in-depth reports tracing user access while ensuring a protected work environment.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Hybridization: The Executive Roundtable

Hybridization: The Executive Roundtable

Hybridization

When discussing migration to the cloud, the use of hybrid cloud and all other cloud-related issues, people generally place the focus on the technology itself. What sometimes gets overlooked is the group of individuals who are — or at least, should be — responsible for the precise and successful integration of cloud into a company’s lifecycle. Many people should be sitting at the table for this discussion.

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Because the cloud is largely an IT issue, many companies like to defer the entire package to the IT department. But the IT people should not be the only ones involved. Cloud is just too big, and too all-encompassing, for any one group to shoulder the responsibility. Most IT managers would readily agree to this.

Roundtable Specialists

To this end, an organization should consider a roundtable of specialists, carefully chosen and capable of contributing their particular expertise to the ongoing policy of cloud integration. Ideally, this group should consist of the following, listed in no particular order:

A project manager. A qualified individual who can create and update a project plan and timeline, and make it available to the entire team. A project such as cloud migration requires competent and professional oversight.

People who understand the terminology. There is a great deal of new and sometimes confusing terminology that can offset, delay or just obscure the migration project. This individual must be capable of clearly understanding and translating cloud terminology to the rest of the group, using strategic language.

A person or people capable of identifying, researching and interviewing trustworthy cloud service providers, and creating and maintaining an updatable database of existing suppliers.

People who have a direct connection to the end user, both internal and external. If cloud-based technologies result in a change in performance or usability, then the team needs individuals who can oversee and guide this transition, and most importantly who can listen to the end users.

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

A coordinator of shadow IT. Given that most IT departments are already very busy, a shadow IT department, or project-specific group, may be required. Such a team must integrate with the existing IT matrix to ensure clear communication and collaboration, and to balance loads as needed.

A cloud security specialist. Cloud security is a slightly different animal from regular IT security. Cloud security professionals work in conjunction with internal IT security, but are becoming more specialized and certified, in order to deal with the ever-increasing number of threats. This type of specialist could be an external vendor or an internal employee.

A cloud backup/transition specialist. Numerous experts in the cloud field recommend that migrations happen over a series of steps, rather than a general move, and that there always be an “Undo” option that allows quick backtracking to a previously saved state, should something go awry.

A real-time metrics analyst. In the age of cloud, real-time data is king. Cloud-based applications – from customer-facing commerce through to back-end administration – need to be carefully monitored, using the easily available data that digital technology provides.

A specialist in comparative intelligence. Cloud and its related online digital technologies change very quickly. The competitive, global economy allows for new companies to enter the race, sometimes offering a better, more sophisticated approach to sales, fulfilment and every other element of commerce. An individual tasked with the role of constantly observing the competition in the field is essential.

An HR or training specialist. New technologies bring change into an organization. Employees do not always welcome change. In some cases, they will resist and even try to sabotage new techniques that cause fear and insecurity. The specialist from HR or corporate training is an essential player at the table to ensure that new developments are introduced and massaged into the organizational culture, comfortably and proactively.

A neutral mentor. Mentors are an important component of individual professional success, and they should also be part of a company’s ongoing life. A neutral guide sitting at the table can provide wisdom, experience and advice, while not holding a vested interest.

Cloud-savvy legal advice. The global nature of cloud serves up a large palette of legal issues, ranging from compliance to content, and demands up-to-date awareness and guidance.

This makes for a very large table indeed. It is not necessary for these and other members of management to physically sit at an actual table, but it does require ongoing and regular communication even if done virtually. A large team is still manageable, especially when each individual has their specific, clearly defined role. This will allow for the clarification of some obvious but often overlooked must-haves, such as the organization’s mandate of what “cloud” actually means.

With so much of a company’s life force moving to the cloud, this small, coordinated army of specialists is critical in advising senior management in every area of cloud strategy.

For more on this topic, go to http://businessvalueexchange.com, sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

By Steve Prentice

Does Slack Live Up To The Hype?

Does Slack Live Up To The Hype?

Does Slack Live Up to the Hype?

Slack’s the definition of a business success story. In just a couple years, it’s evolved from a gaming company’s internal communication tool to a globally used platform that was last valued at $2.8 billion. The popular collaboration tool, dubbed “social media for business,” first made an appearance on the tech scene in August 2013 and has since raised over $320 million in venture capital. Slack’s also something of a media darling, maintaining mainstream attention with multiple headlines that loftily proclaimed the service would sink email once and for all. Almost a year has passed since the New York Times published their article, however, and email’s not dead just yet. Is Slack really all it’s cracked up to be, or is it possible that Slack remains in the limelight thanks to high-profile users and investors?

What Is Slack?

Slack is a collaborative messaging and file-exchanging application tailored for businesses. A single team’s page is comprised of channels, or conversation threads, that can be dedicated to projects and specific subjects. There are two kinds of channels: open and private. Open channels are visible to the entire team, while private channels are better suited for topics that deal with sensitive work or just a few group members. In addition to channels, Slack users also have access to direct messaging, which allows team members to have one-on-one conversations. File sharing can occur in channels and direct messages alike, with a limit of 1GB per attachment.

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Users can access Slack via their browsers or through the dedicated desktop and mobile apps. The free version is available for an unlimited number of users, but Slack also offers two paid plans: Standard ($6.67 per user per month) and Plus ($12.50 per user per month). Additional features include unlimited service integration (the free version caps at 10), access to usage statistics, and Google Authentication. A third option, Enterprise, will debut this year and provide users with organization-wide analytics, increased security measures, and increased accessibility for the company’s IT department.

Who Uses Slack?

Regardless of your personal opinions on Slack, you can’t deny that it’s championed by well-known companies. Airbnb, BuzzFeed, Ebay, LinkedIn, NASA, Samsung, Urban Outfitters and The Wall Street Journal are just a few names off of Slack’s customer list.

In everyday terms, Slack has stated that the application serves roughly two million daily active users, and 570,000 of those have paid accounts. That’s a significant jump from 16,000 users in early 2014. Unsurprisingly, the city with the most users (worldwide) is San Francisco, followed by New York and Tokyo. Its investors include Accel, Andreessen-Horowitz, Index Ventures, KPCB Spark, and Social Capital.

What’s So Great About Slack?

Slack’s major selling point is the diversity of its third-party integration options, now compiled into a curated app directory. Most recently, Microsoft announced that users would be able to make Skype calls within the Slack app. There are 160 other applications featured in the directory, with the top five being Google Drive, Google Hangouts, GitHub, Trello, and Twitter. The variety works in Slack’s favor, as heightened integration opportunities increase the chance that a potential user will incorporate the platform into an existing workflow. And Slack isn’t stopping there. The company teamed up with its investors back in December, pooling resources in an $80 million investment fund that will go towards continued development of new app integrations. Other notable features include a completely searchable message archive and the ability to create a custom bot that has certain roles within your team’s page (such as programmed reactions or channel monitoring).

What’s Not So Great About Slack?

Maybe it’s a little obvious, but Slack is a venue of communication solely for you and your team. You’ll need to use email, Skype, or some other messaging tool to talk with anyone outside of your company, which means toggling between platforms or pages. Additionally, there are no task management features built into Slack. Users must integrate a third-party app to provide that function or just go without. Furthermore, some app integrations can lead to a confusing workflow, because the integrations only record actions from third-party apps; replies to those actions in Slack do not write back to the integrated apps. Reviews have also mentioned that the app has a default tendency to over-notify. Slack provides a less noisy, “recommended” notification setting as an alternative, but users can run the risk of missing out on important messages in this case.

Final Thoughts

It’s doubtful that Slack will ever replace email completely, but company cofounder and chief technology officer Cal Henderson has personally acknowledged that eliminating email altogether was never Slack’s intent. “Email is so ubiquitous that there’s no way to replace it,” Henderson said in an interview with Forbes. “…Slack isn’t supposed to replace email. It’s supposed to replace internal company email, which is a much more tractable problem.” Overall, it’s true that Slack serves its purpose as an internal communication tool—there are two million users who would agree.

By Leo Welder

Key Insights: The Future of Mobile Commerce

Key Insights: The Future of Mobile Commerce

The Future of Mobile Commerce

Today, mobile is ingrained into our daily lifestyles. From communication to commerce, transactions are instantaneous – and continue to become even more convenient. Here, we’ll take a look at the latest mobile innovations as well as predictions for where mobile is headed in years to come.

M-Commerce in 2016

Mobile devices are now much more than phones; they’re, virtually, portals to the ideal user experience. It’s no surprise that retailers are taking advantage of the accessibility and convenience that only mobile can provide.

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Here are some of the latest innovations:

Convenience – With click-and-collect, customers can make their shopping decisions ahead of time. This increases spending because once the customer arrives near their desired product in-store, they almost always buy something else. Many retailers are now allowing all store locations to ship to the customer’s home and letting customers manage their points and offers via mobile. Integrating any digital touch points that might be used in-store enables customers to buy via mobile and pick up in-store. Stores can send notifications on mobile whenever an order is ready for in-store pickup.

Proximity technology – Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Beacons, Near Field Communication (NFC), and QR codes allow retailers to engage with customers via their smartphone. Mobile payment technologies, such as Apple Pay, are already using this type of innovation. E-commerce giant, PayPal, hopped on the mobile-pay train with its acquisitions of Paydiant and digital wallet Venmo.

Rewards – Mobile-based loyalty programs make it easier to redeem rewards and also enhance the consumer experience. Many consumers today use Wallet to keep their coupons and loyalty cards in one place on their iOS device and will soon be able to pay using the app, as well. Retailers that provide customers with a mobile app experience should update the app’s barcode screen so that available rewards, offers, and coupons will be displayed. Check out VoucherBin to find a slew of online retail coupons. Apps also allow users to scan product barcodes in-store, so they can view online reviews, promotions, and more.

Mobile Predictions

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Here’s a look at where mobile is headed over the next couple of years:

  • NFC terminals are expected to increase to 44.6 million.
  • 8.2 billion hand-held mobile devices will be active (2.7 GB of traffic per month).
  • 90% of mobile traffic will come from cloud applications (video/audio streaming, online gaming, social networking, web browsing, online storage).
  • Mobile commerce (m-commerce) sales will reach $626 billion.
  • Mobile video is expected to generate over 69% of mobile data traffic.

Mobile devices will play an integral role in the evolution of customer convenience for years to come. People now expect instant gratification, which is largely due to the latest mobile technologies. Keep these trends in mind as shopping behaviors and lifestyles in general continue to redefine expectations.

By Meaghan Moraes

Startups Soaring With The Cloud

Startups Soaring With The Cloud

Startup Cloud Boom

In 2015, the cloud was primarily used by large and mid-level organizations for mission-critical workloads, but this year it’s entrenching itself with startups and driving transformation. In India, currently boasting 2.75 million developers, and second only to the US’s 3.6 million developers, startups are reportedly adopting IBM Cloud to expand their businesses and develop applications with developer-friendly Bluemix and its catalog based on open standards, choice, and portability. Says Vivek Malhotra, director of IBM Cloud India/South Asia, “Based on open source, Bluemix helps startups get a single development and management experience across any combination of public, dedicated and local Bluemix instances. Even if clients have existing infrastructure setups or application program interface (API), they can securely connect those to Bluemix for a hybrid solution.”

Successful Startups & Bluemix

startup-movement

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Yipeedo, a mobile-only platform helping urban city dwellers get the most from their environs, uses Bluemix for its application development. The application analyzes user tastes and preferences and uses this data to recommend suitable activities. Wolken Software also utilized Bluemix when building their TeamToq app, an enterprise-class app enabling secure and collaborative device agnostic discussions between individuals, enterprise apps, and enterprise cloud apps. And KlickDoc, a comprehensive cloud-based healthcare platform connecting patients with doctors, diagnostic centers, and pharmacies makes use of IBM Bluemix as the development platform for their programming language, PHP runtime. Srinath Ranga, founder of Opteamize Cloud Solutions, a corporate connect marketplace built on Bluemix, asserts, “As a startup, we need app development platforms that are fast, secured, and easy to use. IBM has a deep understanding of the startup environment and is helping us create a market differentiation through its cloud-based solutions. Bluemix, with cutting edge features like deep analytics or cognitive capabilities, makes apps a lot more innovative and interesting for our audiences.

Alternative Platforms

Of course, Bluemix isn’t the only cloud platform providing support to startups, and along with some of the house brands like Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services, a variety of diverse platforms are available to back up emerging startups. Fusio is an open source API management platform that helps developers build and manage RESTful APIs, and provides endpoint versioning, schema definition, secure authorization, and the ability to handle data from different sources. And Apigee, another free tools platform for testing, debugging, protecting and analytics on API, is a highly scalable hybrid that helps developers build apps faster, predict next best action, and connects developers. Along with Cloud Foundry, Cloudify, and OpenShift, Apache CloudStack is notable, designed to deploy and manage large networks of virtual machines as a highly scalable and available Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud computing platform.

Whatever platform exploited, the cloud market is thriving. Says Malhotra, “Cloud is the wave of the future and given the inter-linkages with mobility, big data, and social, we foresee the migration of all enterprise data to public, private or hybrid cloud model within the next few years.”

By Jennifer Klostermann

Cloud Startups To Watch In 2016

Cloud Startups To Watch In 2016

Cloud Startups To Watch

China Equity Group spin-off Cocoon Networks’ has recently launched a new $715 million investment fund specifically for European startups, and with their track record in cloud computing and biotech investments, 2016 could be shaping up positively for cloud computing startups. The fund aims to invest in startups covering fintech, biotech, and more, “whose products and services show promise and potential for growth in the Chinese market.

Cocoon Networks is also introducing an incubator space in London. But China isn’t the only nation investing in cloud startups, and both entrepreneurs and consumers worldwide are looking for the next big thing.

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Venture Capitalists Weigh In

2015 ended on a record high for venture capital investments as, according to KPMG and CB Insights, total deals topped $100 billion. Internet companies, tech, mobile, and consumer startups dominated the marketplace. This year, venture capitalist Ted Leonsis, one of the founders and partners of Revolution Growth, expects the virtual reality market to boom with training products for sports, education and the military. Aspect Ventures’ co-founder Theresia Gouw points to the improved sophistication of cyber criminals as an enormous opportunity for legitimate businesses this year, and Shasta Ventures’ Sean Flynn agrees that cyber security is a “really big opportunity”, especially as more and more employees are using their own devices at work. Ravi Belani, managing partner at Alchemist Accelerator and lecturing in entrepreneurship at Stanford University, supports predictions of a surge in IoT developments, saying, “All objects will become intelligent. Every device has the capability now because the price point of chips and sensors and security is becoming so low. And that’s hugely exciting.

Interesting Cloud Startups of 2015

In 2015, a few cloud startups caught analysts’ attention, including Velostrata, Ravello Systems, and DigitalOcean. Velostrata has focused on the incorporation of cloud by traditional businesses, recently releasing technology that helps streamline the move of data into and out of the cloud.

Ravello Systems, a cloud startup in the software as a service (SaaS) market provides SaaS-based offerings that enable organizations to rapidly create VMware instances in a public cloud through the leveraging of nested virtualizations, and according to Colm Keegan, senior analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group, their solutions are particularly interesting for IT businesses needing to quickly deploy temporary sets of cloud-based application services. With a specific focus on developers, DigitalOcean operates in the infrastructure as a service (IaaS) arena, providing public cloud infrastructure at global scale, and Holger Mueller, principal analyst at Boston-based Constellation Research Inc., considers this organization one to follow in 2016.

More Startups to Watch in 2016

Another cloud startup to track is Nextbit with its cloud-based smartphone scheduled for release early this year. Nextbit’s smartphone’s claim to fame is unlimited cloud storage, with the idea that users’ data is always available, regardless of the device being used. Datadog, “crack for developers”, allows IT professionals and developers to monitor their apps and data across all of their cloud services at once. Says New Enterprise Associates’ Chetan Puttagunta, “It’s changing the way enterprises monitor their cloud infrastructure. The company has signed some of the biggest up-and-coming companies, such as Airbnb and Zendesk, as well as established enterprises like HP.” With further startups such as Highfive, EverString, Zoomdata, and PlanGrid using and fueling the cloud industry, 2016’s cloud landscape is off to a healthy start.

By Jennifer Klostermann

From Startup To Becoming Enterprise Grade

From Startup To Becoming Enterprise Grade

Becoming Enterprise Grade

How can an emerging business make a successful transition from selling to SMB customers that fueled their early growth to the enterprise customers that enable long-term profitability? What works with SMB customers often won’t get you a seat at the enterprise table. To make deep inroads into enterprise accounts, you have to adopt an enterprise-grade mindset in everything you do.

Want to Win Enterprise Customers? Adopt an Enterprise-Grade Culture

How can an emerging business make a successful shift from SMB markets to enterprise? That’s a question that didn’t come up very often back when I was managing worldwide channels, first for BEA, and then for Oracle after BEA was acquired. When you’re already embedded in the enterprise space, you don’t think much about the steps it took to get there.

But it’s a question smaller companies have to ask — and solve — if they want to gain entry into enterprise accounts, and retain them. The stakes are high. In the software arena alone, worldwide enterprise sales were tracking to have hit $338B (US) in 2015, according to Gartner. The question of how to win a share of that business became relevant to me personally three years ago when I became CEO and President of Aria Systems.

Adopting Early

Aria made its mark by pioneering a cloud-based billing platform that enables businesses of any size to maximize recurring revenue and grow customer lifetime value. We initially focused the business around targeting the SMB segment of the market; due largely to the early adoption for SaaS applications we centered on these buyers. Large enterprise companies were reticent to purchase cloud-based solutions, particularly mission critical applications from young “start-ups.”

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A few months after I became CEO we decided to make a very deliberate shift and focus Aria entirely on the enterprise market. My team and I concluded this was the right market to build all aspects of our company around; hiring DNA, product roadmap, infrastructure, security/compliance, marketing, support – the entire factory floor. A few conclusions that drove this decision: the quality of the revenue is much higher in this segment; the unit economics are much more compelling; and our assertion that the enterprise adoption would dramatically accelerate. More importantly from the get go, our product is architected with this enterprise use case in mind, so it was a natural to apply it to the need from which it was born.

The challenge was that we were a small company selling a mission critical technology to global enterprises, and there was no proven playbook on how to execute on this shift. So, we developed our own. In the past three years, we’ve completely transformed our business, and have successfully crossed the chasm. Today, global enterprise customers comprise 90% of our business, up from just 10% before we made the transition.

How did we pull it off? Shortly after we embarked, we realized that in order to earn our place at the table (and keep it) with larger companies, we had to become more like them in the way we operated as a company. We had to ingrain an enterprise-grade mindset into what we sold, how we sold it, and how we supported our customers for long-term success.

Here are 5 takeaways from our experience:

  • Ensure your offering really is enterprise worthy. You can’t just slap an “enterprise-grade” label on your website or power point slide with no substance behind it to back it up. Too many SaaS companies make that mistake. They pay dearly for it when they set certain expectations with their customers and come up far short. Enterprises are typically highly risk averse. They have to know your solution and your company is trustworthy — given many of the buyers are betting their careers on these critical decisions.

We invested a great deal of time and effort in fusing our cloud platform with the stringent levels of security, reliability and scalability enterprises require, aspects that we take pains to improve on an ongoing basis. But having an enterprise-grade product gets you only so far. In fact, it’s just the starting point.

  • Go all in. To make a successful push into large organizations requires a pervasive focus on serving the unique needs of enterprise customers. We recalibrated our business across the board. We started placing less emphasis on quick short-term hits. Instead, from the onset of the sales process — to the support network for long-term customers — our goal became one of customer cultivation, satisfaction and retention.
  • Take the long view. Many companies who start out pursuing SMBs usually target one type of user or a single department, and very often for short-term contracts. Generally speaking, their problems are relatively narrow in scope. Your product solves their immediate tactical needs and you move on to the next customer.

We discovered that this “won-and-done” approach doesn’t cut it with enterprise customers. Their challenges tend to be far more complex and ever changing to keep up with the dynamics of their own businesses. As a result, enterprise IT seeks solutions that can handle complexity and last for years, not just single product cycles, or target markets. Successful enterprise solutions are architected to ensure the flexibility needed to adapt to the continuous evolution of products and market trends.

  • Make the relationship your top priority. Correspondingly, to succeed with enterprise customers, you need to nurture relationships that will last years. Enterprises expect you to be as committed and steadfast as the partners they rely on. Large companies often grow and change in unpredictable ways over time. They need to know their solutions will keep pace and be supported no matter what and for however long it takes.

For us, it meant taking a longer-term approach to how we built our business relationships. As it takes certain skill sets to manage customer relationships, we began filling our ranks with talented individuals predisposed to taking the long view. We have staffed across the board with people willing to do whatever it takes to become trusted advisors for our enterprise clients. When a customer contract is signed it is often the drop-off point for the relationship, but this is exactly when it really needs to begin in earnest.

  • Embrace a collaborative approach. Enterprise infrastructure is often marked by an unruly mix of new and legacy systems, stemming from rapid growth, distributed locations, M&A activity and many other factors. Many emerging companies don’t have to contend with all or even most of these challenges. But you have to accommodate them.

We do that by fostering a spirit of collaboration with our enterprise customers. We don’t add to their infrastructure burden; we lessen it. Rather than co-opt existing ways of doing things, we peacefully co-exist with global software suppliers and implementation partners. We introduce pilot projects when it makes sense. We complement legacy systems wherever possible when the customer so chooses. To some enterprise customers change is not welcome, to others it’s encouraged. You need to have a playbook for both types of enterprise cultures; both continuity and innovative disruption.

The notion of adopting an enterprise-grade culture to steadily increase our global business now seems obvious to us. But it wasn’t when we started out. Our journey was long and hard. The lessons learned along the way surprised us more than we expected. But it’s a transformation I’m proud to have been a part of. And it’s one I highly recommend for any company that wants to excel with enterprise customers over the long haul.

By Tom Dibble

Fade To Black – SaaS Streaming Site Netflix Fights Proxy Users

Fade To Black – SaaS Streaming Site Netflix Fights Proxy Users

Netflix Fights Proxy Users

Video-streaming service provider Netflix Inc said subscribers will, in a few weeks, no longer be able to use proxies to watch content not available in their home country.

Subscribers often resort to proxies, or servers that facilitate access to content that is not locally available, to access Netflix’s popular shows such as “House of cards” and “Orange is the new black“.

“If all of our content were globally available, there wouldn’t be a reason for members to use proxies or unblockers,” Netflix vice president of content delivery architecture, David Fullagar, wrote in a blog.

The announcement comes just a week after Netflix went live in more than 130 countries, covering almost the entire globe except China.

Netflix said at the time that all of its shows would not be available immediately to subscribers in certain countries, but that it was working towards resolving that.

Article Source: Reuters 

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Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data The modern enterprise is digital. It relies on accurate and timely data to support the information and process needs of its workforce and its customers. However, data suffers from a likability crisis. It’s as essential to us as oxygen, but because we don’t see it, we take it for granted.…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…