Category Archives: Security

Cloud Startup: Aryaka

Cloud Startup: Aryaka

Cloud Startup: Aryaka

Aryaka: Attestation to Pure WAN Connectivity with Optimal Bandwidth Use

Aryaka-logo

Among the recent companies that have proved a blessing to cloud computing, perhaps none has done more, in a world where network is the lifeline, than Aryaka. This cloud startup whose base is California began in 2008 but has since earned wide recognition for its Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage that allows users to access connectivity that rivals that of the Local Area Network (LAN). Perhaps these attributes, alongside the fact that the firm is one of the initial platforms to provide this kind of technology around the globe, are what have earned the company recognition from, among others, GigaOM. The following are the technical features of this product depicting both the beneficial and functional specifications.

The Way Aryaka’s WAN Operates

To understand the technical capabilities of this startup, one must separate three major ingredients of a network into context.

Those of Aryaka include:

Points of Presence (POP): Instead of relying on expensive, hardware-dependant LANs, the cloud startup instead goes for POPs. These are private stations, all over the planet, that are in a square mileage proximate to the end users. It acts as the reference point and provides the same work, though with better redundancy, as a private cloud communications infrastructure or a local network provider.

WAN: The wide area that this company covers is global, national or local. Because the infrastructure is courtesy of Aryaka, the clients need not to install any routing devices or rely on unreliable network connection from a telecommunications provider. Secondly, the startup offers remote management of the systems in place to ensure the right redundancy that can make the network to operate in a double blind manner.

Bandwidth: When operating on a bandwidth, it is essential to have performance that does not cower down from redundancy ramifications due to various issues like network congestion when many clients are relying on one service. This cloud startup offers a worthy alternative, going by the technical name of Advanced Redundancy Removal (AAR), where the technological tools compress memory and duplicate data. The upshot of this is the fact that bandwidth usage goes down to a level of 98 percent. This means that users can finally avail cloud-like benefits where they can scale their bandwidth, due to its economy of up to 20 to 50 times more than recently. This is where the secret of accessing a Local Area Network effect in WAN comes in.

The Possible Benefits of the Technology

service-WAN

Proponents of Aryaka’s offering are gainsaying the demerits of the traditional network that can be either private, public cloud or LAN, delineating their respective high redundancy, unreliability due to congestion and hardware expenditure. In this particular alternative, however, it has become apparent that one reduces capital expenditure on the equipment department. Secondly, there is no need to conduct IT training for the staff. This is because both the management duties and hardware systems emanate from the startup.

Pricing

There are no concrete details about the pricing criteria of Aryaka’s product, primarily because network coverage is both data and equipment-based. However, one can draw the conclusion that the costs are quite manageable because of the aforementioned use of bandwidth-optimization technology. This means that the end-user can only amass high costs when scaling the bandwidth. Still, the significance of the cost would not hit the bull’s eye until one does scale to more than 50 times the current usage. This applies to large organizations with high network demands.

Recognition

Aryaka received critical acclaim from technology analysis firms. In 2011, Gartner accorded the firm with the term, Cool Vendor, for its Enterprise Communications offerings. The latter applies to the collaborative framework that the startup provides for closely-packed businesses that can tap from a local POP, thus reducing separate installation costs. CIO.com also listed the firm among the Top 10 ranking companies that will have an impact in the coming days of the cloud.

Therefore, Aryaka passes the test, flawlessly, as one of the most important cloud startups, not only in the technology capital of the world, the United States, but the entire globe. The standing out feature is its POP configuration in an otherwise traditionally lax, extensive network environment, WAN. Furthermore, the management comes from various top-notch network management companies, which reinforces the fact of the firm’s greatness and accountability. Apparently, the team has managed to raise substantial funds for the company. This is why their brainchild deserves a mention among the top North America cloud startups.

By John Omwamba

Preventing Disastrous Events Through The Power of Anomaly Detection In Machine Data

Preventing Disastrous Events Through The Power of Anomaly Detection In Machine Data

Preventing Disastrous Events Through the Power of Anomaly Detection in Machine Data

In August, a single server failed and the NASDAQ went down for three hours. In January, GlobalPayments reported that a hack compromising millions of credit card accounts cost them $93 million to recover from. In both cases, nobody took action until the damage was done because quite simply, nobody could. IT planners could not proactively head off the failure or breach because they had no suspicious behavior or early warning system to alert them that something was going amiss; all they had were mountains of event logs that needed to be pored through after the damage was already said and done.

nasdaq2

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

To prevent such catastrophes in the future, three things are required:

  • A machine learning engine that can analyze and learn from data – as well as human interaction and feedback – in order to get smarter over time;
  • Big Data technologies;
  • And of course, a cloud platform for ease of management.

Machine logs are the output of every application, website, server and supporting IT infrastructure component in the enterprise. This means that IT teams are inundated by massive amounts of machine log data. Digging through all of this data for something meaningful is not only unwieldy and unappealing, but also ultimately drives down productivity and increases costs. IT teams need to be able to not only visualize, but also analyze machine data in a way that can provide clear insight into what events in that stream of data are benign and what events are malicious that would require immediate attention. By being able to make sense of machine data from an “event” perspective, IT teams can create optimal functionality around any environment and also bring a true, proactive approach to IT management.

The goal of combining Big Data and a machine learning engine all within a cloud platform is to make events easily known and to procure insight on such events prior to their occurrences, which would result in significantly fewer headaches for IT managers and CIOs. Big Data technologies enable a holistic approach to analysis of data without binding to schemas, volumes or batch analytics. A machine learning engine provides advanced algorithms that learn and analyze from data as well as humans to increase intelligence over time. And lastly, the combination of these components in a cloud-based management platform enables an elastic compute at the massive scale that’s needed to analyze this amount of data in real-time across all vectors. By having this capability, IT managers can then create playbooks and remediation steps to prevent certain events and anticipate the impact to their organization.

Event detection can play a big role in optimizing system availability and performance; when a process, application or infrastructure component fails or slows down, it’s typically presaged by multiple events occurring simultaneously or in rapid succession. Out-of-the-ordinary or “anomaly” event detection can decipher how this series of events and their patterns vary from the norm, and what the variation means to the business. The power behind anomaly detection is neither a single technology nor a single technique. It’s typically a set of algorithms that work synergistically, leveraging machine learning techniques as well as mathematical and statistical analysis.

The benefits are clear, but there are many solutions out there that claim to do this, but do not leverage the three critical components for successful anomaly detection: machine learning engine, big data analytics and a cloud management platform. Without these three things working harmoniously together, it is that much more difficult to proactively manage the IT environment. Coming full circle, disastrous events such as the NASDAQ going down or a company losing millions of dollars could have been prevented through the power of machine data and anomaly detection.

sanjayBy Sanjay Sarathy, CMO of Sumo Logic

Sanjay joins Sumo Logic with over seventeen years of marketing, business development and community building experience in both SaaS and enterprise software environments. Prior to Sumo Logic, he was at Vindicia, a SaaS company that provides online billing and marketing solutions for for companies selling digital content and services. He also spent time at Above All Software, Qualys, Sun Microsystems and NetDynamics. Sanjay has a BA in Quantitative Economics from Stanford University and a MBA from the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley.

Cloud Infographic: Big Data Opportunities

Cloud Infographic: Big Data Opportunities

Cloud Infographic: Big Data Opportunities

Big Data has seen its fair share of coverage over the past couple of years. Much of the focus has been placed on the Analytics and Monitoring of Big Data. This will be a much discussed area  and expect a large number of startups to put forward new and innovative services to help analyze, locate and extract critical data from their findings.

Here is an infographic courtesy of Elexio which provides some really nice insight into the growing opportunities of Big Data.

big-data-infographic-cloud

Infographic Source: Elexio

Cloud-Enabling Technologies Market To Reach $22.6 Billion In 2016

Cloud-Enabling Technologies Market to Reach $22.6 Billion in 2016, According to New 451 Research Study

End Users Remain Focused on Internal Cloud Initiatives

NEW YORK, Sept. 20, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Market Monitor, a service of 451 Research, projects that the Cloud-Enabling Technologies market revenue will increase at a 21% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) to reach $22.6 billion in 2016.

The recently published Market Monitor Cloud-Enabling Technologies overview report defines Cloud-Enabling Technologies as technologies that are installed, delivered and consumed on-premises. The report examines 143 vendors, segmented into three primary categories – virtualization, security, and automation and management. Cloud-Enabling Technologies, by definition, are not hosted by third parties. A report overview can be viewed here.

Full report highlights include:

  • Virtualization – the foundation of cloud computing – accounts for the majority of total market revenue, with a 66% share. But, as the most mature market segment, it also has the lowest CAGR through 2016 (16%).
  • Automation and Management, a broad category that includes incumbent technologies and cloud platforms, will continue to grow at a healthy 28% CAGR as users move up the stack from first-tier virtualization implementation.
  • At the top of the stack is security, with no single vendor dominating. This sector has the highest CAGR through 2016 at 29%.
  • Since September 2012, there have been 12 significant acquisitions in the CET space. Going forward, we expect to see more of the same as firms look to either bulk up their cloud offerings or make an initial ‘roll of the dice’ in the cloud market.
  • Revenue generated by public firms accounted for 87% of the total, with private firms accounting for the remaining 13%.
  • Public vendors accounted for 21% of the total companies in the CET space, with private vendors accounting for 79%.
  • A smaller percentage of companies are generating less than $5m in revenue than the year before: nearly half of the vendors in 2012 generated less than $5m in revenue (44%), compared with 58% in 2011. Roughly one-third of vendors fall into the midmarket range (defined as $5m-$25m), up from 27% in the midmarket the year before. Only six vendors have revenue (deriving strictly from CET) over $500m.

The drivers of growth are twofold,” said Victoria Simons, Research Analyst, 451 Research. “Initial adoption of the cloud is driven by the need for cost reduction and more efficient computing options. As the infrastructure is virtualized, customers then need tools to manage, control and secure their IT environments to fully realize the benefits of virtual/cloud environments. We see the cloud-enabling technologies market growing strongly as large enterprises and SMBs continue along the path of flexible computing.”

Leveraging 451 Research’s deep insight into established cloud vendors and startups, Market Monitor employs a pure bottom-up approach, with active participation from sector analysts. The resulting forecast incorporates the unique traits, strengths and weaknesses of each market participant, and when used with in-depth qualitative research from 451 Research, Market Monitor provides a holistic view of the cloud computing marketplace. This bottom-up analysis methodology enables 451 Research to provide granular detail at the vendor and individual service level.

About Market Monitor: Cloud-Enabling Technologies

Market Monitor: Cloud-Enabling Technologies is a quantitative research service that tracks and forecasts the size and growth of the rapidly evolving server virtualization and on-premises cloud-enabling technologies marketplace. In addition to forecasting revenues over a five-year horizon, the service breaks out revenue by geographic region, company size and industry verticals. The service tracks revenue generated by server virtualization, automation and management, cloud security, and cloud platforms. The Market Monitor analyst team uses a bottom-up approach to track and project revenue for vendors operating in this marketplace.

About 451 Research 

451 Research, a division of The 451 Group, is focused on the business of enterprise IT innovation. The company’s analysts provide critical and timely insight into the competitive dynamics of innovation in emerging technology segments. Business value is delivered via daily concise and insightful published research, periodic deeper-dive reports, data tools, market-sizing research, analyst advisory, and conferences and events. Clients of the company – at vendor, investor, service-provider and end-user organizations – rely on 451 Research’s insight to support both strategic and tactical decision-making. 451 Research is headquartered in New York, with offices in key locations, including San Francisco, Washington DC, London, Boston, Seattleand Denver.

SOURCE 451 Research

The Tolly Group Report: How Dimension Data Beat Out Some Big Players

The Tolly Group Report: How Dimension Data Beat Out Some Big Players

The Tolly Group Report: How Dimension Data beat out some big players to help keep your data up to date

(Update Revision: Initial Post, August 30th)

The next time you check out busy commercial websites – those, for example, that talk about products, sell them, ship them and generate buzz and conversation about them, spare a thought for all of the billions of bits of data running around behind the scenes to make these sites’ videos, promos and “buy now” catalogues work smoothly, reliably and securely. Much of the infrastructure behind sites like these comes to you courtesy of a few organizations that have recognized the need for a more cohesive approach to collection and redistribution of data on the cloud, through the use of a “network-centric,” rather than “best effort” structure.

The technological wizardry behind complex websites tends to go unnoticed by the average consumer; at least until something goes wrong, at which point the great “fail whale” emerges to spoil the fun.

The cloud is growing by leaps and bounds, but a great deal of the infrastructure is built on existing components. It can often be a hodgepodge of servers and programs built using elements that were not always designed to scale up to the degree and with the versatility currently required. “Cloud” may exist at the top of every CIO’s agenda, but, according to Gartner Research, it still forms a relatively small portion of the 3.7 trillion dollar IT industry.

This means we are still in the early days of the cloud as a primary technology. It has a way to go to emerge as a platform for more than just testing and development, and to become the place for hosting mission-critical data applications.

Enter the Tolly Group.

The Tolly Group was founded in 1989 to provide hands-on evaluation and certification of IT products and services. In a recent study, conducted in May 2013, Tolly researchers tested the cloud performance of some major providers: Amazon, Rackspace, IBM and Dimension Data in all four areas: CPU, RAM, storage and network performance. Their findings exposed the price and performance limitations of today’s “commodity” or “best effort” clouds that rely on traditional, server-centric architectures. The report found that of these four big players, the network-centric approach used by Dimension Data’s enterprise-class cloud helped lower cost and risk, and accelerate migration of mission-critical apps to the cloud.

keao-caindec

Keao Caindec, CMO of the Cloud Solutions Business for Dimension Data was obviously pleased with the results of Tolly’s stringent testing, but not surprised. He points out that the report tells an interesting story. He says it shows how not all clouds are created equal, and that there is a big difference between providers. This, he believes, will force end-users to look more critically at underlying performance of any provider they choose to do business with.

As an example, Caindec points out that when someone goes and buys a router switch or server, these pieces come with specs.  But such specs don’t exist broadly in the cloud world. In many cases, he says, clouds were developed as low cost compute platforms – a best effort. Now, however, this is not enough. A provider must demonstrate a great deal more reliability in terms of speed, security and scalability – for example, designing an application to scale either up or out. When scaling up, a provider must be able to add more power to the cloud server. When scaling out, it must be able to easily add more instances. He points out that clients in a growth phase must be careful about scaling up, since such expansions may not lead to the desired level increased performance.

Caindec points to some specific types of work that Dimension Data does with its high-profile clients: “We help them with their websites by leveraging the public cloud for testing and development. This allows granular configuration of the server, which means that each server is configured with as much storage/power as is needed.” He points out that customers often need to make sure they are not buying too much of one resource. For example a database app needs lots of memory, maybe 32 Gig of memory on a server, but not necessarily a lot of computing power. Dimension Data, he says, takes care to help clients to configure exact amount of resources necessary, allowing them to save money by not over-provisioning.

Caindec finds the Tolly study to be eye-opening primarily because it begs the question: are low cost clouds really low cost? “If the model is more best effort and because of that you have to run more servers, are you being as economical as you could?” For the most part, he points out, the costs of cloud providers are similar. But performance levels vary much more dramatically. In other words, “You may not be saving all the money you could. You may find a lower cost per hour, but in a larger environment, especially when running thousands of servers, this does not become economic.”

Caindec points out that at this point in IT history there is still a great deal that is not well understood. There are not a lot of statistics. He hopes that IT managers and CTOs everywhere will be able to obtain more granular insights from the full Tolly Report. Insights such as the fact that more memory does not mean applications will run better or provide better throughput. “If you scale up the size of the server, the server runs faster, but requires higher throughput to reach other servers.” He says companies must be careful to benchmark their own applications. It is not necessary to hire a high-profile testing firm like Tolly to do this, however; testing tools are available publicly, but he strongly advises more testing and awareness as standard practice.

By Steve Prentice

Breaking The Mold: Why IT Veterans Can’t Resist The Cloud

Breaking The Mold: Why IT Veterans Can’t Resist The Cloud

Why IT Veterans Can’t Resist the Cloud

Like it or not, Cloud Computing has transformed the way we communicate; from online storage to social networking, server virtualization truly pushes the boundaries of what is possible in a digitized world. Yet it was only a few years ago that the cloud was merely being used as a buzzword to describe specific web services hosted on shared web space. So what has changed? Cost, for one thing and availability for another; IT decision makers who once criticized the cloud may soon have to embrace it.

The Economics of Cloud Computing

A recent report in the economist wrote that small banking firms were expected to spend nearly $180 million on cloud services to better serve their clients. That means a global market for cloud services and availability is growing rapidly to support consumer demands, as well as expectations. Small banking firms can now host PDFs, email and other important financial documents on cloud storage platforms without having to invest in costly infrastructure. From a supply and demand standpoint the price of cloud based services can only get cheaper.

Lower costs reduce IT complexity and enable organizations to scale infrastructures depending on needs. That aforementioned small banking firm need not employ an entire IT department to maintain a virtual environment. Staff members may now work remotely allowing them to make the most of company resources – favorable attributes made possible by cloud-based resources. Even still, glitter isn’t gold amongst IT veterans who cannot make it past the shortcomings of the cloud. Gartner lists 3 key challenges for cloud computing: Security, governance and privacy for starters.

Security Risks

The threat of downtime is imminent to any organization reliant on cloud-based resources, particularly because cyber-attacks can render this virtual environment unresponsive. To most skeptics, security has become the main concern. At one end, you have the physical layer – a group of servers collocated within a secure location each partitioned to handle a certain amount of traffic, both upstream and downstream. The virtual end routes traffic to and from physical servers accordingly, but the more convoluted the signal path becomes (in theory) the more room for error exists.

Cloud environments are increasingly susceptible to DDoS (distributed denial of service attacks) because security protocols are easily bypassed by attackers at specific points of entry. Some organizations have gone as far as to implement a security appliance within the physical layer of a data center. Others simply rely on cloud security software, of which, can still be foiled by malicious attack. But aside from these obvious security pitfalls (that often beget other technologies), CTO’s still cannot and must not deny that the cloud computing business model works – and to an extent, works rather well considering its shortcomings. In fact, cloud based services are actually driving consumer trends faster than organizations can keep up.

Two Steps Forward One Step Back

Cloud’s popularity often outgrows infrastructure simply because it is cheap and everyone wants to offer a service to one-up the competition. What happens then is that companies partition more storage – enough to keep up with demand for the next few years, only to find that they’ve exceeded capacity in just a few short months. In that regard, cloud becomes a victim of its own success forcing IT decision makers back to the drawing board. Skeptics will still argue you cannot make a cloud environment secure as in a dedicated environment. Yet at this point there is no turning back. Clients, shareholders and customers expect to have specific IT resources at their fingertips, and as everyone runs to cloud based computing platforms, traditionalists must adapt or risk falling behind the times.

From an economic standpoint, cloud will continue to level the playing field for all types of IT vendors so long as organizations realize what their true cost of ownership is. If they aren’t utilizing their infrastructure efficiently they may be losing money by not outsourcing to a cloud provider such as, for example, AWS amazon web services. Whichever solution decision makers decide to stick with, one thing’s for certain; cloud product offerings will improve and costs will come down.

This is a post written by on behalf of Colocation America, a leading provider of data center services in Los Angeles.

Securing Cloud CRM For Better Customer Adoption

Securing Cloud CRM For Better Customer Adoption

Securing Cloud CRM For Better Customer Adoption

Cloud Computing and CRM

Cloud computing is the techno-business strategy of web-based access of diverse set of applications from any device and less workload on the Customer Service Representative’s (CSR) device as the software and data gets stored elsewhere. Any kind of application can be accessed through cloud, right from trivial word processing software to complex analytical engine for an enterprise. The primary benefit of cloud platform is that it allows an organization to focus only on its core competency as the complexity and overhead of managing IT applications and infrastructure will be addressed by the cloud platform vendor.  Cloud based CRM enables organizations to manage customer experience via cloud in a flexible and cost effective manner. Salesforce.com, Microsoft and Oracle are major cloud based CRM vendors.

Benefits of Cloud CRM

There are a number of benefits of a cloud based CRM than an on-premise model, especially in terms of mobility, flexibility and cost.

  • The CSRs can access the application from any device like desktops, laptops, tablets, Smart phones and PDAs via internet. So the customers are more quickly served.
  • Cloud based CRM provides more flexibility as the upgrades and scaling-up of software are managed by the vendors.
  • Typically cloud deployments have shorter implementation cycle and adhere to pay-per-use/subscription model and hence manageable cost.

Cloud Security and Availability:

Though many small and medium sized companies have started to adopt cloud based CRM strategy to benefit from low cost upfront and quicker implementation cycle, many large companies are still skeptical about migration to cloud due to storing sensitive data like customer details and commercial transactions in a remote database. Security concerns and fear of sudden outage are the major deterrents for cloud adoption, especially in CRM space where customer experience and trust are of prime importance. Some also ponder about migrating to private or hybrid cloud; however these alternatives are complex, tedious and costly when compared to public cloud. Consequently, the migration to cloud based CRM platform has been slow compared to the hype and expectation. According to an expert from Gartner  “Despite the hype surrounding migration to the cloud, big differences in movement rates continue, depending on organisations’ size, industry, geography and specific requirements.

The thought of storing strategic documents, customer data and commercials elsewhere cause cold feet for many CXOs while transforming to cloud. Furthermore, an outage could make data unavailable at the time of serving a customer request, performing transactions and also decision making.

outages-cloud

The following are the major implications for an organization in case of security breach or outage.

  • Access of sensitive data by unauthorized personnel
  • Bad customer experience and dissatisfied customer
  • Loss of reputation of the company and legal issues
  • Potential financial losses and losing ground to competition
  • Disruption in business operations and customer service

It is apparent that, securing the cloud platform is fundamental to eliminate the inherent risks and gain from the investments made. Through various hybrid cloud architectures are available, they tend to become costly and complex, when compared with simple cloud implementation. Understanding the process of providing a secured platform and greater collaboration within cloud vendor and organizations is the key to create a successful cloud based CRM and win customers’ trust.

Below are the possible avenues through which security can be enhanced for a Cloud based CRM system.

Monitor Vulnerability:

The key to a successful security strategy is to rigorously monitor all events and activities in the cloud ecosystem. Added, an enterprise can assign an internal security team to perform extensive penetration testing to identify vulnerabilities, and share the “findings” with the cloud vendor. The effectiveness of the monitoring strategy should be revisited frequently both by the cloud vendor and implementing enterprises.

Deceive by Traps:

The CRM vendors can create certain “security traps” within their datacenters and cloud ecosystem. These purpose-built traps will certainly lure the probable hackers during their preliminary attempts. When anticipated security incidents happen, it could trigger an alarm for the IT security personnel to look into. Such alarms can alert both in-house security team at the enterprise and also the security team of the vendors. Later, appropriate defensive methods can be initiated to prevent the breach further and to identify the location the hackers as well.

Maintain Transparency:

The vendors can share all the relevant logs (security, audit, etc.) with the organizations on a regular basis. Also, they can educate the enterprises regarding new vulnerabilities identified and precautionary measures. Transparent and consistent approach could ensure increase in confidence and trust, especially from skeptical organizations.

Know Your Customers

The cloud CRM vendors can provide a “profiling feature” to enterprises to secure the “customer portal” used by end-users. The enterprises use the feature to perform appropriate profiling of their customers with regards to security. For example, request for references and recognized identity proofs can act as a layer of security. This will certainly deter unscrupulous elements from gaining access to CRM portal by faking as customers.

Know Your Employees:

It is an accepted fact that even employees inherent to an organization can perform security breach. The cloud vendors can provide a “predictive reporting” feature by consistently monitoring the activities of all employees. The reporting feature should maintain the activity history of an employee and automatically trigger a report to the in-house security team on any change in employee behavior with the system. For example, login failure, trying access to restricted site, etc. This will enable the security team to predict probable unwanted behavior from employees.

In summary, the above mentioned approaches will definitely help enterprises achieve greater security. Focus on each step at a time and greater collaboration with cloud vendors, will help organizations achieve higher levels of security, enhanced customer experience through better reliability and maximize benefits from cloud based CRM systems.

By Padmanabha Sivanandan,

Padmanabha is a CRM Consultant with Infosys Limited in India. He can be reached at Padmanabha_s01@infosys.com

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How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more…

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Hyperconverged Infrastructure In this article, we’ll explore three challenges that are associated with network deployment in a hyperconverged private cloud environment, and then we’ll consider several methods to overcome those challenges. The Main Challenge: Bring Your Own (Physical) Network Some of the main challenges of deploying a hyperconverged infrastructure software solution in a data center are the diverse physical…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Cloud Beacons Flying High When Apple debuted cloud beacons in 2013, analysts predicted 250 million devices capable of serving as iBeacons would be found in the wild within weeks. A few months later, estimates put the figure at just 64,000, with 15 percent confined to Apple stores. Beacons didn’t proliferate as expected, but a few…