Category Archives: SaaS

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Cloud technologies are known to offer many benefits, but it’s safe to say that two words dominate expectations when it comes to development cycles: faster and nimbler. As more organizations implement agile development, it’s becoming clear that expedited time to market is an expected standard – and so is the speedy development that goes along with it.

As fast turnarounds and flexible production become a baseline of cloud development, so does the necessity for developers to fix, tweak, change and adapt as they go. On a sprint, it’s tempting to prioritize speed over completion, especially when a deadline for an impatient client is drawing closer. As a result, some developers are tempted to rush and cut corners in an effort to meet the delivery deadlines. Because of this, many in our field are becoming familiar with the term “technical debt.”

The danger, of course, is that even though those shortcuts can seem like an efficient way to achieve speed to market, they can damage teams in other ways. For instance, last year when LinkedIn suffered a hack and millions of email addresses were stolen, the company was harshly accused of cutting corners, which led to the vulnerability. Whether they did or did not is still debatable, however the cost to the brand and revenue were apparent from the mere idea that the company scrimped when it came to coding.

Every organization that’s using agile should be well aware that sometimes cutting corners can turn into technical debt that will cost your organization later – and can ultimately cause deadlines to be missed, sabotaging the same cycle time you were trying to protect.

Managing technical debt

Many developers make the mistake of thinking they know what corners they can cut without sacrificing quality. But as development evolves and uncompleted changes and abandoned directions pile up, the team can find themselves staring at a serious technical debt that must be paid.

The causes of debt are fairly common. The pressure to release a product prematurely, a lack of collaboration and knowledge-sharing, or a lack of thoughtful testing or code review and key documentation, are just a few dynamics that can lead to a significant amount of debt. So how do you keep this from happening to your team?

One tip to keep in mind is resolving issues as soon as they appear instead of putting them on a back burner. The earlier the stage of detection, the less expensive those issues will be to fix. Issues left unresolved, on the other hand, will expand into a technical debt that will eventually demand more time and money in eliminating. As one example, consider legacy code where the software engineers spend so much effort in keeping the system running, thereby supporting the debt that there’s not enough time to add new features to the product without additional expense.

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Common shortcuts – and their costs

When work cycles are on the line, developers tend to cut some of the same corners over and over. A good example is Quality Assurance work, such as code reviews, unit testing, integration tests and system tests. Many developers feel comfortable skipping tasks here for one simple reason. Because this is work undertaken to validate the code, rather than actually writing the code (other than corrections found by the QA activities), they assume it can be eliminated with minimal risk.

The truth is that cutting corners here can mean sacrificing knowledge and productivity. While it might not be immediately apparent, the overall productivity of the team tends to be higher during a lot of these activities since they increase interactive learning within the team, which in turn leads to higher levels of output.

One way to protect this valuable phase is to implement processes that are used as a check list among every development cycle. In my company, we call this Tiempo Quality System (TQS), a defined set of best practices and processes that standardizes the engineering process. By using a configurator that ensures best practice QA activities are defined up front, TQS minimizes overhead while maximizing overall team productivity. Similar systems can easily be implemented among any development team and are a great way to eliminate technical debt.

Managing quick cycles without cutting corners

All of this might sound as if agile developers need to choose between delivering on fast-paced cycles or executing on solid development. Rest assured, both are possible.

One solution is tracking velocity to produce data that shows the production delays resulting from a backlog of coding issues. By demonstrating the exact fault lines that jeopardize product quality, developers can head off debt at the start. Things like Code Reviews should be looked at not merely as QA activities, but as opportunities for the team to learn together, create improvements on producing the code and work towards optimization.

The shortcuts worth taking

Developers must accept that the pressure to cut corners will never go away. So is it taking a shortcut ever acceptable? Under some circumstances, yes. One category that qualifies would be issues that aren’t showstoppers when working on release or deadline driven products. In this situation, rather than delaying time to market, refactoring can and should be implemented after meeting the deadline.

Predictable release schedules, deadline adherence, and expedited development cycles are good things and should always be prioritized in intelligent cloud development. At the same time, it’s critical to adopt a long view and not sacrifice quality in the pursuit of speed. Manage your technical debt during development and you’ll find it that much easier to deliver a high-performing product – on deadline.

By Bruce Steele

Bruce Steele is the COO of Tiempo Development. He drives Tiempo’s software engineering, professional services, consulting and customer support initiatives. Mr. Steele is a seasoned executive with over 25 years of management experience in the areas of operations, corporate development, sales and strategic planning with leading technology firms. He can be reached at bsteele@tiempodevelopment.com.

Private And Public Cloud Migration Standards

Private And Public Cloud Migration Standards

Cloud Migration Standards

Ever since cloud computing has seen mainstream adoption, the ability to migrate data between public or private clouds is becoming a key concern, especially due to the large size and the cost involved in the switch. The first question that comes to mind when discussing cloud migration is if there are any cloud standards that will ensure interoperability? This is because in the absence of such frameworks, the effort of translation or manual data transfer operations might exceed budgets, especially for large public clouds. Hence it is essential to understand if there are any interoperability standards that may help in the migration. Another key point is to understand the reasons behind a cloud migration whose assessment will justify such a shift.

We can say that cloud interoperability is still a topic under discussion by various cloud providers including HP, Red Hat, Rackspace, Citrix etc. The forum known as ‘OpenStack’ is promoting to build an open platform with open standards that various cloud providers can integrate in their systems making them more interoperable. The platform is backed by several players as seen in this list of supporting companies and many are hopeful that the cloud community will soon witness a complete set of standards along with guidelines to form an OpenStack certified cloud system. The standard is expected to cover all major components in the cloud including compute, networking, storage and OpenStack shared services running on standard hardware and providing an OpenStack dashboard. The custom user applications will run on top of this framework. This is collectively known as OpenStack cloud operating system that is easier to move between public and private cloud setups due to ease of interoperability.

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Another organization that runs by the name of Open Data Centre Alliance (ODCA) is also working to formalize the a specifications set for enterprise ready cloud. They have released a virtual machine interoperability usage white paper that describes their suggestions with examples from a test bed which features several offerings in this proposal along with architecture diagrams. The paper concludes with the statement that, “A capability for VM interoperability is an important precondition to truly realize the oft expressed benefits of virtualized clouds, such as the ability to balance resources through fungible pools of resources, business continuity and load balancing by leveraging distributed publicly available resources, as well as demonstrable avoidance of lock in to a single Cloud Provider, platform or technology.”

There is a cost associated with cloud migration which becomes a significant factor in making a decision about this move. The key factors to consider include IT service reimplementation, data destruction and sanitization, developers resource training, user guidance, regulatory compliance, vendor lock-ins and portability. Hence it comes down to whether or not this shift is justified in terms of expenditure, downtime and future gain in the business. Ideally one should look into cloud systems can support at least one open standard to facilitate future migration.

By Salam UI Haq

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications Cloud…

gives enterprises an opportunity to streamline all their business operations into one big place, the “Cloud”. With multitudes of small, medium and big enterprises embracing the Cloud and the early adopters broadening their penetration, why should communications be left behind? For years, voice communications systems within an organization, big or small, were never considered to be a good candidate for deployment on the Cloud under a SaaS or IaaS model. Thanks to the “liberalization” of communication technologies, Cloud based communications have made their way into the Cloud and are here to stay. Services like Twilio have now made it easier than ever to build enterprise communication services which entirely reside on the Cloud, saving customers the cost, complexity and time it requires to set up an on-premise voice communication infrastructure. Customer services, both internal and external will stand to benefit the most.

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

In the early days of phone based customer service, complete voice routing and phone systems had to be installed in a dedicated customer care “call center”. This changed with IP based voice systems which promised significant cost savings, both in terms of infrastructure required to operate a service center and also the cost of voice calls. With Cloud, another major shift is happening, serving voice based services directly from the Cloud, without the need for sophisticated and bulky infrastructure and delivering better, if not same quality of service. Cloud communications have also achieved something which even IP telephony could not: liberalization of voice communication services. This is evident with the success which Twilio has achieved, both in terms of adoption and the quality it delivers. What’s interesting is that even independent developers can put together a voice communication service within minutes! I personally tried it to route calls from an online number, which I purchased on Twilio, creating a voice menu for the number and then routing the call to the relevant person based on what the caller selects. It took me less than an hour to achieve this.

Enterprises now have a plethora of collaboration and communication services to meet diversified and changing needs and requirements of the modern workforce with the goal to increase productivity and keep the focus on business instead of managing the infrastructure. Unifying all these collaboration and communication services deployed in-house for employees and external customer care services not only improves employee collaboration and customer care but also addresses the changing workplace with small teams placed remotely and home based or mobile employees. Solutions served out of the Cloud give enterprises, small and big, the opportunity to deploy UC (Unified Communication) and extract all the benefits which comes with this strategy while at the same time cut down on IT cost, both in terms of the spend on infrastructure and its management.

Frost & Sullivan has announced an eBroadcast featuring talks from Cloud communication industry experts. This eBroadcast will give you an update on the Cloud UC (Unified Communications) and external customer care markets. It will also discuss some of the benefits of cloud communications and will recommend strategies for selecting the right cloud solution and provider.

To register, visit this page.

By Salam UI Haq

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

The global enterprise mobility market is expanding at a rapid rate – predicted to bring in $140 billion a year by 2020. As the market continues to expand, so do the varying needs of mobile businesses who rely on cloud-based solutions. For mobile employees, having full product functionality at their fingertips is critical, and cloud-based services enable a much more efficient solution than legacy apps.

However, companies shouldn’t assume that “mobile” equates to “road warrior.” Employees that are primarily office-based also find value in access to data on mobile devices. Applications that provide access to specific, critical pieces of time-sensitive data are a value-add for treasury.

One example is the corporate treasurer, who is mainly in-office and benefits from a consolidated treasury management system for cash management, payments, and treasury transactions. There are times when treasurers can’t access their desktops or laptops. In fact, recent data revealed more than 66 percent of finance professionals process cash flow transactions from their mobile devices. Even though they don’t need access to every piece of information in the system, they will have urgent tasks, such as approving an urgent payment, or viewing a key report that requires instant response. In these instances, a mobile application that extends the necessary functionality from their existing treasury system is a quick and easy solution to meet their needs. It pulls core data from the cloud, without the need for a complex interface or large amounts of processing power.

Not surprisingly, the same requirements are just as important to everyone in the treasury team. That is why, when evaluating treasury technology, organizations are seeking cloud providers that offer a mobile application to extend a system’s core functions directly to employees’ mobile devices, addressing the on-demand needs of the treasury team.

The consumerization of IT is a driving factor behind mobile app adoption within the enterprise, and has impacted almost every line of business. Given the sensitive financial data that corporate treasurers access on a daily basis, it’s critical they take precautions when integrating mobile applications into their daily routine. To ensure sensitive information remains safe and secure, below are four tips organizations should consider when launching mobile applications specifically aimed at streamlining the role of a corporate treasurer:

Identify core needs: At the recent 2013 Hosting and Cloud Transformation Summit, 451 Research chief analyst Eric Hanselman noted that “enterprise IT risks being left in the dust” if they don’t speed up their adoption of cloud computing. While this is true, it is also critical that organizations don’t dive headfirst into mobile cloud adoption when dealing with the treasury department, where executives leverage mobile applications to tap into sensitive financial information. Enterprise IT must first identify the key needs of the corporate treasurer, which are very different than the requirements of a road warrior. They rarely require all the bells and whistles that some mobile applications provide. Rather, they need a solution that extends core treasury management functionality to their mobile device. This empowers them to make informed, time-sensitive financial decisions on the go.

Focus on security: Security is a top concern when it comes to mobile cloud computing. This should be at the top of an organization’s checklist when approving mobile cloud applications for any line of business, including the corporate treasury department. The good news is cloud-based software is now trusted in business-critical environments by many large enterprise and government agencies. When evaluating applications for the treasury department, an organization needs to make sure its solution adheres to the latest and most rigorous security standards to ensure its data is completely secure.

Cost: Treasury teams do not have unlimited budgets, so mobile solutions must be cost-effective. This almost always rules out in-house developed or internally hosted/supported software applications with custom designed mobile access. Mobile access must be native to the application and not require customization to put in the hands of the treasury team.

Ease of Use: While most employees leverage mobile applications in their daily lives, this does not mean they will know how to navigate all applications introduced into the business. It is critical that mobile applications improve ease of use and are as intuitive as any mobile application that one would download from the cloud.

In summary, as more organizations deploy cloud-based solutions to mobilize their workforce, the treasury department should not be left out simply because they don’t frequently travel for business. Cloud-based services and mobile applications bring numerous benefits to the treasurer. If implemented correctly, extending the core functionality of a cloud-based treasury management system to the mobile environment can streamline processes and increase efficiency.

bob-stark_smallBy Bob Stark

Bob Stark is responsible for global product and marketing strategy at Kyriba, with a focus on thought leadership, product positioning, and market development. Bob is involved in a variety of strategic initiatives including risk and hedging compliance, eBAM, supply chain finance, SWIFT connectivity, and global business alliances.  Bob is a 15-year veteran of the treasury technology industry, with a particular focus on treasury management systems. He has previously held strategic roles at WallStreet Systems, Thomson Reuters, and Selkirk Financial Technologies. 

He is a regular guest speaker at treasury conferences and is an active member of the Association for Financial Professionals.

Cloud Growing Pains – Failure Is Inevitable

Cloud Growing Pains – Failure Is Inevitable

Growing up with floppy disks as the standard for storage was not pretty, my school days were filled with corrupt assignments and missing files because the things were very fragile and tended to fail at the slightest sign of an electrical field. And there was no use bringing a backup floppy disk because chances are that would fail too. Not to mention random crashes on very slow computers and you quickly learn to save fast and save often, then keep lots and lots of backup. Now fast forward decades later and we have cheaper and faster computers, reliable flash storage, the internet, and even the Cloud. We do not even need to carry our data with us physically because of online file storage services.

But some things never change, and that is failure and all of its forms. It seems to be looming in every corner, and there is no escape, not for any technology. So the core best practice that any business trying to make it in the Cloud could have, is to expect failure and plan for it. After all, each node whether a server, hard drive or networking equipment consists of mass produced commodity hardware parts that may or may not last years. All Cloud service providers architect and design their systems so that when one or several pieces of equipment fail, the system or environment should be able to recover automatically.

Elasticity and fault tolerance actually go hand in hand. Elasticity requires bootstrapping just like fault tolerance. And the reason to bootstrap may be to meet additional demand (elasticity), or sometimes to replace a box which is having problems (fault tolerance). So basically when a new box is required, one boots and is given orders and then it finds and installs required resources to become what piece of equipment it needs to be. This should happen especially when others start failing.

Even though, the Cloud provider has architected his systems to be elastic and fault tolerant, does not mean that your existing software that you are bringing to the Cloud becomes elastic and Fault tolerant as well. If you want to move to the Cloud you have to architect your application to make full use of the advantage of fault tolerance and elasticity provided by the Cloud. Moving unoptimized spaghetti code to the Cloud is just asking for trouble, just like migrating a set of tightly coupled objects. The Cloud is forcing developers to architect their applications to work and take advantage of the elastic and fault-tolerant nature of the Cloud. And you do not just plan for failure within the Cloud but of the Cloud itself. But it is a fool’s errand to count on a single provider. You should consider using many different providers as elements in your vast enterprise. This also takes care of elasticity and fault tolerance, by removing any single point of failure.

By Abdul Salam

Move Over Brick And Mortar, Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

Move Over Brick And Mortar, Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

Education-As-A-Service Is Taking Over

As Bob Dylan once said, “the times they are a-changin’.” Its a verse that sticks like glue in the back of my mind when I reflect on the technology landscape today. Just a few years ago, data analytics services were few and far between and cloud computing unheard of. For example, cloud-related spending was only 4 percent of the total IT market in 2009, but according to IDC this is expected to increase by 12 percent — equaling $55 billion — by 2014.

Technology is advancing at a rapid pace. What is innovative today will become old news before you can bat an eye. Systems like the cloud will continue to evolve and adapt as technology advances. As businesses strive to remain competitive, it is the IT specialists supporting the transition from old to new technology that are the hamsters caught spinning the wheel. How do you as an IT professional stay up-to-date with the newest technology while retaining a firm understanding of past software?

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If you’re working in IT, one thing you can be sure of is your job will never get boring. With a career devoted to keeping networks and systems humming, you’ve dedicated yourself to a lifetime of continuous learning to stay on top of the latest trends and technology.

Fine-tuning skills and brushing up on certifications has always been part of the IT job description, but in recent years this is becoming less of an option and more of a requirement. To give some perspective: imagine getting your B.A. degree to find out three months later you have to go back to earn another degree and yet another six months after that. IT jobs demand the ability to grasp new technology quickly, and hiring managers are clamoring for people that can master this challenge.

According to the Department of Labor Information, technology employment is expected to grow between 18 to 26 percent for all occupations through 2014. There is a massive growth opportunity in IT that shows no sign of slowing down. Yet, hiring managers struggle to find skilled candidates that are versed both in legacy systems and new technologies like the cloud.

Until recently, the options for IT professionals to hone their skills were limited and often expensive. It’s a challenge that has plagued professionals in the industry for years: how to keep up with a constantly evolving field while juggling a full-time job. In the past, the only answer was time-consuming seminars and costly brick-and-mortar courses. Fitting a career, family and other obligations into the mix make these options less than desirable.

Lately, we’ve seen several companies break down traditional education barriers to provide a viable solution. Lynda.com, Treehouse and my own company TrainSignal are transforming the very foundation on which technology education is built — after all, shouldn’t education be just as innovative as the technology it supports? The flexibility and affordability makes online options appealing, but it’s the real-time capabilities that make it ideal for those working in technology.

Skills that might take months to grasp in classroom curriculums, can now be mastered in a matter of weeks or even days with online platforms. These courses are up-to-date and can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. That means a cloud engineer can brush up on the latest VMWare or Microsoft fundamentals during a moment of free time at work or during a long commute.

If you are a technology professional, the cloud is not just where you work, it’s where you can learn everything you need to know to have a successful career. Whether you are looking to learn how to build an app, spruce up your design skills or take a refresher course in virtualization, online resources are becoming widely available in all areas of technology. It won’t be long before we see that “the times they are a-changin” towards a more skilled, self-educated workforce across all industries.

By Scott Skinger, CEO & Founder, TrainSignalScott Skinger_TrainSignal (1)

Scott’s passion for IT education began when he passed his first certification to become a Novell CNA. Scott went on to teach at several technical schools where he realized traditional IT education was not providing students with the skills they needed to succeed. In 2002 Scott founded TrainSignal, a leader in IT education providing training courses to professionals worldwide. Scott earned a degree from Northern Illinois University in Dekalb, IL and serves on the advisory board of Salute Inc.

Identity And Access Management From The SaaS Application Perspective

Identity And Access Management From The SaaS Application Perspective

The SaaS Application Perspective

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) has taken the enterprise by storm as the go-to delivery model for applications, and the cloud service is here to stay…for better or worse. Enterprises look to its benefits including dramatic cost savings, app availability from anywhere, and seamless updates and upgrades pushed to users from the SaaS provider.

There’s certainly no trepidation surrounding the benefits that the cloud rains down on enterprises, but what makes CISOs uneasy about SaaS delivery of apps is the lack of control and visibility into who has access to them while floating around in the cloud. Enterprises can obviously call the shots when data and apps are stored on-premise, but the fear of data breaches is amped up when applications and data, and who controls the access to them, is out of the hands of the enterprise and in the hands of the SaaS provider.

So what should a SaaS application developer or provider do so enterprises can govern their identity and access issues effectively? There are three key Identity and Access Management (IAM) areas that deserve close attention.

Authentication

SaaS apps can take several routes for authenticating users. The first is independent authentication with a private user directory and independent user account management. This is a poor choice because it forces the SaaS application to manage passwords and forces users to remember separate credentials for the SaaS app.  In addition, from an enterprise perspective, supporting joiners, movers and leavers (who’s moving in and out of your organization) here becomes difficult.

A variant of the independent option is internal authentication with a private user directory synched to an external user repository, usually Active Directory. While this approach may seem to be fine for a single application, as the number of applications scales, IT administrators have trouble managing the synching, and the risk of a breach goes up significantly when credentials are transmitted outside the perimeter.

The ideal authentication setup for a SaaS app is token-based authentication and SSO based on directory federation. SAML (Secure Access Markup Language) tokens issued by corporate identity providers fit the bill perfectly. Why? A single corporate username and password enables access across multiple SaaS applications. The process is intelligent, too, because user attributes relevant to authorization can be delivered in the token, and “just-in-time” provisioning (automated account setup for a first-visit user) can be supported.  While this approach requires the management of trust relationships between individual enterprises and the SaaS application in question, and at least basic user account management, the headaches of syncing and having hundreds of passwords are off the table here.

Entitlements

So your users have been authenticated to your SaaS apps. That’s the easy part, but effective management of entitlements – what your users can do within those apps at a fine-grained, nitty-gritty level, is far more difficult.

Most SaaS applications come with their own entitlement model, with internal administration of entitlement policies and an application-specific user interface for defining who gets what entitlements within the application. From an application developer’s perspective, this approach seems convenient, but in reality, it provides poor support for enterprise identity and access lifecycle management and compliance.  Setting up joiners and movers or de-provisioning leavers requires manual intervention, and tracking “who has access to what” often means the creation of application-specific reports.

The best option here is for SaaS applications to support an entitlement model that includes pre-defined application roles, and an API that supports the collection of current user-role and user-entitlement bindings as well as the provisioning or de-provisioning of user-to-role and user-to-entitlement bindings.  With this approach, administering user-to-role policies is done by each enterprise outside of the SaaS application, while the runtime authorization enforcement based on provisioned user bindings or user attributes is done within the SaaS application. Leaving policy administration out of the application and up to the enterprise makes change management and compliance much easier.

The benefit of having application roles is that it’s far easier to track and change user access to SaaS apps when each application’s access can be described in terms of tens of application roles and a few out-of-role entitlements, versus  thousands of entitlements.

It’s likely that a standards-based protocol will emerge someday for the API referenced above, but SPML (Secure Provisioning Markup Language) fell short, and SCIM (Simple Cloud Identity Management), while useful for account and user profile provisioning, doesn’t help with entitlements.

Auditing

Your users have been authenticated and can wield the power they’ve been given by individual application roles and entitlements within SaaS applications. But are you taking notes on every move they make within your organization? Probably not!  Automated logging of user activity for each SaaS app is crucial to both the audit trail needed when the auditor comes knocking and the real-time alerting required by enterprise SOCs (security operations centers). If a subset of the application roles and entitlements for a SaaS app is considered sensitive or privileged, it is up to the SaaS application developer and provider to ensure that the use of this privileged access can be closely and continuously scrutinized.

It is important to note that mobile and cloud computing is causing the Identity and Access Management industry to adopt new models and consider new standards.  OpenID Connect and OAuth, for example, are very promising standards, but SaaS applications targeted for broad-based enterprise use can’t rely exclusively on them today.

While SaaS applications, being outside the perimeter, aren’t inherently ideal for meeting enterprise identity and access lifecycle management and compliance initiatives, SaaS app developers and providers should look to these areas as the first action items when rolling out cloud-based applications across the enterprise.

By Deepak Taneja,

Contributor Deepak Taneja is Founder and CTO of Aveksa, provider of the industry’s most comprehensive Business-Driven Identity and Access Management platform.  By uniquely integrating Identity and Access Governance, Provisioning and Authentication, Aveksa enables enterprises to manage the complete lifecycle of user access for SaaS and On-premise applications and data.  Learn more at www.aveksa.com.

Does Cloud Computing Mean The End Of Traditional Storage Networks?

Does Cloud Computing mean the End of Traditional Storage Networks?

Technically Yes! With cloud’s scalability options attracting SMBs and large businesses towards it and cloud becoming secure with each passing day; we are near to say goodbye to the traditional ways we used to store our data over the network. Though networking is quite difficult to understand especially when one has expertise in building business, let’s check out how things were traditionally and how the cloud is slowing replacing it.

What comprised a traditional storage network?

Storage network or storage networking as the word says is the high speed networking of shared storage devices. This storage network connects to data servers so the data is accessible from anywhere across the network. As your requirements grow, you can connect hundreds of server machines to hundreds or even thousands of storage devices locally (LAN) or over the WAN (Wide Area Network).

How cloud storage works:

As for the cloud storage, you upload your data via a secure internet connection on a 3rd party data center. This 3rd party which is the cloud provider maintains your data and allows you to retrieve it any time by connecting to the server. While these servers require maintenance or repair occasionally or might even fail in an extreme case, the cloud provider stores your files on multiple servers, which is called redundancy so you can access them anytime.

Why companies love to join the cloud?

The reason is simple. The cloud allows you to access your data from anywhere around the world using the internet. Also not just your own enterprise can access but you can easily share with who you want and even work in collaboration with anyone around the world connected through internet. And the best thing is companies especially that of small and medium size now don’t have to worry about developing an in-house IT structure. No worry about buying servers and storage and deploying them making sure that it can cater the business needs nor have to pay for specialized IT experts who look after your network. They can launch their cloud from anywhere within minutes and transfer all their data there while its security is taken care by the vendor.

Where will it go further:

At least we know that this isn’t the end to the tussle between the traditional computing and the cloud. With the internet connection getting better and better and the coming of SSDs in cloud storage it is thought that the cloud will completely make the traditional storage obsolete.

By Pere Hospital,

Pere Hospital (CISSP & OSCP) is the CTO and co-founder of Cloudways Ltd. He has over two decades of experience in IT Security, Risk Analysis and Virtualization Technologies. You can follow Pere on Twitter at @phospital, or learn more about Cloudways at www.Cloudways.com

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Utilizing Digital Marketing Techniques Via The Cloud

Utilizing Digital Marketing Techniques Via The Cloud

Digital Marketing Trends In the past, trends in the exceptionally fast-paced digital marketing arena have been quickly adopted or abandoned, keeping marketers and consumers on their toes. 2016 promises a similarly expeditious temperament, with a few new digital marketing offerings taking center stage. According to Gartner’s recent research into Digital Marketing Hubs, brands plan to…

The Future of M2M Technology & Opportunities

The Future of M2M Technology & Opportunities

The Future Of The Emerging M2M Here at CloudTweaks, most of our coverage is centered around the growing number of exciting and interconnected emerging markets. Wearable, IoT, M2M, Mobile and Cloud computing to name a few. Over the past couple of weeks we’ve talked about Machine to Machine (M2M) such as the differences between IoT and…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

ERP Deployment You know how ERP deployment can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and more popular, it is worth…

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data The modern enterprise is digital. It relies on accurate and timely data to support the information and process needs of its workforce and its customers. However, data suffers from a likability crisis. It’s as essential to us as oxygen, but because we don’t see it, we take it for granted.…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Cloud Architecture These days, Multi-Tier Applications are the norm. From SharePoint’s front-end/back-end configuration, to LAMP-based websites using multiple servers to handle different functions, a multitude of apps require public and private-facing components to work in tandem. Placing these apps in entirely public-facing platforms and networks simplifies the process, but at the cost of security vulnerabilities. Locating everything…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…