Category Archives: SaaS

5 Major Types Of Cloud Infrastructure Options

5 Major Types Of Cloud Infrastructure Options

Cloud Infrastructure

Cloud computing is not an all-or-nothing option. In the past decade, the industry has matured to a point where there are almost a dozen different options to move your data and processes to the cloud. In this post, we will cover the five major options and will talk about the enterprises for whom each of these options are best suited for.

Virtual machines



This is the most common form of cloud setup, where third party service providers give you shared computing resource in their datacenter for an hourly fee. The physical servers at the data center are turned into many virtual server instances, each of which can be run by a different enterprise. Virtual machines can provide you the best utilization of resources by keeping the machines from going idle. This setup is suited for workloads that are highly varying (most websites, blogs) and for smaller enterprises that do not need the flexibility and control of a private cloud. It is very cost-effective, though it might not be suited for high performance computing.

Private Cloud

Private cloud is a dedicated system of servers, managed for a single enterprise. The servers can be either maintained on-premise or off-premise at a third party location. The private cloud provides you greater control and performance, besides providing you greater security for your data and applications. This installation is best suited for industries that are highly regulated (defense, healthcare, etc) and enterprises that run strategic applications that require a high performance.

Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)

In a virtual private cloud option, enterprises can use pay-as-you-go hardware from third parties, while still using their own private IP address space, subnets, router table configuration, etc. This is a more cost-effective option than a private cloud installation with less upfront and ongoing costs. This is suited for enterprises that require the performance and security of a private cloud, but still can’t afford to have a dedicate private cloud.

Hybrid Clouds

Hybrid clouds combine the best of private cloud (security, control) and public cloud (flexibility, cost) installations. In a hybrid cloud installation, the enterprise maintains a private cloud that takes care of the normal workloads and utilize the public cloud during peak workloads and dealing with less sensitive data. This is best suited for organizations dealing with data of various sensitivity and with highly variable workloads.

Bare Metal

Bare Metal cloud installations provide you dedicated hardware at an hourly rate. In traditional cloud installations, where the machines are typically virtualized it can be a problem when you want to have compute intensive operations requiring local resources like databases. For instance, if the other virtual instances in the same machine are hogging the disc storage, your applications might get slower. Bare Metal installations help you avoid that problem and is best suited for more compute intensive applications that have a more predictable workload.

By Balaji Viswanathan

Videographers: Getting Your Head In The Clouds

Getting Your Head In The Clouds

The spread of HD capturing has made video production a storage intensive endeavor. The digital revolution is promising mass decentralization in some video production houses. But how will it work?

Cloud Storage

HD footage can range from 48mb to 153mb per second in readily available cameras like the Canon 7D. A few hours of footage could easily fill a hard-drive, and the reliance by videographers on external hard-drives and USB/fire wire connections has been a frustration for those with high workloads, or those who need to keep archives of their rushes (the raw material from which their finished videos are made).

Cloud storage might not seem a clear-cut solution to storage problems. A year’s subscription for 100gb costs around $139. A 2TB physical hard drive from Hitachi is currently priced at $139.

Chaos Theory

So, the external hard-drive is the obvious choice? Not quite. The floods in Thailand, where most of the world’s hard-drives are produced, have caused a massive shortfall in production. 15% behind projected demand six months on, we’re seeing the inevitable scarcity and price hike. This is a unique opportunity for cloud suppliers to push their solutions, and they’re doing just that, emphasizing other advantages.

Anytime, Anywhere

Cloud based storage is on a shared server, which can be accessed through a username and password, much like any number of websites and web-based services.

Imagine a shoot with a short deadline.  The usual process would go like this:

Get to the location (by car, train, or plane), set up, shoot, switch memory cards, shoot some more, sack up, get back (by car, train or plane), upload footage to external hard drive, editor arrives, editor downloads from external hard drive, editing begins.

With cloud-based services, videography teams can get right into the middle of this process and speed it up. Footage can begin to be uploaded from the minute after it’s taken, the editor can be waiting in the suite to log in and download it, and begin editing shots together straight after they’re taken, instead of hours or days later as is currently commonplace.

Sassy SaaS

Another development of the cloud is ‘Software as a Service’. You’ve probably tried this already without realizing- it’s Google Docs. Google Docs allows remote collaboration from anywhere in the world, by anyone who is involved with the project.

Editing solutions like WeVideo, MixMoov and the open-source Novacut are already available on cloud, allowing multiple collaborators to edit projects. Cloud-based software means you won’t need a high-end system to run it, as with current edit-suites. A fast, solid internet connection and a portal device is all you’ll need. The cloud-drive runs the software for you. This means offline, online, grading and after effects editors can be polishing the same project simultaneously.

These aren’t yet as powerful as most professional editing suites like FCP or Premiere Pro, but the developers are hard at work.

Verdict

There’re already a number of good advantages to Cloud-based storage and software for videography, and they’re about to get better. Early adopters will likely be able to utilize the advantages to the fullest, while still keeping one foot in the traditional edit-suite pool as the transition is made.

By Robert Stanton

Robert is a corporate videographer who has produced short promos, animations and documentaries.  He has acted in and directed fictional short films, and has worked for the: BBC, Film 4 and independent documentary companies.

Why You Should Entrust Your Software Applications And Data To The Clouds

Why You Should Entrust Your Software Applications And Data To The Clouds

There are limitless possibilities in cloud computing. The system runs every software applications an ordinary computer can execute, from general word processing applications to custom-made software application. More often than not, an entity trusts its software and data to run in the clouds because cloud computing offers accessibility 24/7. A customer can access his data and application anytime and anywhere provided there is strong internet connection. Data and software is not stored in a particular computer. In fact, it is not even found within the company’s network.

Business owners rely on cloud computing services because of its promise to bring costs of hardware down. They do not have to purchase advanced hardware because it is being taken care of by the cloud provider. In order for their employees to access the company’s applications and data, these business owners only to need to furnish them with inexpensive computer. There is even no need for a large capacity hard disk to be installed in the computer because everything is in the cloud system.

Entrepreneurs need not buy software in order for their businesses to achieve their goals because the software is provided by the cloud provider. Access to the business applications is given to authorized employees. There is even no need to buy software license per user. Use of software applications in the cloud is usually metered and subscription based.

With the cloud system, businesses do not need to rent more office space for storage devices and servers because the data and the servers are located offsite. Most cloud computing vendors let their clients decide on whether to house their data offsite or on-premise. When customers house their data offsite, less physical office space is needed. Because servers and data storage are no longer housed on-premise, companies have less need for IT support. Problems with regard to servers, software, and data storage are delegated to the cloud system suppliers thus companies save money when there is no more need to employ a lot of IT personnel.

When grid computing is used as backend by the cloud system, the processing power of the network is very robust. Researchers and scientists who need to do complex computations can send their calculation processing to the cloud. Because of the powerful backend, the calculation process is hastened.

However, cloud computing does have its concerns: privacy and security. A lot of business owners do worry about relying on cloud computing for their software and data storage needs. They hesitate to relinquish control because they fear their business information is not safe in the clouds. A lot of vendors, however, counter this by claiming that their reputation speaks for the kind of service they provide. Reputable suppliers do maintain trustworthy security measures in order to protect their clients’ data. A lot of them use advanced and expensive techniques in order to ensure the security of their customers’ information.

Privacy is also another issue business owners raise with cloud computing. These people fear that their privacy can be compromised if they access their applications and data offsite. However, cloud computing providers are quick to counter this by providing secure authentication techniques.

By Florence de Borja

Cloud Computing: 14 Million Reasons to Get With the Program…NOW

Cloud Computing: 14 Million Reasons to Get With the Program…NOW

According to breathtaking new research from Microsoft, the result of a commission to analyst firm IDC, approximately fourteen million new jobs will be created by the year 2015, all of those jobs stemming from a swelling boom in cloud computing. Profits generated from such a boon in cloud activity to skyrocket to more than $1 trillion dollars within the exact same time frame. This combination of revenue heights and a shot in the arm to unemployment woes worldwide could potentially translate into an unprecedented shift in workplace structure. Readers, the take home figure is three years — the amount of time in which cloud’s significance will mushroom.

Those professionals who are not yet cloud savvy should view these three years as an opportunity to self-educate, quickly and deeply. The most critical knowledge is the difference between Infrastructure as a Service, Software as a Service, and Platform as a Service, three cloud essentials which a recent article from Business Insider efficiently elucidates. Yet beyond such bottom-tier information, other crucial basics include an understanding of how cloud interweaves with the issues of the day, such as American governmental policy and European data protection protocol. (Hint: consistent reading of CloudTweaks helps you fulfill this aim with flying colors.)

IT folk, the pressure to step up your cloud prowess is also mounting at great speed. Information Week’s recent cogent article on this subject advises IT professionals to aspire to become a sharp, self-sufficient pundit on all things cloud — the best method to maintain marketability into the coming years. Obviously reading top-quality blogs and journals is a great way to keep in cloud shape. (Please forgive this article’s second shameless CloudTweaks plug.) But knowledge of cloud integration into already existent, traditional systems is also vital. Another important consideration: your skill at quickly and compellingly erecting a private cloud for your own current needs. The most marketable among us show no qualms making private clouds work well.

Even those not directly involved in IT can implement simple cloud intelligence into their quiver of assets. Form an opinion on the current state of cloud’s security; locate and befriend others compelled by cloud computing and discuss the ups and downs of the technology. When in doubt, seek however you can to know a little more about the cloud each day. Failure to mobilize in these next three years will leave stragglers in a different, less desirable cloud – made of dust.

By Jeff Norman

Unmasking Cloud Computing

Unmasking Cloud Computing

People in the Information Technology industry know a lot about cloud computing. However, those not part of the industry, primarily the target market, do have a lot of questions regarding the technology. In fact, a lot of them are surely confused about what cloud really is. Cloud computing is not really a new concept. It is just a different approach to making available IT services which tap the ever increasing power of virtualization technologies and servers which can provide huge computing pools and segregate a single server into various virtual machines which be used on demand.

A public cloud is an IT service which can be accessed by anybody provided he is connected through the internet and has a valid credit card. Payment for this infrastructure is very much akin to those pay-as-you-go services. A public cloud is often managed by a portal which is self-serviced, virtualized infrastructures which are multitenant, and very accessible. A private cloud, on the other hand, is very much like a public cloud but is protected by a firewall to restrict access. It is often accessed through a web-based interface with chargeback and self-service features. Its access is often limited to users within the same business or within a partition of the value chain. A public cloud forces an entity to standardize and institute practices which eventually drives efficiency.

People, who are not very knowledgeable about IT terminologies, may interchange cloud computing with software-as-a-service but experts are quick to point out that software-as-a-service is just a subset of cloud computing. A public cloud can be broken down into platform-as-a-service, infrastructure-as-a-service, and software-as-a-service. Platform-as-a-service delivers software-and-computer to clients, which allows developers to create and deploy applications via the web on a hosted infrastructure. Infrastructure-as-a-service, on the other hand, allows users to access a storage capacity and server remotely. Software-as-a-service provides various software applications through the web.

Cloud computing vendors do not offer long-term contracts thus preventing clients to be locked-in to service for a long time. Most suppliers charge on an as-needed, pay-as-you-go basis. Some providers, like infrastructure-as-a-service vendors, charge on a per-hour basis while those providing storage clouds charge on a per-gigabyte usage monthly. Any software application which runs on a computer can be placed in the cloud but there are applications which are not practical to be put in the cloud like system analysis or disk defragmentation tools. Compliance and regulatory concerns also limits entities from placing applications in the cloud, especially those which involve access of sensitive data. Cloud computing is very popularly used by those who need storage and server capacity, application deployment and development, business and personal applications, collaboration, and IT management.

In general, software applications and data can be moved from one cloud to another. However, there are certain applications which are difficult to move from a cloud to another. There are many vendors who offer services to clients if they want to move their applications from one platform to another. However, there’s no standards-based technology yet to seamlessly transfer applications and data from one cloud platform to the other.

By Florence de Borja

Beyond SFTP: Five Ways To Secure And Manage Your Data Transfer Via The Cloud

Beyond SFTP: Five Ways To Secure And Manage Your Data Transfer Via The Cloud

Unmanaged Data Transfers Mean Risky Business Every day, growing amounts of electronic information are flowing – both inside your business and outside your business to trading partners. Your data – and how efficiently and effectively you handle its transfer – defines your business. It’s part of your competitive advantage. And a lot of it is data that would expose your company to risk if were misdirected, stolen, late or lost.

Think about what travels across your network and the Internet every day:

  • Sensitive information such as financial data, price lists, contracts, and customer data
  • Regulated information, such as human resources data, health-care data, and payment data including creditcard numbers
  • Intellectual property such as CAD files, videos of product prototypes, or product development plans
  • Inventory information and other critical operating data from your point-of-sale systems or external warehouses

This data is being exchanged in various ways, including system-to-system (batch-file uploads, scheduled transfers), system-to-human (scheduled reports), and human-to-human (ad hoc emails and manual FTP uploads).
It’s of course vital that the right data get to the right person or system at the right time. Beyond this, it’s vital that you know – and can prove – that critical data traveled and arrived at its destination securely. Ideally, of course, your data would always use the most economical means of transport. And your data transfers would perform correctly every time – in thousands, tens of thousands or even millions of data transfers a week.  The logistics of making this happen can be overwhelming. The possibilities for human error are many, and the level of risk is unacceptable.

Limitations of Current Approaches

It’s a problem that’s crying for automation. But it requires intelligent automation* to make the right split-second decisions, unaided, for every transfer.

Unfortunately, most solutions for automating secure data transfers aren’t intelligent enough. As a result, the solutions are insecure, costly or imprecise. FTP servers may be cheap, but they are often unreliable and they aren’t secure. The servers are frequently scattered throughout the company, which makes them difficult to manage and govern according to business needs (“FTP spaghetti”). Email is a convenient, familiar way to handle system-to-human and human-to-human exchanges, but it’s notoriously insecure, error-prone, and inefficient at handling large files.

Read the white paper to learn more about securing and managing your data transfer via the cloud…

Microsoft Azure Outage Blamed on Leap Year

Microsoft Azure Outage Blamed on Leap Year

All of us will remember the fears associated with the Y2K problem, where computers’ inability to distinguish between the years 1900 and 2000 was supposed to create a slew of problems. Although problems were never as severe as some doomsday prophets predicted, often due to precautionary measures, there were some incidents that did affect normal life. Now, it seems that another date problem is to blame for Microsoft’s cloud outage late last month.

28 February saw Azure customers facing problems throughout the globe. According to Mary Jo Foley of ZDNet, “Azure problems began with an outage in the Windows Azure Management Service technology, which then spread to the Windows Azure Compute and Access Control parts of the platform. Affected areas included North Europe, North Central US and South Central US regions.” While Microsoft did respond quickly, quite in contrast to the Amazon outage last year (See: Reactions to the Amazon Cloud Outage and the Company’s Explanation), the underlying reason is a major embarrassment to the company.

February 28th, 2012 at 5:45 PM PST Windows Azure operations became aware of an issue impacting the compute service in a number of regions. The issue was quickly triaged and it was determined to be caused by a software bug. While final root cause analysis is in progress, this issue appears to be due to a time calculation that was incorrect for the leap year. Once we discovered the issue, we immediately took steps to protect customer services that were already up and running and began creating a fix for the issue. The fix was successfully deployed to most of the Windows Azure sub-regions and we restored Windows Azure service availability to the majority of our customers and services by 2:57 a.m. PST.” Bill Laing, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Server and Cloud Division, wrote in the company blog.

In other words, Microsoft’s inability to factor in the leap year, a phenomenon that occurs every four years, is to blame. For a company that is so much invested in cloud computing (See: Is Microsoft Taking A Risk By Putting All Its Eggs In The Cloud Computing Basket? ), such an oversight is a major embarrassment. However, considering cloud computing’s relative infancy, consumers may be willing to forgive such indiscretions. At the same time, providers must acknowledge the shortcomings in their knowledge and learn from such incidents. As Charles Babcock of Information Week remarked, “This incident is a reminder that the best practices of cloud computing operations are still a work in progress, not an established science. And while prevention is better than cure, infrastructure-as-a-service operators may not know everything they need to about these large-scale environments.”

By Sourya Biswas

The Distinction Between Software As A Service And Cloud Computing

The Distinction Between Software As A Service And Cloud Computing

Software as a service and cloud computing are two terms which are quite becoming popular in the world of computing. These two concepts have a positive outcome in the industry by making use of the internet to beat the conventional computing strategies. Although both concepts have similarities, they offer different services.

Software as a service applications have no huge upfront costs and even do not require upkeep and maintenance. They are often offered for lease to business owners and are accessed remotely through web browsers connected to the internet. Business owners save money because they only pay for software they need and do not have to worry about managing renewal fees, patches, and updates which are often identified with onsite applications.

Cloud computing also leases computer technology through the internet. It allows business owners to rent hardware, software, and more infrastructures which the business needs in order to accomplish its computing tasks. Through cloud computing, costly programming and technology demands are outsourced thereby allowing the entity’s employees to have access to computer resources via web browsers. Users need not have thorough knowledge of the hardware and software needed to support the web browser.

Cloud computing and software as a service have almost the same concept. A business owner can lease the services from a third party instead of spending a lot of money on upfront costs commonly associated with onsite infrastructure or software. A business owner who can’t afford expensive on-premise applications and infrastructure can take advantage of software as a service and cloud computing. Both software as a service and cloud computing are even more efficient and manageable than their traditional counterparts.

Software as a service and cloud computing are not one and the same. They vary in their scope. Cloud computing has a wider scope than software as a service. Although useful and innovative, software as a service leases computing applications only. A business owner who takes advantage of software as a service still needs computing resources for business computing to be effective and efficient

Cloud computing, on the other hand, leases software, infrastructure, and hardware. The whole leasing process offered by cloud computing to business owners can totally overhaul the whole accounting department. It can change the way the accounting process is undertaken. With cloud computing, less personnel and resources are needed for maintenance and development. This clearly differentiate software as a service from cloud computing.

Software as a service only provides access to specific applications in order to make the accounting process easier and more efficient but the entity still has the responsibility of storing data, and hiring and training employees. For cloud computing, the whole accounting process is simplified further by outsourcing not only the accounting software but storage space as well. Because storage space is also outsourced, there may no longer be a need to hire more experienced employees because cloud computing makes it possible for users who have no knowledge of the applications to access the software through web browsers.

Cloud computing and software as a service may essentially be the same concept with the same goal of improving and enhancing computing capabilities of business entities, cloud computing has a more dramatic impact to all businesses.

By Florence de Borja

CloudTweaks Comics
New Report Finds 1 Out Of 3 Sites Are Vulnerable To Malware

New Report Finds 1 Out Of 3 Sites Are Vulnerable To Malware

1 Out Of 3 Sites Are Vulnerable To Malware A new report published this morning by Menlo Security has alarmingly suggested that at least a third of the top 1,000,000 websites in the world are at risk of being infected by malware. While it’s worth prefacing the findings with the fact Menlo used Alexa to…

6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact In 2016

6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact In 2016

6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact The technology industry moves at a relentless pace, making it both exhilarating and unforgiving. For those at the forefront of innovation it is an incredibly exciting place to be, but what trends are we likely to see coming to the fore in 2016? Below are six predictions…

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Big Data Continues To Grow Big Data continues to be a much discussed topic of interest and for good reason.  According to a recent report from International Data Corporation (IDC), “worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics will grow from nearly $122 billion in 2015 to more than $187 billion in 2019, an increase…

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security Security is one of those IT concerns that aren’t problematic until disaster strikes. It might be tomorrow, it could be next week or next year. The fact is that poor security leaves businesses wide open for data loss and theft. News outlets just skim the surface, but hackers cost business up…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

Is The Fintech Industry The Next Tech Bubble?

Is The Fintech Industry The Next Tech Bubble?

The Fintech Industry Banks offered a wide variety of services such as payments, money transfers, wealth management, selling insurance, etc. over the years. While banks have expanded the number of services they offer, their core still remains credit and interest. Many experts believe that since banks offered such a wide multitude of services, they have…

The Future Of Work: What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us To Do Better

The Future Of Work: What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us To Do Better

What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us to Do Better The cloud has made our working lives easier, with everything from virtually unlimited email storage to access-from-anywhere enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. It’s no wonder the 2013 cloud computing research IDG survey revealed at least 84 percent of the companies surveyed run at least one cloud-based application.…

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Cloud Infographic – Guide To Small Business Cloud Computing

Small Business Cloud Computing Trepidation is inherently attached to anything that involves change and especially if it involves new technologies. SMBs are incredibly vulnerable to this fear and rightfully so. The wrong security breach can incapacitate a small startup for good whereas larger enterprises can reboot their operations due to the financial stability of shareholders. Gordon Tan contributed an…

Cloud Computing and Finland Green Technology

Cloud Computing and Finland Green Technology

Green Technology Finland Last week we touched upon how a project in Finland had blended two of the world’s most important industries, cloud computing and green technology, to produce a data centre that used nearby sea water to both cool their servers and heat local homes.  Despite such positive environmental projects, there is little doubt that…

Digital Marketing Driven by Cloud, Big Data and IoT

Digital Marketing Driven by Cloud, Big Data and IoT

Digital Marketing Successful digital marketing campaigns are being driven largely by trending technologies, specifically the Internet of Things (IoT), Big Data, and The Cloud. These may be used for a huge number of marketing applications, from optimizing the performance of sports teams to improving science and research, even helping to aid law enforcement. Amazon Web…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

ERP Deployment You know how ERP deployment can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and more popular, it is worth…