Category Archives: Security

Delivering Data Security In The Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud

Delivering Data Security In The Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud

Delivering Data Security in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud

In the past few years, we’ve seen a drastic change in the types of security threats organizations are encountering – and where they’re confronting them. For years, hackers were motivated by a desire for fame, recognition or support for a specific cause, but now it’s turned into a mainstream criminal or government activity.

Today, that has changed. Organized groups understand that data is the new currency and they’re looking for specific data sets that can lead to financial gain or national advantage. Major financial and business institutions are direct targets for government entities on opposite ends of ideological spectrum’s. Manufacturers have become prime targets, as their critical “know-how” – formulas, product plans and other information – are sought. Even online gaming sites have become targets, with criminal organizations targeting them to gain credential sets that can be used to compromise accounts with financial organizations, or to gain access to other targets. It’s a different world from just a few years ago – and sensitive data is the target.

While motivations for attacks have changed, so have the information technology landscape and the attack surface. It is becoming standard practice for organizations to embrace public and private cloud services and environments. But this practice is also leading to what can only be described in some cases as unnecessary risk in the area of cloud security.

Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are on every security organization’s mind – and a very likely threat where victimization of ‘high value’ data is common. Victims of these attacks don’t even know that their perimeter security has been penetrated for a startlingly high average of 243 days. These organizations typically all have up-to-date antivirus software – and 100% of breaches involved stolen credentials (Mandiant 2013 Threat Landscape). In this environment, organizations are understandably reluctant to add another potential set of risks by putting critical infrastructure outside their perimeter – in an AWS cloud environment.

In addition to APTs, another threat vector organizations are watching closely is that of the privileged user – either system administrators who can turn rogue or an external threat using stolen credentials. As an example, the risks that can result from privileged users have recently been highlighted by the disclosures of Edward Snowden – as a system administrator he had access to data that should never have been available to someone with his role within the organization. Cloud service providers, such as AWS, result in additional privileged user roles (both within the enterprise, and at the cloud provider), so the focus must be on putting in place controls to prevent these insider threats. By taking a data-centric security strategy, insiders are able to do their jobs without any access to the sensitive data itself. With the risks posed by that of the privileged user, organizations have to wonder – “If I place my data within AWS, won’t even more privileged users (cloud administrators) have access to my data?

AWS snapshots create yet another risk vector. Privileged users that have access to snapshots of EC2 instances, also have access to the sensitive information that they contain. As with other privileged accounts, if they are compromised, or used by a malicious insider, data snapshots create another possible exposure point. The result of this set of risks is that organizations need fundamental questions answered about securing their data when deploying to AWS.

Is it possible to meet compliance requirements when using AWS? How can my organization maintain control of our sensitive data? Will use of AWS increase exposure to the possibility of a data breach? Even within my enterprise, privileged user control can be a problem – Will using AWS increase this risk? Will using AWS increase my APT threat profile?

In order to appropriately answer these questions, and solve the issues they imply, organizations must take a data-centric security strategy for protecting the information accessible through AWS instances. A data-centric solution places the security controls and protections directly around the target – the data. Data-centric solutions protect information with access controls and an enforcement layer – usually encrypting critical data at rest, but only decrypting for authorized users and processes. By protecting the data at the source, you’re essentially putting up a “data firewall” that will ensure criminals don’t walk away with anything of value. Protections must reside at the file system level accessed by your EC2 instances, both local and EBS based. And the solution should also protect data in snapshots, backup location repositories and disaster recovery (DR) locations as well – wherever critical data lives within your AWS implementation.

c-j-radford

By C.J Radford,

C.J. Radford joined Vormetric in March 2013 as vice president of cloud, a newly created leadership position that is tasked with leading the company’s cloud strategy and growth via strategic partnerships with cloud service providers (CSPs). He came to Vormetric from Symantec Corporation, where he spent more than five years driving business development and new strategic growth initiatives within the rapidly evolving CSP market. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Oregon and an MBA from the University of California, Berkeley.

Storage Stalemate: Why Current Trends Are Breaking Old Storage Solutions

Storage Stalemate: Why Current Trends Are Breaking Old Storage Solutions

Storage Stalemate: Why Current Trends Are Breaking Old Storage Solutions

While new technologies are being adapted at lightening pace across all kinds of industries, one thing has not changed: IT departments are expected to use antiquated storage solutions to meet their new storage needs. Just as we wouldn’t expect anyone to use a twenty-year old phone to communicate effectively, it is unreasonable to expect IT professionals to use tape and proprietary storage arrays to store massive amounts of data, especially in this era of powerful cloud computing.

The simple fact is that it is impossible to manage today’s storage needs with yesterday’s storage solutions because of key trends that are disrupting the storage industry as we have known it thus far.

These key trends include:

Big Data: In our Cloud-based world, data keeps getting bigger and bigger. Gartner defines “big data” according to the “three Vs”: increasing volume, velocity (speed of data in and out) and variety (range of data types and sources). Indeed, sources say that every day we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data—which is so much that 90 percent of the data in the world has been created in the last two years alone.

Traditional approaches to enterprise storage such as SAN and NAS can be costly, especially for data that needs to be retained but is seldom accessed, while tape-based storage increasingly does not meet enterprise requirements in an ‘on-demand’ era. However, object-based storage systems are emerging as a new category in enterprise storage, allowing organizations to store vast quantities of data ‘online,’ and at a price point that won’t break the bank.

Cloud: With the popularity of cloud computing, IT organizations are now warming up to the idea of deploying private cloud storage in the enterprise. They are expecting the same benefits they derive from cloud computing in general, namely elasticity, simplified management, fault-tolerance & commodity hardware, to be available with cloud storage. Unfortunately, traditional storage architectures can’t deliver that promise for cloud storage.

Mobile: The simple fact is, just as workers are more mobile than ever before, so is data. There are two types of companies today: ones that are “born in the cloud” and thus already need a virtualized approach to storage, and companies that are now trying to move to the cloud. The cloud has in essence become the true receptacle for data. The only way to truly tame the data that is flowing to and from so many sources is to be able to tap into the Cloud itself, to build reliable, scalable and affordable cloud storage solutions. Storage solutions based on physical locations simply no longer work. Storage solutions need to be software-based and flexible to meet IT departments’ specific needs—and many locations.

Storage-as-a-Utility: The truth is that the technology exists to help IT professionals finally break free from the shackles of storage. The trick is that IT pros need to believe that storage-as-a-utility can be a reality because, frankly, they have no other choice. IT budgets simply will not allow massive investments in storage.

The good news is that cloud storage solutions can now help organizations address their big data storage challenges by providing software to build private or public clouds using commodity servers. These new methods require minimum IT involvement, dramatically reduce the costs of cloud deployment and management—and, as a result, are helping make “Storage-As-A-Utility” a reality.

So, while big data continues to explode, and old storage systems continue to break, there are simple solutions on the market to redefine storage as we have known it to date. And these solutions won’t drain budget—in fact, a well-planned Cloud storage solution based on software and commodity hardware could actually free IT budget up for other projects, finally making the dream of IT pros to be able to use their funds for ground-breaking projects rather than grueling maintenance a reality.

jay-desaiBy Jay Desai

A storage industry veteran, Jay Desai is current Vice President of Product Management, a leading cloud storage software company. Visit www.cloudian.com to learn more or get started with Cloudian today.

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

You might have seen many articles on private cloud or a public cloud, but a cloud strategy is not limited to this only. The answer may be in an intermediate range, the Hybrid Cloud.

First of all, let’s see how these services are deployed.hybrid-cloud

Private cloud – internalized or externalized: A private cloud is a cloud infrastructure operated directly and exclusively by an organization. The best known example is that of a cloud that runs on an internal IT company. Obviously, this infrastructure can be internalized. Under these conditions it is operated by the IT teams. Or it can be outsourced to a hosting company, specialized in cloud services.

In both cases, the infrastructure can be physically being in the company (on-premise), or outside the premise, and then we say that it is hosed. But in both cases, only the organization operates and supports the load.

A private cloud is primarily a natural movement of the company. The infrastructure that has funded by deployed, maintained, energized, powered, and updated applications on the regular basis usually provide the first support for cloud projects consumed by the enterprise and its ecosystem.

Services deployed in the cloud are therefore based on an infrastructure in internal control. And it is reassuring for CIOs shows the use of equipment purchased in time. It can better justify spending equipment and keep their hands on the edge of the information system and all that is within the boundary.

In many companies, business applications cannot be conceived outside of the physical infrastructure of the company. In some cases, this is a safety issue. For example, Bank data, Health Care, Defense, etc. In other cases, it is a question of attitude.

In all cases, the private cloud is an economical choice. The information from here in the case of system investments and the company fully supports funding.

Public cloud infrastructure:

A public cloud is based on open and shared public infrastructure. All users connect to the same infrastructure to access the same services that are rented. All users coexist within this infrastructure: developers to ensure data isolation of each other. If there are several levels of membership to a public cloud, we consider two:

Public infrastructure: the company occupies and rent a place in the infrastructure of the hosting company for the service in the cloud. It makes available virtualized resources – servers with their operating systems, storage with databases, and network to communicate – it consumes resources according to the needs. These resources are virtualized, that is to say are running in virtual machines (VM). Hundreds of virtual machines running on a physical machine, so many companies or individuals may be present on the same machine, called open architecture. The advantage for the company is that by sharing the same infrastructure with other companies cut the cost. And management, such as maintenance of the infrastructure is provided by the hosting company.

The multitenant: users participate and praise the same service, whatever the resources, infrastructure, management of servers, and storage, which is an application that is available with the storage of data. The user pays for a service, often with a clause volume changed the price down as well as up depending on the number of users and the use of storage space or data exchanged and processed. The service will be displayed on the workstation, usually in a browser internet. Some of these services ‘public cloud’ is already used by many organizations, such as messaging offered by the search engines or e-commerce websites, or CRM solutions – managing the customer relationship, even some payroll system programs.

The advantage for the company is to first be able to have multiple services without having to invest in infrastructure and licenses, and rapidly deployable since it is adequate to connect and declare it to start operations.

Another advantage is that you can always use the latest version of the solution, without the need to provide updates. Deployment is flexible and related to the only operating expenses. Finally, the solution to the public cloud is also interesting; mobility users can have the same tools as they connect.

Hybrid Cloud: the principle of flexibility

We have almost seen every version of cloud displays its advantages and disadvantages. The choice of one or the other is often dictated by necessity or by company policy. For example, the private cloud can keep the control of its information system, while the public cloud offers greater flexibility in the deployment of shared services.

When a company enforces a strict and restrictive discipline, it focuses on the infrastructure it owns, obviously oversized to be able to withstand peak loads, but under its full control. Conversely, it can select more flexibility, but lose that sense of security by using the cloud, sometimes at the risk of getting lost. Cloudiness prevailing on certain clauses of reversibility demonstrated.

However, there is an intermediate position which may enable the company to benefit from the best of both worlds: the hybrid cloud. This is a composition of two clouds, and the company can take advantage of two deployment models of cloud services.

The hybrid cloud considered for its flexibility. Some examples: components and strategic and highly secure applications of information systems can be deployed internally in a private cloud, components and operation applications, accessories, services and architectures for development and testing can appeal to public cloud services.

These may also cover temporary needs or meet the objectives of proximity access, for example, based on hosting company that has a network of data centers in the world, which can improve the availability of service and reduce latency.

Building hybrid cloud architecture can go further with what we call the ‘cloud bursting’. The system displays information using two levels; the average level is the most common since it covers 80 to 90% (or more) of the consumption of material resources, and come to peak loads, in those rare moments the year when excess needs (e.g. Balances and year-end holidays in the trade) cause additional load to which the SI (Sustainable Infrastructure) must meet.

The architecture ‘on premise’ must accept these peaks, so all SI is oversized compared to the real needs of the company means. The ‘cloud bursting’  is to see the peaks of consumption of infrastructure resources in the cloud. ISD (Infrastructure Services Division) can resize and its information as accurately as not invest in ‘capex’ (Capital expenditures) – and private cloud. Its permanent needs a replay in ‘opex’ (operating expense) needs at the margin.

That is why the hybrid cloud architectures should quickly establish itself to companies who are in search of the security of an internalized SI and flexibility of an IaaS in the cloud. The process is even more important that we go through a period of technological revolution, both the evolution of equipment and tools, especially the Virtualization infrastructure, and changes in use, especially consumerization in IT and mobility.

By Paul Lopez,

Paul Lopez, a technology writer and sales & marketing executive at bodHOST.com, a cloud & dedicated server hosting company based in New Jersey.

Public Clouds Have Internal IT Beat For New Projects

Public Clouds Have Internal IT Beat For New Projects

Public Clouds Have Internal IT Beat for New Projects, and It’s Slowly Killing off Enterprise IT

For departments in organizations that need to get an application deployed, the fastest and most effective option is renting IT resources on a public cloud such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), rather than working with the internal IT department. As a result, cloud providers like AWS are slowly killing off enterprise IT, as on-premise IT staff and hardware are needed less and less.

This ease of application deployment on a public cloud comes from the democratization of the application deployment process: Anyone with a credit card and a few hours to watch tutorial videos can make an application available publicly. Moreover, departments often find that public clouds not only offer instant gratification but also rationalize costs with pay-as-you-go billing, remove project startup costs and allow for accelerated deployment schedules.

Internal IT Departments are Slow, Cumbersome and Costly

Internal IT departments are usually built as shared services models. Data center space is rented or constructed, and then, hardware and technical staff are brought on to run the IT department. This department services an entire organization with ticketing systems to fix issues with existing infrastructure and planning processes on new projects that occur only on a quarterly or yearly basis. These processes quickly get bogged down, making reaction times slow from the IT department. Moreover, as new projects involve additional overhead, stakeholders from around the organization must lobby internally, or go through a lengthy approval process to gain access to IT resources. This process is tedious and can be costly. Worst, the lag times from the budgeting and planning process may impact the launch date for a new project.

Public Clouds offer Instant IT Gratification

For project stakeholders that don’t want access to IT resources to slow down their initiatives, public clouds offer a cheap, fast alternative. Anyone with a credit card who follows the instructions can quickly launch a virtual server and deploy an application or begin developing on a public cloud. This is nearly instantaneous compared to the weeks or months needed to with  IT department. Better yet, there’s no approval process and no need to speak with anyone, just an API to hit. Of course, there are security and compliance needs that may not be met by a cloud provider. However, barring those requirements, the public cloud will almost always beat the internal IT department for making available resources for a new project.

Public Clouds Have Better Short-Term Economics

Departments in an organization that contribute budget to their IT departments will see a public cloud as cheaper. For starters, (Source: Wired)  the cloud eliminates the need to rent out more data center space (or build a new one), buy expensive servers, network and storage, and possibly hire in more help before any actual work on the project even begins. Much of this would be footed by the department before a single line of code for an application was written. A developer can instead rent infrastructure on AWS with zero dollars needed up front. Moreover, the pay as you go nature of many cloud billing plans, make clear what was rented and thus make spending more transparent. Not only is it cheaper to start, but trading capex for opex is very attractive for new product or experiments.

Clouds Enable Faster Development and Deployment

Because clouds democratize access to deployment, anyone given access by the project administrator can issue an update at any time. This is different from the usual waits that are needed for a ticket to an IT department to be processed. Moreover, AWS, Heroku, and other IaaS and PaaS vendors have enabled an ever-growing ecosystem of “fill in the blank” as a Service vendors. These solutions are not only plug-and-play, but also, they do not require maintenance and come in all shapes and sizes to uniquely fit the needs of a project. In on-premise enterprise IT, the IT department would need to either purchase an off-the shelf component and integrate it in manually, or home-grow which would add more time and complexity to an IT project.

Clouds are not an IT Elixir, But Make it Easy to Start Projects

While clouds offer faster deployment, rationalize spend, may be cheaper and are universally available for access to IT resources, choosing that infrastructure option is not without some possible setbacks. An application run on a cloud is at the mercy of a third party. If the public cloud goes down or has an issue, so will that application. Further, monitoring and understanding the performance of the cloud and the many services that are used within an application requires specialized skills and tools to ensure that an application is working the way that it should be. Departments deploying an application on a public cloud may not at first realize that when they choose to go outside of their internal IT departments, they are going to have to become handy, if not expert, in many aspects of running an application on a public cloud. And long-term, large-scale economics of cloud deployments differ drastically from their traditional counterparts, and create new management challenges.

Yet, because these possible issues are usually not enough to balance out a long wait for an internal IT department to address a new project’s needs, the added complexity of running an application on a cloud will not likely dissuade most project stakeholders from using this infrastructure.

New projects are the gateway drug to public clouds. Thus, the move to cloud hosting providers is slowly but surely killing internal enterprise IT.

olivier pomel

By Olivier Pomel – Co-Founder and CEO

Prior to founding Datadog, Olivier Pomel built data systems for K-12 teachers as a VP, Technology for Wireless Generation, growing the development team from a handful to close to 100 of the best engineers in NYC until the company’s acquisition by News Corp. Before Wireless Generation, Olivier held software engineering positions at IBM Research and several internet startups. Olivier is an original author of the VLC media player and holds a MS in CS from the Ecole Centrale Paris.

The Impact Of IT Trends In Mobile Cloud Computing

The Impact Of IT Trends In Mobile Cloud Computing

The Impact of IT Trends in Mobile Cloud Computing

The Rise of Mobile Commerce: Most modern businesses use mobile devices in their daily transactions. In fact, studies show that more than 30% of all mobile users spend around 27 minutes every day texting, calling or video chatting. Based on your budget, ?-commerce’ can be structured into either an app or interactive mobile site. Phone-based websites give users the convenience of accessing virtual content from any place or time. Nowadays, people walk with their handsets everywhere they go even when traveling.Mobile-Graph

Fragility of mobile devices: With the ongoing rapid development of wireless communication and internet connectivity, most modern communication devices come fitted with digital images, portable cameras and other related features. This helps users view images at high definition and also share them through instant cloud computing platforms.Today, it’s possible to make unique applications using watermarking software. This unique cloud application helps in image authentication as well as tamper localization. However, there are various demerits that mobile devices have when it comes to cloud computing. First, some of them have limited memory capacity and cannot open big files, moreover since they are portable there’s always the risk of loss due to misplacement or theft.

Increase in the Worker Mobility: Statistics show that three-quarters of all modern employees use handsets to increase their productivity. Most of them are using modern devices such as tablets and smartphones, these appliances offer users better virtual working tools that are relevant to the fast-paced corporate world. Therefore, companies should always try to find ways of supporting the use of mobile devices within the work setting. This can help employees access various communication systems, data recovery and backup solutions and applications with ease. Mobile cloud computing allows different people to access information from a common resource network, however the main advantage of this technology is that users can view files even on offline mode. It can be used by firms to save on the costs of installing different data programs for each and every employee.

Fragmentation of Devices: Mobile phone fragmentation occurs when some subscribers are using an old OS edition, while others are running their devices on new and updated versions. This phenomenal can be worsened if the main wireless carrier is charged with deciding the deployment of OS updates, it would be better if the phone’s manufacturer does this for efficiency. Fragmentation may be a setback for professional software developers, most of who need to create different editions of an app to keep up with technological advancements and competition from other programmers. Device fragmentation can also be a hindrance for IT experts, most of who need to manage and safeguard their OS’s from intrusion by hackers. Different software editions have unique capacities, therefore making it hard to stem illegal updates from unknown sources. Nevertheless, this problem is more common in Android devices and not those that run on iOS.

HTML5: The HTML5 technology comprises of JavaScript APIs and CSS3 applications. CSS stands for Cascading Structural Sheets such as footers, headers and unique document figures. They help mobile phone subscribers to access unique content and layouts from their devices. HTML5 is important in mobile cloud computing since it helps in making adjustments on factors like screen orientation, screen size and image resolution.

By Deney Dentel,

Deney Dentel is the CEO at Nordisk Systems, Inc., a managed server virtualization and cloud computing service provider company in Portland, OR. Deney is the only localized and authorised  IBM ProtecTIER business partner in Pacific Northwest. You can also follow him on LinkedIn.

SaaS For Startups: 6 Things Every CEO Should Know

SaaS For Startups: 6 Things Every CEO Should Know

SaaS For Startups: 6 Things Every CEO Should Know

SaaS packages have evolved from large enterprise commodities to must-have solutions for businesses of all sizes. Once reserved for large corporate infrastructures, the evolution in cloud technology and the BYOD trends have changed how businesses use and license out SaaS platforms. That being said, with all of the choices out there, it can be difficult to choose exactly which service platform is really the most efficient and cost-effective for a small startup.

For startup CEOs, it’s your job to weigh the cost of investments in hopes they’ll support the future of your business. Here are the six major components to consider when you’re shopping for your SaaS provider.

The Provider Must Implement Efficiently

The importance of a provider to install the software quickly and efficiently cannot be emphasized enough. If a provider is slow in installation, it’s likely his product will mirror that inefficiency. Employees should be able to use the software in a short period of time, so that workflow isn’t hindered. The system should be cross-compatible with multiple operating systems like Windows, Mac, Linux, etc. It should also support all major web browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera.

Ask your potential provider about time estimates for installation and compatibility with these operating systems and web browsers. If the provider doesn’t seem confident about a quick and simple operation, then continue looking for another SaaS provider.

The Software Should be Customizable

The SaaS platform you’re looking at should allow for specific customizations based on your audience and business needs. Your provider should be able to mold their software according to your business requirements to enhance workflow and compliance. If the provider is unable to do this, you should continue to shop around. There are SaaS platforms available that will meet all of your business needs, and they’ll allow you to keep up with the advancing business technology market.

The Application Must Have Usable Features

You should remember that buying SaaS is a business investment, and just like all the other investments you’ll be making as a startup CEO, you want to get your money’s worth in the long-run, even if that means a steep cost up front. If you choose a provider that offers simple, scaled-down applications because they’re cheaper, you’ll end up spending more money on software in the end. You’ll also spend more money on fixing the simple bugs in the software, and you’ll lose money on software lag and lack of efficiency.

An important feature, as well, is the SaaS platform’s mobile scalability. Employees should be able to access the software in the cloud via any mobile service securely and easily in order to maximize productivity. Whether it’s a tablet, or a T-mobile cell phone, the platform you choose must flexible to accommodate both your clients’ and employees’ needs

The Software Must Have Inter-operating Applications

SaaS providers should have several applications that work with one another so your business operations will run efficiently. Not only does it show that the provider can handle multiple software programs, it also creates more cohesive operations for your business. The provider you choose should only use powerful, large-scale servers, as well. These will help to enhance cloud-based infrastructure so that computers don’t lag. Be sure to research what your provider’s software can handle before you buy it.

Also, see if the company has a sandbox trial version. This is a watered-down version of the company’s SaaS that has minimal customization features. However, you’ll be able to stress-test the software, find out what you can implement with it, and be able to test features. If your provider offers this version, definitely test it out before you sign a contract with them or buy a membership.

The Software Must Support a Secure Cloud Infrastructure

Because SaaS operates via the Web, it’s crucial that the software supports a secure cloud infrastructure so that you can avoid potential security threats and data breaches. You’ll need it to protect and backup your valuable and private information including social security numbers, phone numbers, addresses, and confidential documents. With a quality cloud infrastructure, your employees will be able to use the software safely and remotely so they can work from home, or while on business trips.

The Provider Must Have Longevity

Research the company you’re thinking of going with. Do they have a good track record? Have they been out for a while? Knowing a company has a good reputation will give you better insight into your business with them. It will also tell you if they have endurance and will be able to keep up with changing technology.

You don’t want to start a company who invests in failing products and has to deal with the headache of malfunctioning software. Follow these steps to make sure you’re buying the most efficient and fitting SaaS for your business. It needs to be customizable and simple so that everyone who works for you can operate it easily. What have your experiences been with SaaS?

By Miles Young

Miles Young is a freelance writer, tech geek and world traveler. He specializes in business, communication and mobile technologies. Follow him @MrMilesYoung on Twitter.

Cloud Infographic: Information Security Workforce

Cloud Infographic: Information Security Workforce

Cloud Infographic: Information Security Workforce

Everyday there are more articles citing security as the top concern holding back public cloud adoption. While cloud means many things to different people, so does the term security. In discussions with business and industry experts, security concerns really boil down to the classic CIA—now CIAA—triad: confidentiality, integrity, availability and the more recently appended “audit”.  Continue Reading

Included is an excellent infographic provided by the group at PraetorianGuard covering the ever important issues involving information security in the workforce.

security-workforce

Infographic Source:  PraetorianGuard

Oracle Introduces Oracle Government Cloud For North American Region

Oracle Introduces Oracle Government Cloud For North American Region

Tech giant Oracle launched the Oracle Government Cloud today in the North American region with an aim to strengthen its connection with government agencies as the top cloud service provider. The Oracle Government Cloud, in its essence, is an advanced form of the Oracle Cloud solution, delivering a broad and complete portfolio of public, private and hybrid cloud offerings.

Through a news release on its website, Oracle claimed that its new cloud solution is the ‘best-in-class’ option available in the market that offers ‘integrated capabilities across multiple service options’ for government agencies.

Oracle’s announcement comes on the back of the United States government’s latest Cloud First policy which stemmed from the critical financial reality of the country, as the US looks to reduce the cost of management and maintenance of its IT-related operations.

In the news release, Oracle stated that by deploying an innovative solution in the form of the Oracle Government Cloud, government agencies would be capable of availing themselves more agility and options as they manage operations and deliver constituent services.

With packages like the Oracle Service Cloud, Oracle RightNow Policy Automation and Oracle Learn Cloud, these agencies would also be able to streamline a breadth of business processes, from financial and human resources management to customer service and project management.

Oracle also announced that it would soon make services like Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) available to its government clients on the cloud platform. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Adelaide O’Brien, Research Director of IDC Government Insights said that the announcement from Oracle holds deep significance in terms of the current landscape of cloud technologies in the government sector.

With Oracle Government Cloud, Oracle provides government organizations with a secure, flexible platform that helps them realize new efficiencies, respond quickly to changes in legislation and policy and deliver excellent constituent service,” he opined in the interview.

The Wall Street Journal also quoted Mark Johnson, senior vice president of Oracle Public Sector, who stated that: “We are very excited to meet our public sector customers’ demands for a highly secure, robust suite of cloud solutions built for government.”

The maturity and transparency of the standards-based Oracle Government Cloud will enable agencies to confidently move mission-critical government applications to the cloud without compromising security, performance, or reliability,” he added. “We are committed to helping agencies enhance operational efficiency through the cloud,” the VP further said in the interview.

By Blake Adams

CloudTweaks Comics
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Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…

The Internet of Things Lifts Off To The Cloud

The Internet of Things Lifts Off To The Cloud

The Staggering Size And Potential Of The Internet of Things Here’s a quick statistic that will blow your mind and give you a glimpse into the future. When you break that down, it translates to 127 new devices online every second. In only a decade from now, every single vehicle on earth will be connected…

Cloud Infographic – Monetizing Internet Of Things

Cloud Infographic – Monetizing Internet Of Things

Monetizing Internet Of Things There are many interesting ways in which companies are looking to connect devices to the cloud. From the vehicles to kitchen appliances the internet of things is already a $1.9 trillion dollar market based on research estimates from IDC. Included is a fascinating infographic provided by AriaSystems which shows us some of the exciting…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Achieving Network Security In The IoT

Security In The IoT The network security market is experiencing a pressing and transformative change, especially around access control and orchestration. Although it has been mature for decades, the network security market had to transform rapidly with the advent of the BYOD trend and emergence of the cloud, which swept enterprises a few years ago.…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…