Category Archives: SaaS

Utilizing Software Defined Networking (SDN)

Utilizing Software Defined Networking (SDN)

Software Defined Networking

Winding down this year, we only have a couple of topics left: SDNs and SDI. Although SDNs are part of a solid SDI, we want to talk directly about it now.

Many cloud management tools have the ability to create a virtual network. But creating a true VXLAN would require support of the layer 2 to UDP protocol encapsulation. But that raises another question: Is a VXLAN a true SDN?

First, what is a SDN? SDN stands for Software Defined Networking. This means than a very robust network can be created and ran through a software system. That being said, exactly how robust it is, is determined by the package that is either included in your cloud management software, or a third party software that you add to your environment.

Load Balancing, Firewalls and Advanced Routing

So, now that we know what it is, how do we use it? Lets try this example first. You have a basic cloud setup; several tenants (or projects based on your cloud management software (CMS)) are setup. You are using basic network connectivity through your CMS to talk to the physical VLAN that connects your COMPUTE nodes of your cloud.

Load-balancer-info-graphic

(Image Source: Leaseweb)

You can communicate with other systems across your physical network. But now, you would like to add some additional services, such as load balancing (LB), firewalls (FW), and advanced routing (RTR).

Not all SDNs have all of these capabilities, but most that I have worked with do. So here you are, and you want to expand the network first. You would like to have several subnets, with each tenant having its’ own network range of IPs. Firing up your management software, you create a virtual router first. This router makes the connection from the CMS and the SDN to the physical layer of the network. This is at Layer 2 and possibly Layer 3 of the OSI model.

This virtual RTR is now your gateway for all your networks. You can make additional RTRs if you have separate connections to networks below the CMS software. Actually you can have separate RTRs for every network you have, even 20 to 50 of them, but management becomes a nightmare.

Tweaking The Traffic

You now have at least one network, and you have a RTR attached to it making the connection to the physical VLAN below the CMS. What if you want a LB or a FW on your network? Well, some CMS programs come with the ability to have Security Groups, or filters on your traffic. In the most logical and simple sense, you are using a firewall. It can restrict traffic based on TCP/UDP port, Protocol number (e.g. GRE tunneling uses Protocol number 47, not port 47), sender and receiver and so forth. Truly a firewall in all sense of the word.

tweaking-traffic-firewall

But if you want to share policies and centralized management of your FW, you will need to engage an SDN. (In some cases, you can load a major virtual FW, and have it manage all policies).

But what about LBs? That is another great thing of the SDN toolset. Most have the ability to build pools and do SSL off-loading right from within the software. Many LBs and FWs expose an API stack for you to take advantage of, especially if you are functioning in a DevOps or a CI/CD (Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery) model.

It is difficult to be vendor agnostic with all the different SDNs available out there. But go slow, do your homework, and you will succeed in nailing it.

By Richard Thayer

The Rise of The As-a-Service Industry

The Rise of The As-a-Service Industry

No Longer Doing It by the Book: The Rise of the As-a-Service Industry

In mid-2015, a world leader in online book sales announced a ground-breaking approach to royalty payments to authors whose books were listed on their e-book lending service. In essence, the company announced that they would be paid by each page that had been read, rather than simply a flat fee for the download of the book. This innovation was met with much despair by writers and the media, who immediately saw it as a new form of either censorship or exploitation, given that readers need no longer complete their emotional and financial investment in a book, but simply pay a pro-rated fee for whatever progress they made. One journalist suggested, tongue-in-cheek, that perhaps the same principle be offered in restaurants, in which patrons would have to pay only for the portion of a meal that they consumed.

writers-frusterated

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

It must be emphasized that this pay-per-page development applied only to the extensive subscription-based lending library, and not to books that were purchased and downloaded the traditional way. However, it is indicative of a trend in almost all industries, in which products are giving way to an “as-a-service” economy. The fact that this transformation is now happening to a centuries-old industry (book publishing) proves that no one is safe from change, and it delivers some significant strategic lessons for companies everywhere.

The book publishing industry represents one powerful middle layer between creator and consumer. As with the movie and music industries, publishers have essentially dictated how creative material is to be distributed—and how its creators are to be paid. Ironically, although this pay-per-page initiative seems, at first glance, to penalize authors, many of those who analyse their potential revenue based on the formula envision little to no loss, and perhaps even a financial gain—a step forward from the meagre royalty structure that most authors currently face.

Overnight Pop-up Trends

As such, traditional publishers stand as a symbol for distributors of all other types of goods. It is important to recognize that in this changing economy, new things are happening: long-term patterns and predictions are giving way to overnight pop-up trends; manufacturers are discovering they are free to sell direct to consumer (D2C), cutting out the middleman completely; consumers are becoming increasingly aware of their power through comparison-shopping, online research and reviews – they have greater sway over the marketplace than ever before. So, in the same way that books are now at the whim of a reader’s attention, so too are products of all types, and those who sell them—all along the chain—must pay attention. The term “disruptive” is often used to describe innovative products and technologies that have caught on to this new movement, because that is what they are doing: disrupting the status quo.

publishing-popup-trends

Secondly, the pay-per-page approach redefines book publishing as “reading-as-a-service,” and thus brings it in line with many other types of as-a-service offerings that manufacturers and distributors are either discovering or are being forced to embrace. Whereas once it was sufficient to sell a photocopier to an office or copy shop, the better model is proving to be one in which the device remains the property of the manufacturer, and a service is sold to the retailer in the form of number of pages printed, toner refills, maintenance, training and up-sell opportunities. In short, service is replacing products across the board.

Balancing Quality With Agility

Some authors have cynically suggested that their writing style might now actually have to adapt to readers’ tastes rather than the other way around. But this is the same situation that all companies face: the need to balance quality with agility, both inside and out. It applies to products for sale, and it applies equally to hiring and retaining quality talent.

Paying for “pages read” may seem like an odd and non-traditional idea. But so too is the idea of dominating the hotel industry without owning property as AirBnB did, or changing the taxi industry without buying cars, as Uber did. In fact, “odd and non-traditional” are quickly becoming bastions of the new normal. Writers and readers are welcome to push back against the pay-per-page initiative with outrage, but they should also see this new form of publishing as the writing on the wall.

For more on this topic, go to businessvalueexchange.com, sponsored by HP Enterprise Services.

By Steve Prentice

Cloud Pinup: PageCloud – Writing A New Chapter In Webdesign

Cloud Pinup: PageCloud – Writing A New Chapter In Webdesign

Cloud Pinup: PageCloud

One of the most neglected areas of web development in recent years has been around the actual process of building and designing a brand new website. There have been strides in template-driven web design but too often they are limiting, technical and downright clunky to use. But a Canadian startup called PageCloud is set to launch on December 1st with a product that, at first glance, seems too good to be true. Intuitive, user-friendly, flexible and high-end all at the same time. A new way to create a new web.

Here is PageCloud’s motivation for building this remarkable tool: ‘’The internet was always intended to be a place where anyone in the world can create and share something online. Somewhere along the way, we lost that. It became a read-only experience for the average user, who is left to passively browse and navigate the web. PageCloud treats any web browser as a creative tool, so that anyone seeking to build something online can do so, with ease, confidence, and delight.”

Taking On WordPress

217px-Tobias_Lütke,_ShopifyThe SaaS firm out of Ottawa, Canada has received a tremendous amount of buzz following a breakout performance at TechCrunch Disrupt and has amassed over $6 million in seed funding, most notably from Shopify CEO Tobi Lutke and early stage investment firms Accomplice and Singularity Investments. The hype seems to be justified as the company took over $200 000 in pre-sales during August and has doubled its staff complement to cope with the massive worldwide interest.

Much of the confidence in the company comes from PageCloud CEO Craig Fitzpatrick, a man not afraid to make bold statements like, “We’re going to replace WordPress.” In his bio on the site Fitzpatrick explains his motivation for PageCloud: “I want to create a world where everyone has equal access to be creative, and to share with the rest of the planet. I view it as a basic digital human right to create and share from equal footing – and I believe so much more good will come from that experience.”

And what is the edge that PageCloud has over its competitors? Simply that it makes web design easy for anyone to do. You can drag and drop like never before, import straight from Photoshop into your new site, and even find a site that you like, copy all the elements and then remake it in your own style. The browser is a blank canvas and all you have to exercise is your imagination to make it come to life. In its very impressive startup video from TechCrunch Disrupt, the customization for mobile devices seems effortless as well. Take a look:

PageCLoud is a SaaS platform, accessible via any modern browser. All sites built with PageCloud will be built upon Amazon’s cloud infrastructure, AWS. It’s compatible with most e-commerce providers, offers ‘headless’ CMS and the JavaScript API is totally transparent in edit mode. For answers to any other questions, check out their FAQ’s.

Will the company be able to deliver on all its promises? Only time will tell. But with projections of takeup from customers running 12 months ahead of schedule, it seems that the market is betting on PageCloud getting it right and changing the web design game. Speaking to The Globe and Mail, Fitzgerald admitted that “Pagecloud isn’t necessarily for the ‘1 per cent of people’ who build websites full-time using WordPress or customers who need the services of a web designer to build out their brands, but all the rest”.

By Jeremy Daniel

All Enterprises Should Model Themselves After Today’s Startups

All Enterprises Should Model Themselves After Today’s Startups

Startups Leveraging Cloud Services

Never in history has it been easier to start a business and fast track growth to dominate a market. Conversely, it has never been possible to transform from market leader to market memory faster than now. New startups are disrupting the market, fast tracking growth and sucker punching the market leaders. How are they breaking down the barriers of entry and overachieving in today’s fierce marketplace?

During their initial phase, startups want to conserve capital and lower their burn rate to achieve faster profitability, they need to grow and scale fast and efficiently and they need access to talent. A Deloitte survey shows that 83% of startups leverage cloud services to gain access to technologies and skills they otherwise could not afford. The companies leveraging cloud tools grew 26% faster than those that did not while delivering 21% higher gross profit.

Building A Blueprint

infographic-startup

(Infographic Source: Pinterest)

Cloud services enable startups the ability to implement advanced technologies and practices earlier in development cycle providing them benefits typically only experienced by older and more mature companies. Startups embracing cloud technology outperform those that are slow adopters. In fact, the fastest growing 30% of companies spend more than 10% of revenue on IT while their slower growing counterparts spend 4%-5%.

No longer is a 50-page business plan and credit history required to get a loan. Crowdsourcing and micro financing allows savvy start-ups easy access to funding while social media platforms and search engine optimization techniques enable cost effective outreach directly to customers and target markets. Expensive print ad and broadcast marketing campaigns are tools of the past replaced by Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

Startups, driven by their need for fast growth and scalability, have outgrown the legacy thinking of building their own IT computing platform. Leveraging cloud services for compute and storage, startups can quickly scale up or down in a cost effective manner while preserving precious capital. This limitless, on demand capacity enables speed to execution for these startups which allows them to outpace their larger competitors that do not leverage similar cloud services.

Large SaaS Investment Interest

startups-saas

(Infographic Source:Bloomberg)

Startups have capitalized on the scurry of software vendors delivering their enterprise applications via a Software as a Service (SaaS) model. As referred to earlier, this has enabled these newbie enterprises access to applications they could have never afforded in the past. Complex ERP, SAP or CRM application which were not only costly to buy required a complex and expensive computing platform of servers and storage, as well as, highly skilled IT professionals to configure and maintain. The SaaS delivery model allows these small companies to pay a monthly fee and the software is delivered via a browser to the users. No setup, no purchasing of expensive infrastructure and no high paid IT staff required. A perfect formula for the cash conscious startup.

Beating The Competition

chess-comp

When outsourcing non-core business functions to the cloud the startup’s IT staff is freed up to focus on strategic initiatives which add value to the business rather than being sidetracked by routine activity which merely “keep the lights on”. Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers sell compute, storage and backup services in a scalable on demand fashion. Often, these providers layer managed service on top of their hardware platform to provide additional value. By taking advantage of these services, 75% of startups feel the cloud enabled them to focus on strategic projects. This is one way in which cloud services enables two-thirds of startups to beat their competitors.

Cloud technology provides startups with a platform to quickly develop and test new ideas for viability. The outcome is the ability to quickly move on successful ideas while failing faster on bad ideas. The ability to fail fast enables the conservation of resources and energy two precious commodities of a startup.

Finally, being lucky enough to make it this far, a start-up will reach a phase of maturity. At this stage, the leaders consolidate their gains and look to optimize the company. The operating infrastructure and payroll are scrutinized for efficiency. This is the moment where internal systems are evaluated based on merit of moving to the cloud. Management creatively evaluates how cloud services can improve front and back office operations and thereby prevent stagnation. This exercise also enables the company to identify new methods available to startups which could disrupt their market and diminish their competitive advantage.

When optimizations are complete and the company is throwing cash to the bottom line the mature enterprise must now look for ways to innovate. Innovation is required to open new markets, products or services to increase the revenue stream. One method companies often employ to focus on innovation is to setup a fast-moving spinoff to explore a new business model, product or service and thus the process starts over again. WASH RINSE REPEAT

Now we know existing businesses cannot fiscally afford to overhaul their entire business and once to mimic the actions of a startup. The goal here is to open the mind and challenge the legacy thinking of how to build IT operations. The cloud has changed the way in which we do business and those unwilling to investigate and leverage cloud service where applicable will have a tough time competing with those that do. What builds a great startup builds a great company and there are lessons to be learned by us all.

By Marc Malizia

Salesforce Gets Serious About Its Security Ecosystem

Salesforce Gets Serious About Its Security Ecosystem

Salesforce Gets Serious About Its Security Ecosystem With New Event Monitoring API

Salesforce is one of the fastest growing enterprise software companies in history and while security is a major roadblock for many cloud projects, the company’s extensive security investments appear to be paying off. Salesforce is one of just 9.4% of cloud providers that store data encrypted and they support a wide range of security controls including IP address whitelisting, device pinning, and multi-factor authentication. If there’s a concern about data going to Salesforce’s cloud, it’s a concern about how users treat that data, not the integrity of the platform.

password

Under a shared responsibility model, Salesforce takes care of platform security, while customers are responsible for taking precautions to ensure their users don’t expose that data to risk. That means the end customer is responsible for ensuring their salespeople don’t download all the company’s sales contacts before quitting to join a competitor, or that users have appropriate application permissions that don’t give them access to data they shouldn’t be able to access based on their role at the company.

One of the primary concerns of companies with large Salesforce deployments is a rogue employee taking sales contacts when leaving the company for a competitor. One study found that half of employees took data with them when they left their job and 40% planned to use that data at their next job. Key indicators that something is amiss can include an employee downloading an unusual amount of data. Let’s say this employee typically views 50-100 opportunities each day, and then downloads a report with 1,500 opportunities. That could indicate there’s a problem.

Another threat faced today is the possibility that a user or administrator will sell sensitive data. A shocking survey recently found that 25% of employees would sell company data for less than $8,000. Many companies store a vast amount of sensitive data in Salesforce including customer credit card numbers, Social Security numbers, patient information, and other sensitive or regulated data. Even if a rogue employee is at fault, a company can still be fined and sued if this data is stolen.

Such “insider threats” are increasingly common. Skyhigh recently analyzed data across its customers and found that companies, on average, experience 9.3 insider threat incidents each month. Not all of these events are malicious, they also include users mistakenly sharing data when they shouldn’t. All told, 89.6% of companies experience at least one insider threat each month on average. Salesforce recognizes these concerns and is making investments to support the development of security solutions that help address these concerns.

To help support customers in identifying these types of negligent or malicious activities, Salesforce has made available new event monitoring APIs that provide a record of user and administrator activity within Salesforce. The volume of these events is enormous. In the most recent quarter, Salesforce’s core platform processed 234 billion transactions, including logins, edits, and downloads. That’s an average of 3.7 billion events each business day – quite the haystack to search for a few needles.

API Connect

For customers looking for unusual user or account activity, the sheer number of events in Salesforce would be impossible to manually review. In making these new APIs available, Salesforce is making a significant investment to support its security ecosystem to build solutions that help Salesforce customers understand and manage user activity. Also, these APIs provide a near real-time feed of events that can be captured by security solutions and archived, rather than forcing customers to go to their Salesforce account manager and request logs for a post-incident investigation.

Salesforce is already one of the most secure cloud services available. Owing to its investment in platform security, Salesforce is one of the 8.1% of cloud services that meet the security standards of enterprises today. With the introduction of new APIs to support third party security solutions that give greater visibility into usage and the ability to detect threats, the company is well positioned to continue its leadership position in the cloud market.

By Harold Byun

Alphabet’s Google Points To Mobile-Desktop Convergence

Alphabet’s Google Points To Mobile-Desktop Convergence

Mobile-Desktop Convergence

The announcement by Alphabet Inc.GOOGL -0.13%‘s Google that it plans to fold its Chrome PC operating system into Android is the latest sign of the growing dominance of mobile computing, the WSJ’s Alistair Barr writes. But for CIOs the news marks a step towards the day when they won’t have to develop or manage so many different versions of applications for desktops, tablets and phones.

The company plans to unveil its new, single operating system in 2017 and, to be sure, the decision should not come as a surprise. Google co-founder Sergey Brin hinted at such a convergence way back in 2009. What is a surprise, perhaps, is that it was Android’s app-based approach that won out over Chrome, a niche player, but one boasting a Web and browser-centric experience closer to Google’s original mission…

Read Full Article: WSJ

How The Cloud Is Turning Retail Health Providers Into Power Players

How The Cloud Is Turning Retail Health Providers Into Power Players

Telemedicine and Healthcare Cloud Trends

“With the role of retail clinics expanding, the healthcare industry is entering into a dynamic period of change” – Rand Corporation

Retail health is changing the face of healthcare delivery by moving care outside the four walls of the hospital and offering care in drug store chains, grocery stores, and superstores. Retail health clinics are staffed by nurse practitioners who provide treatment for minor illnesses, preventative care and vaccinations.

Retail health is on the upswing — more and more people are choosing retail healthcare before seeking medical treatment in physician offices and hospitals. Global management consulting firm, Accenture, predicted that the number of walk-in retail clinics in the United States would almost double in 2015, to nearly 3,000.

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Wearable Infection

So What’s All the Fuss about Retail Health?

Affordable: According to Advisory Health, retail clinics cost 30% to 40% less than at a physician’s office because clinics typically employ mid-level providers, such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants.

Predictable, Transparent Pricing: Many retailers offer fixed, predictable prices. They also post their prices online (including Walgreens and CVS) adding a level of transparency not available in traditional hospitals.

Convenient: Retail health makes healthcare accessible and convenient. They typically stay open later than a doctor’s office and on weekends. At a “one stop shop”, patients can visit a health care provider and immediately pick up a prescription at the same place.

What’s in Store for Retail Health?

The trend in retail healthcare started with medical clinics in pharmacies and continues to evolve with health kiosks, walk-in clinics, telemedicine services, and more. Let’s explore some of the major trends in retail health. (Click to view/zoom the archived Infographic discovered at http://www.envisioning.io)

Telemedicine heath cloud

Trend #1: Telemedicine

Telemedicine combines technology with health care, allowing remote communication between physicians and patients.

As technology advances, medical care follows suit. Telemedicine utilizes technology to permit better communication between the patient and healthcare professional from a distance. The trend has become popular with several of the nation’s largest pharmacy chain companies. CVS’s in-store program manages calls from patients, caregivers, nurses, doctors or pharmacists providing information on specific diseases, related therapies, and adverse reactions.

Trend #2: The Health Cloud

The Salesforce Health Cloud allows physicians to coordinate better with their patients.

Salesforce made headways in telemedicine by launching its Salesforce Health Cloud, a solution that empowers caregivers to connect with patients via mobile, social, and other channels. The platform includes a complete view of electronic medical records (EMRs) and enables better communication between patients and their caregivers. When combined with online guidance platforms such as Walkme, the Salesforce Health Cloud makes it easier than ever for patients to get in touch with a doctor right away.

For more information on the drivers behind the adoption of the cloud, click here.

Trend #3: Walk-In Clinics

Walk-in clinics provide faster, more convenient options to get basic medical care.

Retailers like Target, Rite Aid, and Walmart started to build walk-in clinics and hire health care providers to provide basic medical services in their stores. For example, Novant Health partnered with Target to open walk-in clinics inside Target locations staffed by Target nurse practitioners and overseen by Novant doctors. The clinics aim to provide affordable telemedicine, mobile coaching apps, and other prescription and health care options.

Even supermarkets have joined the mix. Food stores find themselves in a unique position to combine health care with overall wellness. The parent company of Stop & Shop deployed nutritionists to stores and trained pharmacists to help patients take medications correctly and eat healthier diets. Whole Foods also announced their plans to provide health retreats along with walk-in medical clinics.

Trend #4: Telemedicine Goes Mobile

Retail clinics partner with telemedicine vendors to provider mobile healthcare applications.

The advent of smartphones has ushered in a new chapter in health. In 2014, Walgreens teamed up with telemedicine vendor, MDLIVE to provide virtual doctor visits through a mobile application. Unlike competitors Rite Aid, CVS, and Walmart, which currently provide in-store telemedicine services, Walgreens offers this service via a downloadable app allowing patients to consult virtually with physicians and mental health specialists anytime and anywhere from a computer or mobile device—not just from within a Walgreens pharmacy.

The new age in retail health promises a more accessible and cost-effective approach to medicine. With more communication between doctors and their patients and better access to information, we should be seeing improved patient care and outcomes.

By Boaz Amidor

Integrating Supply Chain Solutions On The Cloud

Integrating Supply Chain Solutions On The Cloud

Integrating Supply Chain Solutions

When oversimplified, Sales & Operation Planning (S&OP) is the iterative process behind optimizing Sales, Marketing, Product Management, Finance, Operations & Post Sales. It provides Executives from cross-functional organizations, a framework to collaborate and maximize utilization of its’ resource and ultimately optimize productivity across its’ entire value chain.

supply chain

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Why should this be of interest to you?

In a complex multi-matrix Enterprise environment, your goal may be to accurately measure current and future Demand variables across each node of your value chain, hopefully maintaining accuracy and consistency.

Or in an isolated functional organization, you find yourself responsible for improving any one of the following (or so you are told):

  • Demand Generation
  • Improve Sales
  • Increase Revenue
  • Reduce Cost (of Business Operations)
  • Optimize Throughput (Plants, Production line, Time-to-market etc…) and the likes

I am assuming (and sincerely hope) you already leverage technology to optimize your specific business area or areas. If not, this blog can serve during your technology selection process.

Let’s step back…so we can move forward.

The Road so far for S&OP Technologies:

Since its conception in the 1980’s, by Richard Ling, S&OP Solutions has evolved to a significantly mature state. We also may know them of SCM Systems. SCM’s core strength is in its ability to tailor ad-hoc processes so to meet desired results; while accommodating varied levels of organization maturity. This allowed it to evolve continuously and iteratively (we call it agile now). However, when compared to other technology solutions, it’s evolution over last 25 years, appears dwarfed. Why?

Our flaws are often the mirror image of our strengths. And so it has been for SCM Solutions.

supply-chain-collaboration

(Image Source:elogics.co.za)

Through its evolution into Supply Chain Collaboration (SCC), S&OP has remained focused in hyper-optimizing specific functional areas with bare minimal process automation, limiting itself to critical business information. Although this selective bias allowed us an ability to measure only some of the core KPI’s (revenue, performance etc.), it made it impossible or cost prohibitive to measure the intangibles – Constraints, Channel Behaviors, and Cross-functional efficiencies.

Only a handful few, likely 20% of the Fortune 100, may have the capital to muscle up and create this custom visibility across isolated applications. The rest of us will have to looked into the future…

We can better understand this as we find S&OP’s drive to morph itself into Integrated Business Planning (IBP) through early-late 2000s. IBP (often touted as the Big brother of S&OP) is a term coined by OliverWight group and widely adopted by leading Solution Providers.

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” — Aristotle. And that’s how S&OP technologies will continue to evolve.

The differentiating factors:

1. Existing investments in isolation (ERP, CRM, APM etc.) CANNOT be scaled up efficiently to meet IBP needs. Need for an Integrated Ecosystem has driven this surge in API driven frameworks across all products.

2. Best-In-Class S&OP applications are already available, but they appear optimal in a silo and too difficult (or expensive) to be tightly integrated.

3. Internal Maturity alone will not determine success. Improve Maturity of your Partners, Suppliers, 3PLs etc. ecosystem as well.

4. Further, optimize the Speed & Cost of Doing Business? Choose products which allow: Rapid Deployment, Mobile-Enabled Enterprise, Omni-Channel Management, Private/Hybrid Cloud etc.

5. Real-time Demand Planning: Extend your core Application modules to mobile endpoints.

6. Data & Everything in between: With access to disposable (read relatively inexpensive) Cloud Storage, we can now track all Business-behavioral data. Mine them based on your own algorithms (iterative evolution) to pro-actively determine meaningful changes – like channel behaviors,

7. Leverage IOT: IOT will significantly improve Visibility of Goods across the Fulfillment, Transportation phases. Industrial IOT (IIOT) will disrupt and revolutionize the service levels which 3PLs are able to provide today (…a future article)

Our Future:

With the stabilization of Best-in-Class frameworks across isolated Applications (thanks to SaaS), we find a spike in the overall maturity curve for applications within a functional area. But these isolated SaaS Applications may provide the maximum intrinsic value because of the issues we discussed above.

It is not a surprise that SCM Applications demonstrated a 10.8 percent annual growth accumulating a $9.9B in 2014. While the SCM Cloud demonstrated an above-market growth of 17 percent.

Companies who are positioned with a Technology Stack, instead of isolated applications, can provide exponential value. Primarily from leveraging its eco-system and in tightly coupled process integrations, pre-baked into the environment. Hence, the top 3 market leaders – SAP, Oracle & JDA Software, controls a whopping 44.8% market share in 2014.

By Sourin Paul

CloudTweaks Comics
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Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Cloud Beacons Flying High When Apple debuted cloud beacons in 2013, analysts predicted 250 million devices capable of serving as iBeacons would be found in the wild within weeks. A few months later, estimates put the figure at just 64,000, with 15 percent confined to Apple stores. Beacons didn’t proliferate as expected, but a few…

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

The Digital Twin  How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future. In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global…

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Paying Attention To Data Security Your biggest data security threat could be sitting next to you… Data security is a big concern for businesses. The repercussions of a data security breach ranges from embarrassment, to costly lawsuits and clean-up jobs – particularly when confidential client information is involved. But although more and more businesses are…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…