Category Archives: SaaS

Moving HIPAA Compliant Healthcare Data Into The Cloud

Moving HIPAA Compliant Healthcare Data Into The Cloud

Moving HIPAA Compliant Healthcare Data

Complete HealthCare Solutions (CHS) is a large multidimensional healthcare computing firm headquartered in Palmer, Mass., and which serves 350 physicians, 12 hospitals, various group practices and individual patients throughout the United States. By 2009, their computing infrastructure had become a constraint on growth. Their existing network included many old, near end-of-life computers and proprietary systems that had been installed years ago, and scaling this computing capacity to meet demand was a constant challenge. Due to HIPAA regulations, CHS required a dedicated, secure, non shared computing environment, which made it impossible for them to collaborate with most traditional hosting solutions providers.

(Image source: Shutterstock)

(HIPAA refers to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which in essence establishes national standards for electronic health care transactions, protects the privacy of individuals’ health care information and encourages greater use of electronic data within the healthcare system.)

The CHS legacy systems, along with ongoing company growth meant that even maintaining the status quo was difficult, but CHS also further taxed their computing infrastructure by introducing new products and capabilities to benefit their clients. For instance, they wanted to provide physicians with the ability to access patient records securely from anywhere in the world, 24/7. This kind of capability is excellent for the end user, but it is expensive to develop and manage in-house. CHS therefore decided to explore the possibilities of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS).

After researching a number of potential providers, CHS teamed up with Florida-based Atlantic.Net, who designed a customized hybrid solution that combined Private Cloud and virtualization. Atlantic.Net confirmed that if CHS were to stay with an in-house HIPAA-compliant solution, it would have cost about $280,000 up-front, consisting of $80,000 for licensing and VPN, and $200,000 upfront capital expense for equipment.

In addition, an in-house system would have meant considerable ongoing expenses, including: colocation space for at least 2 racks in a data center (at least $6,000 per month, including power, space and bandwidth), staff costs for a new expert administrator to run the system, and continuation of existing management and consulting costs.

The approach that Atlantic.Net took involved installing and deploying customized hardware, specifically 15 high-end Intel Processor NE helm XEON servers. After installing the necessary software packages, they set up the network and secure redundant firewall system, while preserving and incorporating the necessary proprietary systems into the new IaaS package.

As a result of this work, 150 physicians were migrated seamlessly to the new system within weeks, while reducing deployment costs, ensuring compatibility, and establishing wide area networking to connect remote offices and the corporate office to the CHS core virtualized IT infrastructure at the Atlantic.Net data center. The fifteen new servers that were deployed not only avoided incurring any upfront capital expense, but also eliminated continuing in-house maintenance costs. In addition, by moving to a Xen-open source solution, Atlantic.Net saved its client $500 per month that had previously been spent on VMWARE vsphere hypervisors.

Joseph Nompleggi, VP of Product Development of Complete Healthcare Solutions put it this way: “Combining our medical software expertise with Atlantic.Net’s SAS 70 compliant data center facility, we are positioned well to become the medical software solution of choice for health care providers for all of their EMR/EHR data needs. Healthcare providers can now focus on their core business and leverage our expertise and software solutions to comply with the HIPAA and HITECH compliance requirements. Atlantic.Net’s reputation for 100% uptime, their secure infrastructure and expertise in Healthcare IT were key components in finalizing our partnership. Our partner’s financial strength and proven track record are something we view with great confidence.”

This is a classic case study,” says Adnan Raja, Marketing Director at Atlantic.Net, “of how organizations that don’t necessarily exist within the traditional business sphere – in this case dealing with private citizens’ health-related data – can take advantage of cloud technology and specifically IaaS, to better serve their client base in a cost-effective and secure way.”

Further details regarding the services Atlantic.Net delivers as a global hosting provider can be found at

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By Steve Prentice

Pinup: Sumo Logic Transforms Raw Data Logs

Pinup: Sumo Logic Transforms Raw Data Logs

Sumo Logic Transforms Raw Data Logs Into Wellsprings of Insight and Intelligence


Corporations today are generating data at an incredible rate. In fact, data generation has increased to the point where the average business collects the same amount of data in about 10 minutes as one would have throughout the whole year, just 10 years ago. With this increased influx of data comes the need for successful evaluation of the insights and intelligence that can be harvested from it. Enter Sumo Logic!

Originally launched in April of 2010 by Kumar Saurabh and Christian Beedgen, Sumo Logic provides the resources to leverage big data into a mountain of information vital to the growth and effectiveness of a company. Sumo Logic has received multiple rounds of funding from several investors, including Accel Partners and Sutter Hill Ventures.  Sumo Logic’s services revolve around a few major areas. These include:

Machine Data Analytics

One of the primary issues when it comes to the analysis of machine data is that many times operators are unsure what specifically to ask. Machine-data analysis can be separated into two areas: the questions you know to ask, and those you do not. Sumo Logic’s efficacy comes from combining both human interaction, such as search queries, with machine learning, to present a platform well able to handle these two areas.

Anomaly Detection

Sumo Logic’s Anomaly Detection service analyzes big data and detects and documents any anomalies it comes across. These are presented in an easy-to-read format and are categorized as events for simple research and reference.


With the increase in data generation comes the inevitable need to keep it in a clear and concise format that can easily be referenced for information and anomalies. LogReduce is a patent-pending service that can boil down thousands of pages of data into one central page of meaningful information.

Security DNA

Data security is always a concern when dealing with outside companies for assistance in management and intelligence gathering. Sumo Logic not only takes security seriously, they actually incorporate it into every aspect of their product platform.sumo-logic

This includes separating each customer’s data and securing it using customer-specific rotating keys. In addition, only employees specifically earmarked with a need to access production clusters are allowed to do so. Employees must provide multiple authentications and successfully pass security certifications and examinations.

Big data continues to grow at a geometric rate with each passing year, making the gleaning of insights and intelligence from it much more difficult. Sumo Logic recognizes these obstacles and is poised to deliver effective solutions at an affordable price.

By Joe Pellicone

Cloud-Based VOIP – 4 Alternatives To Skype

Cloud-Based VOIP – 4 Alternatives To Skype

Cloud-Based VOIP – 4 Alternatives To Skype

Skype is the most popular cloud-based VOIP service. Since being bought out by Microsoft for $8.5 billion in 2011 the company has grown to more than 300 million users and now accounts for 34% of all international calls. Some people don’t want to use Skype though. Reports of poor customer service, in-call interference, or even a general dislike for anything touched by Microsoft all contribute to some potential users staying away.

What alternatives do these users have available to them? CloudTweaks offers four Skype replacements…


Grasshopper styles itself as a more business-orientated solution than Skype. The service provides many of the features found in expensive office ‘Private Branch Exchange’ systems for a fraction of the cost. Features include support for multiple users (each with their own extension), individual greetings, voicemail, web access and notifications by email or text message, as well as the ability to have local or toll-free numbers for people to call you on.

The service is more expensive than the comparative Google and Microsoft services thanks to the advanced features available. The cheapest plan is $12 per month, though the most popular plan is $49 per month for 2,000 minutes. The most expensive plan is $199 per month for 10,000 minutes.

Google Hangouts

Google Hangouts is the most obvious replacement for Skype. While some users might baulk at using Google products in the same way that some hesitate to use Microsoft or Apple devices, this service is unquestionably the most widely used and full-featured. Google Hangouts launched in mid-2013 as a result of the homogenisation of several independent Google products such as Google Talk, Google Plus Hangouts, and Google Plus Messenger.

The software can replace most features of Skype. While it won’t allow you to directly call landline telephones until it merges with Google Voice later this year, both video conferencing and document collaboration are both supported.


ooVoo is messaging and voice/video calling service that features instant messaging, text chat, video calls, and twelve-way video conferencing. A unique aspect of the program is its ability to make calls directly from your web browser to other PCs without the need for software to be installed.

The service’s file and screen sharing works well and is great for collaborative work and online meetings. Purchasing premium credits allows you to call landline numbers in over seventy countries at reasonable rates, as well as connect landline callers to conference calls. Unfortunately, of all Skype’s competitors, ooVoo has the most expensive PC-to-phone calls.

Before installing the desktop software you need to be aware that the free version is ad-supported. It will also try and install the ‘Ask Toolbar’ when you run the installer – be vigilante when clicking through the installation options.


This California-based start-up was launched in September 2009 by Uri Raz and Eric Setton – both of whom remain at the company as CEO and CTO respectively. The service already boasts 200 million users worldwideTango is a free app that, in addition to video calls, is also optimised for voice calls, texting, sharing, and playing games. It is mainly aimed at the mobile market, with most of its users using the Android or iOS client to access the service, though there is also a PC client available.

Critics of the service say video quality is sometimes uneven, and there are occasional delays and poor voice-syncing in video calls.

Your Opinion?

Do you like Skype? Have you found a suitable alternative? Let us know in the comments below.

By Daniel Price

Price Wars In The Cloud?

Price Wars In The Cloud?

Price Wars in the Cloud?

My first experience with exactly how competition benefits the consumer was when the gas stations on opposite corners in my home town kept lowering the price of gasoline, in turn, until my dad joked that soon one of them was going to pay him to take their gas. Since then, I’ve seen numerous price wars, from deep price cuts on electronics and popular toys near the end of a slow holiday season to airline marketing ploys in the 80s and 90s that made the cost of flying less expensive, in many cases, than driving to the same destination.

We haven’t seen much cheap gasoline or inexpensive plane fares recently, but those of us who keep an eye on the tech industry are seeing what appears to be the beginning of a price war between the big players in the cloud provider space, as Microsoft, Google and Amazon try to woo customers in efforts to establish a lead as cloud computing comes into its own.

You can blame it on (or, as customers shopping for a cloud provider, give credit to) Google for starting it. In March, at the Google Cloud Platform Live event in San Francisco, the company announced that they were drastically cutting prices on many of their enterprise cloud services, including Google Compute Engine, App Engine and Cloud Storage.

With prices on these core services reduced by a little under 30 percent to as much as 85 percent (for big data analytics service BigQuery), top competitors had little choice but to respond with price cuts of their own if they didn’t want to lose their business to Google. Sure enough, the very next day after Google’s announcement, Amazon did a copycat routine, making the same sort of announcement at its own Amazon Web Services Summit. Amazon’s cuts weren’t quite as dramatic, percentage-wise, but at 35 to 65 percent were still some of the largest price drops the company had ever instituted. A few days later, Microsoft followed suit, announcing that it was following suit, matching AWS’s pricing, effective May 1.

In the wake of their opening salvo in this price war, Google’s Cloud Platform director suggested that cloud pricing should be following Moore’s Law, which would imply that prices drop by half every 18 months to two years. That sounds great, to those in the market for a cloud service. However, not everybody was impressed. As noted in the link above, an IBM spokesperson dismissed the cuts as “less than meets the eye” and warned that customers may not get the same level of service at the lower prices.

One thing that price wars do is make thoughtful customers suspicious. When prices drop to a certain point, you have to wonder whether quality will suffer. Will providers overload their servers to keep up with the competition and still retain their profit margins? Will customers’ performance suffer and users’ experience be diminished?

As with most products and services, price alone should never be the deciding factor in selecting between competing options, but the business (and human) reality is that we all want to get as much as possible for our money. Low prices get our attention. Now, with these large providers attempting to match one another in pricing, it’s more important than ever to look more deeply into what each is offering and how the services themselves stack up.

That means, in addition to many other factors, looking at the hardware and software being used by each provider to run its services. What are the architectural differences in their networks? For example, Google’s virtual instances are diskless and use NAS, whereas Amazon’s use local SSDs. How do the hypervisors compare? What are the CPU clock rates for different types of instances? How much memory is available?

Adrian Cockcroft did a good analysis of these differences on, and it’s a useful supplement to my comprehensive five-part series on Selecting a Cloud Provider that was published over on Together, they can help you navigate the maze of pricing and other options when you make the commit to go “to the cloud.”

debBy Debra Littlejohn Shinder

Debra Littlejohn Shinder is a former police officer/criminal justice instructor who now makes her living as an IT analyst, author, trainer and speaker. She has written or contributed to 26 books, published over 800 articles and has been living online, along with her husband Tom (whom she met via the Internet), since the mid-1990s.

Searching For Content In The Cloud – The Problem And The Solution

Searching For Content In The Cloud – The Problem And The Solution

Searching For Content in the Cloud – The Problem and the Solution

With a continually growing number of different apps and storage locations based in the cloud, both personal and corporate data is more widely spread than ever before. Long gone are the days when employees would keep all their data on one machine or on a single company-wide server, instead diaries, databases, financial statements and important documents are all saved across any number of cloud services.


What’s The Problem?

Companies have now amassed huge amounts of data. From simple documents and spreadsheets to sales data and corporates accounts, this data is now saved on a wide range of separate and individual data silos. It is not uncommon for a company to use in excess of ten different cloud services. At least one of Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Office 365, Skype, Salesforce and Google Drive are now used by 75 percent of businesses in the United States.

Accessing this data easily and efficiently quickly becomes a nightmare for users. Before the advent of the cloud users could easily search their own PC or a local server, but with the data now spread so widely this is no longer possible. Individually logging in to multiple cloud storage accounts and then conducting several searches is a tedious and time-consuming operation.

The problem is exacerbated by the number of devices and operating systems used. Businesses now have employees who use both company-issued and personal smartphones, laptops, BYODs and tablets to access, create and edit data – all of which make it increasingly more difficult to track the location of important files and documents.

What’s The Solution?

Luckily several companies are trying to address the problem. One such company is UK-based Storage Made Easy. They were founded in 2008 and have historically specialised in helping companies unify private/public company data and privately-used employee cloud data into a single converged infrastructure. This has allowed IT departments to regain control of what can be termed ‘cloud data sprawl’ whilst also giving them a way to monitor, secure, and audit all data silos from a single access point.

They have recently launched their new service called ‘Cloud Content Search’. The service aims to solve the problem of dispersed data by offering a unified search for both private and cloud stored data, with search results presented on a single screen on any desktop or device. With forty five different cloud services supported – including Salesforce, Amazon, SharePoint, Alfresco, FTP, and DropBox – the developers claim that Cloud Content Search provides the glue between all of a company’s structured content.

With native clients for Mac, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone, and including BYOD management support, the service is arguably already the best in its field. The service boasts excellent management tools for administrators, such as file auditing, file access control, IP address logging, Active Directory integration, and geo-location recordings. The developers have also included high-level AES 256 bit encryption.

After being nominated as one of November 2013’s ‘Ten Hot Tech Start-ups’ on CRN and having recently secured an additional $1 million second seed round funding in February 2014, its clients can be certain that an already excellent service is only going to keep improving in the future.

Your Thoughts?

How does your business search across its multiple data sources? Perhaps you are already a client of Storage Made Easy? Let us know in the comments below.

By Daniel Price

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How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

How To Take Advantage Of “As-A-Service” To Build Business Value

For an IT professional whose status was typically defined by the performance efficiencies of the technology in their data center, it can be a difficult reality to accept that the business value users are able to realize from technology has become the new standard by which all of IT is now being measured. It’s not the technology alone that transforms a business. It’s the way the business accesses and uses that technology that is transformative.

Successful organizations today, as a result, are focusing on transforming their businesses not their technology. For example: “The cloud,” while using enhanced technology at its core, is fundamentally business-model based. For businesses to most effectively harness the power of the cloud, they must change their thinking from how to obtain, manage and pay for technology to how to build, expand and strengthen their business.

Focusing on business outcome instead of acquiring technology is leading savvy CIOs and IT pros to embrace the “as-a-service” model. The business case is compelling: Outsourcing aspects of the IT department’s function by purchasing those functions “as a service” can offload repetitive tasks, reduce capital expenditures and increase the time the IT team has to focus on more strategic work. The key is determining which “as-a-service” functions will be of most benefit to your business.

Here are seven ways to build business value with “as-a-service” solutions:


  • Software as a Service (SaaS): Software providers excel in designing solutions for vertical markets, but the delivery of that software in an as-a-service model can be challenging. By partnering with a cloud provider who can tailor a SaaS solution to the provider’s product and market, software providers are better able to provide consistent, always-up service to their clients without the cost and hassle of creating and maintaining the in-house infrastructure required to do the job. Likewise, for enterprise organizations that want to access software on a subscription basis, finding a software provider that is going to market in this manner means faster implementations and a subscription fee that can spin up or down with required usage.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS): Need access to additional compute resources from time to time, but not often enough to justify building them in house? Consider an on-demand IaaS offering that is a self-managed, multi-tenant public cloud infrastructure providing the flexible compute resources, memory and storage necessary to complete projects such as test and development, proof of concept, training, bursting or other short-term needs.
  • Data Center-as-a-Service (DCaaS): Data centers are typically purpose-built with a 15- to 20-year lifespan, while hardware refreshes must happen every three to four years. So it’s safe to say that, if a data center is between five and 10 years old, there are going to be some major deficiencies. Outsourcing select data center functions to the cloud, co-locating a data center, or deploying an energy-efficient, high-density computing modular data center may be the answer.
  • Storage as a Service: Legacy storage simply wasn’t designed with today’s uses in mind. That means there are systemic gaps that may leave an organization exposed to new pressures placed upon it by unpredictable workloads and unrestrained data growth. Most organizations can take advantage of cloud storage, particularly if they have legal requirements to retain large volumes of data for years, including unstructured data like pictures, films and radiology studies, which can result in petabytes of storage and prohibitive costs for media and physical storage. Storage-as-a-service offers affordable monthly terms and the ability to easily increase storage service levels as needed.
  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS): DRaaS solutions are prepackaged services that provide a standard DR failover to a cloud environment. Customers can buy these services on a pay-per-use basis with varying rates based on required recovery point objectives (RPOs) and recovery time objectives (RTOs). Service providers either deploy agents to replicate data and applications or use image-based backups to send data to the cloud.
  • IT Service Desk-as-a-Service: Certain IT functions contribute to the competitive advantage of an organization, but running a service desk is not usually one of them. If outsourcing an IT service desk can cut costs and increase the level of service to end users without sacrificing quality or impacting competitive advantage, it’s clearly something that IT pros should examine for their organization.
  • ITSM – The Mortar in an As-A-Service World: Worried about maintaining control with so many “as-a-service” choices? IT Service Management (ITSM) is a discipline that aligns the delivery of information technology (IT) services with the business at hand. The purpose is to deliver end-to-end services that meet end-user needs. This task has been made more difficult by the introduction of services into the business from providers other than IT, such as cloud services and SaaS, and by the consumerization of service consumption. ITSM is the mortar that holds together the individual components of the new IT delivery model. It’s the solution that maintains order and keeps the reins of control firmly entrenched in the hands of the IT department.

kevinBy Kevin Gruneisen, Logicalis Senior Director Cloud and Data Center Solutions

Kevin has nearly 30 years of experience in the Infrastructure Technology business. His key responsibilities at Logicalis are focused on matching Logicalis’ capabilities with the cloud and data center needs of its customers. Kevin joined Logicalis in 2004 when Logicalis acquired Solution Technology, Inc. He began his career in technology with IBM in 1984. 

Pinup: WalkMe Secures $11 Million Venture Capital Funding

Pinup: WalkMe Secures $11 Million Venture Capital Funding

WalkMe Secures $11 Million in Recent Round of Venture Capital Funding

The aptly-named startup WalkMe is revolutionizing the way customers navigate company websites, and they provide a more effective method for businesses to use to train their employees. Their product makes help menus and FAQs, which can themselves be a headache for users, obsolete by offering a cloud-based platform that provides on-screen guides for site navigation, with step-by-step instructions popping up as text balloons, so users never even have to leave the page when they need help.logo (1)

The quality of their product has earned WalkMe some serious attention from investors. WalkMe secured $11 million in a recent round of financing led by Scale Venture Partners. This surge of funds more than doubles the company’s overall investment total, which, including the recent addition of $11 million, now stands at $17.5 million since WalkMe was founded in 2011. With this money, WalkMe plans to continue to fuel its expansion by adding new, highly skilled employees and reaching out to prospective customers. WalkMe has already worked with big names like Amazon Web Services, Cisco, Black & Decker, and US Foods.

Over the past year, WalkMe has doubled the size of its staff. The $11 million brings with it a new addition to the staff: Rory O’Driscoll, a partner at Scale Venture Partners, will now be a member of the WalkMe Board of Directors. O’Driscoll had this to say about WalkMe: “Great companies start with great products and the best software products need no explanation once you see them. The minute I saw WalkMe, I knew that enterprises would adopt it. [Their product] puts a stake in the heart of the passive, offline FAQ and Help menu and instead, provides a step-by-step guide at the point of interaction.

Dan Adika, CEO of WalkMe, commented on the future of his startup: “We see a considerable growing market demand for technologies that simplify the user experience and allow for increased productivity, higher overall value and lower total cost of ownership. We have big plans for 2014 and beyond, and we have plenty of positions open for smart people who share our passion. We chose Scale Venture Partners because they were excited, not intimidated, by our ambitious vision of changing the way people use software and websites.”

Businesses in the United States collectively spend more than $150 billion annually on employee training. These businesses would be smart to use WalkMe to cut costs and chip away at this $150 billion figure, and many reputable corporations have already done so. WalkMe is another example of a startup that is using cloud computing in an innovative manner to make the business community more efficient as a whole, while making a tidy profit for themselves along the way.

By Adam Ritchie

Pinup: Piston – Makes Creating Servers Easy

Pinup: Piston – Makes Creating Servers Easy

Piston Cloud Computing Makes Creating and Managing Private Cloud Servers Easy with OpenStack 3.0 


What is OpenStack?

OpenStack is a project that shares a free, open source cloud computing Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), written in the Python coding language. This project was initiated by Rackspace Hosting and NASA in July 2010. Big name tech companies such as Cisco, Dell, Intel, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Go Daddy and Yahoo! have all contributed processing, storage and networking resources to the OpenStack community.

Who is Piston Cloud Computing?

In 2011, Piston was formed by some of the original creators of the OpenStack project. Their objective is to further the growth of the OpenStack project, while also providing a software product that uses advanced systems intelligence to make managing IT infrastructure as simple as possible.

What Does Piston OpenStack 3.0 Offer Businesses?

OpenStack 3.0 is a turn-key piece of software, providing all the software a business needs to set up its own private cloud server, with a focus on making cloud server management easy for businesses. This software solution is built on the lightweight Linux Iocane Micro-OS, and also uses the high-availability capabilities of Moxie Runtime Environment. These two elements work together to ensure your private cloud is insulated and protected from events such as hardware failures, operator errors and power outages.

OpenStack is one of the hottest trends in cloud computing today, and OpenStack 3.0 offers business the easiest way to take advantage of the project. The interface is intuitive enough, complete with tabbed pages, big font and easy to read graphs, all polished with some vivid flashes of red and green and rounded off window edges for a finely-tuned, modern look. Some of the more technologically challenged users out there may want to register for an introductory course in operating Piston OverStack in order to fully understand how they can build a private cloud that will meet their business’s needs.


Another key feature of OpenStack 3.0 is its scalability. Piston uses its trademarked Null-Tier architecture, which is hyper-converged and provides storage, networking and management from every last server. This is a technique some of the founders of Piston used when they were working at NASA in 2008.

Piston Co-founder and  CTO Josh McKenty has made some bold statements regarding their product; in his February 2014 interview with Forbes, McKenty claimed that OpenStack 3.0 is the “last OpenStack you’ll ever try”. With its many advanced features and unparalleled ease of use, OpenStack 3.0 certainly does raise the standards of what will be expected of future OpenStack products.

By Adam Ritchie

CloudTweaks Comics
Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Are CEO’s Missing Out On Big Data’s Big Picture?

Are CEO’s Missing Out On Big Data’s Big Picture?

Big Data’s Big Picture Big data allows marketing and production strategists to see where their efforts are succeeding and where they need some work. With big data analytics, every move you make for your company can be backed by data and analytics. While every business venture involves some level of risk, with big data, that risk…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

The Digital Twin  How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future. In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…


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