Category Archives: Security

Cloud-only vs. Cloud-based:  What’s The Best File Sharing For Business?

Cloud-only vs. Cloud-based: What’s The Best File Sharing For Business?

The cloud file-sharing market has exploded over recent years with users embracing this latest technology to simplify both their personal and professional lives. While cloud has helped remove a lot of the headaches around storage and file access, it has also presented its own challenges. With an increasing number of people using consumer-grade products in the workplace, many are leaving company systems open to threats and exposing potentially sensitive data to unwanted access. So what can be done to address this? Well, it all starts with a simple definition….

On the face of it, there is little difference between file sharing for consumers and file sharing for businesses; they both provide easy access to data via an internet connection. However, consumer file sharing has been designed for easy, light use – the sharing of family pictures or videos for example. These solutions lack the security, permissioning, and auditability of those designed for the enterprise.

File Sharing for business, on the other hand, has been designed from the ground up with security and stability in mind as compared to being an afterthought to an easy, lightweight solution. Demands by enterprise solutions have always been vastly different than those of the consumer; although, the simplicity is an absolute necessity in either case.

With so many of us using the cloud in our personal lives, it was inevitable that this would spill over to the business world — the consumerization of IT strikes again.  Employees have shunned “sneakernet” using memory sticks, CDs, and DVDs, and have instead started uploading work files to consumer clouds alongside their holiday pictures and favorite music. This presents issues for enterprise IT teams who are desperate to prevent the leak of sensitive materials and security breaches. They need to provide employees with a file-sharing platform that is simple for users but created for business.

Security, access permissions, complete audibility, and device controls will continue to be a core focus for administrators needing to control access levels and manage compliance in real time.  Business file sharing will also need to take advantage of local storage whenever possible.  Local storage provides the fastest access speed possible, does not clog the connection to the Internet, and provides business continuity in case of Internet outages. And the cloud provides accessibility to remote employees, business partners, and clients.

But providing the right solution is just part of the battle. Once the right solution is in place, ensuring high levels of adoption is the next challenge. Demonstrating ease of use to employees along with showing that they can now access any file in the company that they have permission to access (instead of just the ones that they remembered to drop in a folder on their computer) will go a long way to facilitating adoption.

So why run the risk of exposing  your business data to major security issues from consumer file sharing?  It’s time to put your critical data into a purpose-built platform designed to meet all the file sharing needs and requirements of businesses, not consumers.

Rajesh Ram 'RR'

By Rajesh Ram

Rajesh is a co-founder of Egnyte. He leads the product management and customer support teams. Rajesh’s strength in defining, delivering and supporting software solutions was developed while at Oracle, KPMG consulting and Valdero Corporation. Rajesh holds a BS in Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras and received an MS in Industrial Engineering from the University of Minnesota.

Maximize Your IT And VMWorld: A Hybrid Approach To A New Chapter In IT

Maximize Your IT And VMWorld: A Hybrid Approach To A New Chapter In IT

Maximize Your IT and VMWorld: a hybrid approach to a new chapter in IT

One of the most fascinating elements of the new chapter in IT history that virtualization represents is the degree to which companies who are essentially competitors, or who have long-held alliances with others, actually work together in an open forum somewhat reminiscent of the open-source code communities that gave birth to products like Linux. There is no naiveté in that statement; obviously, every company is in it to make money for its shareholders, investors and employees, however the degree of collaboration demonstrated by many of the industry’s biggest players is impressive.

This is something that Chris Carrier, Director, Alliance Machris-vmwarerketing at VMWare, understands well. He is involved with maximizeyourit.com, a joint venture between Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), Intel and VMWare, intended to help companies and organizations understand the ideas behind the Software Defined Data Center and Intelligent Storage; in other words, to help prepare them for transition to the private cloud.

The goal of maximizeyourit.com, he says is twofold: first to generate awareness and comfort with the concepts of cloud and virtualization, and second to obviously demonstrate the capacity of its three founding companies to assist and oversee their clients’ transition, and to ease that transition from the traditional “building block approach.”

He has always been impressed, for example by the capacity of HDS to support its powerful assertion of 100 percent uptime. “HDS was very insightful when they built their service line, and now they have a product that supports the statement of 100 percent uptime.” He adds, “many companies are tentative about making a statement like that, but They do not regret putting that out there.”

It is this type of innovation and initiative that seems to attract proactive companies, whether as co-developers of a solution, or as clients. “We do get partners that step up and bring a lot to the table,” he says, “there is a culture of encouraging initiative.” In other words, Carrier states, “companies are betting their future on the products of other companies.”

CloudTweaks asked Chris for a short state-of-the-union summary; where are we right now, and where are we going with all this technology? He responded, “we have finally crossed the threshold where cloud is a reality. The majority of companies see it as a reality.” What he sees as the next chapter basically involve more steps towards making infrastructure invisible. He uses the phone as an example. In the days of the rotary phone, everything was visible. For example making a long distance call involved the assistance of an operator who set up the call, and in some cases scheduled it for a later time. Now, he points out, we have become so comfortable with picking up a smartphone and stating, ‘call Jimmy’ that most of us have forgotten about the infrastructure underneath, to the point that we seldom even memorize phone numbers anymore.

Carrier sees this new chapter as being rife with healthy challenges. Numerous add-in companies, for example, experts in security, or compliance, will work with clients in a more open way to help them to prove they are compliant and ready for business. There is a tangible sense of overall collaboration; even vendors that compete are working together to push innovation further.

Naturally, in line with his role at VMWare, Carrier is very pleased with this year’s event. It is seeing representation from all segments of the economy and many areas of the world. “People are paying the attendance fees because they are seeing the value of the event.” Indeed this is corroborated by any random sampling of tweets sent by attendees – VMWorld 2013 has provided a great deal of practical knowledge for IT people to chew on and learn from, rather than just product displays. “People,” he says, “are talking tech.”

CloudTweaks asked Chris about the 90-10 ratio of male to female conference attendees as an index of gender representation in the IT world. He recognizes that there is a significant imbalance, but has seen, in his years both at VMWorld and previously, a slow change as more women enter into the industry.

Carrier is interested to see how the VMWorld Conference in Barcelona will compare in terms of acceptance and innovation in the “old world.” He says that this event, as well as the regional events held in the South East Asian/Pacific rim areas will help demonstrate to those organizations that are still on the fence that virtualization and cloud technology is now a true reality.

The VMWorld2013 San Francisco event runs through August 29, and the Barcelona event runs October 15-17. Both events can be followed through the hashtags #VMWorld and #VMWorld2013.

By Steve Prentice

Post is sponsored by Hitachi and MaximizeYourIT.com

How Cloud Computing Is Going To Change The Future Of ERP

How Cloud Computing is going to change the future of ERP

Large businesses depend a lot on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and every decision taken by them is solely based on information extracted by using ERP application. There is no business domain that does not use ERP in today’s fast moving world. ERP is installed on a centralized server in the company and is managed by a team of specially trained people who look over all the functions and operations of it. From generating critical real time reports to marking employees’ attendance, ERP plays a critical role in controlling the flow of information throughout the company.

With all the benefits of ERP, it still requires a lot more attention and resources to be managed. With the increase in cost of maintenance, many companies are thinking to move the whole ERP system over the cloud. Cloud Computing which was once seen as a total disaster for the ERP systems is now being linked with it for the better management of ERP.

Why go for Cloud ERP 

Unlike traditional ERP system, Cloud ERP provides much more flexibility and ease of use without increase the cost of setup and still providing much more features that are fit for every type of business.

Lower Cost and Licensing 

Unlike traditional ERP, companies do not need to purchase a license for every user that uses the system. Instead, a company can simply pay a fixed amount for the Cloud ERP license and then everyone can use the system. In a nutshell, Cloud ERP is cost effective solution for small and medium sized businesses.

System Updates OTA 

The biggest advantage for deploying Cloud ERP is that companies do not need to update their systems every time to get new features and upgrades. Cloud ERP gets updated OTA and saves a lot of time and effort as compared to getting updates on the traditional ERP.

Better Data Management 

Cloud ERP also provides better scalability over managing a company’s data placed in the cloud. With the whole data in the cloud, it is very easy for any company to move it anywhere at any time without losing it.

More Security for Company Data 

Cloud ERP also provides top level security and privacy to a company’s data by using strict protocols and mechanism that can protect data from any potential threat.

Verdict 

Cloud Computing and ERP together can bring innovations and can drastically change the fortune of a company. Not many Cloud ERP systems are available in the market but according to analysts, it can take up to 5 years to fully transfer from traditional ERP to a Cloud based ERP.

By Walter Bailey

Going Virtual? Keep One Eye On The Hardware And The Other On Habits

Going Virtual? Keep One Eye On The Hardware And The Other On Habits

Going Virtual?

Central to the huge trade and education event called VMWorld is the notion that everything is going virtual in a big way. Terms such as virtualization and software defined networking are now becoming mainstream, or more more precisely, must now become mainstream, and the 22,000+ conference attendees are listening and talking intently. VMWorld CEO Pat Gelsinger, as well as VMWorld Hybrid Cloud SVP Bill Fathers, and others demonstrated during the Monday morning opener that not only is virtualization crucial to the commercial success of organizations moving forward, but many key players including eBay and GE have already embraced it.

This comes as no surprise to experts like Iddo Kadim, Director of Datacenter Technologies for Intel. He points out that this is no mere swing on the roundabout, a repetition of the growth of mainframe or networked technologies from previous eras; it is now a matter of scale across more than just the physical dimension. The high-tech environment has grown to a size where management of it has gone far beyond simply being a hardware issue. “The manual processes that are required to manage it the old way,” he says, “can’t keep up with the growth that is required to satisfy the demand for compute, storage and networking.” As an example he adds, “you can count 100 jelly-beans, even if it takes time to get it right. But try counting 10,000.”

Kadim states that in this newest of new ages, there needs to be a desegregation of control from physical infrastructure. There needs to be an automated, separated place where software resides a layer above the hardware itself, in order to facilitate multiple operating systems and applications.

He points out that there still exists great deal of confusion with the term cloud, let alone virtualization. Executives, he said, must be careful not to get carried away. As with all major change, they might find untenable risks to their business if issues of control are managed separately, such as by a third party provider who, by owning the information, essentially owns the business.

In makes sense, he says, for organizations to first build a private cloud. By doing this they can virtualize the separate elements and grown and scale as needed. He describes this as a type of automation umbrella: “build internally with an awareness for an eventual hybrid cloud later.”

Kadim also made an excellent point about the inevitable abstraction that comes from virtualization. Even as a company builds a virtualization strategy, at end of day, the applications still work on hardware – they work differently, and more dynamically, but machines are still there, somewhere. That means that to have real control, decision-makers still need to have information about their infrastructure. They still need to say, “these are my walls, these are my machines.” Even though the data and the processing have become virtual, adequate information in on the mechanical is essential.

CloudTweaks asked Kadim for his thoughts regarding the recent outages suffered by Amazon, Google, Apple, and Sony, and how this affects public perception and acceptance of major technological leaps forward such as those we now face. He echoed the sentiments of many leaders in the virtualization community, including Simon Crosby, ex of Intel and Citrix, and now founder of and CTO of Bromium, who, at Interop 2011 stated that cloud technology, in terms of reliability and safety, is much like commercial airlines, in that big planes do not go down very often, and when they do, the results can be painful, but overall, the cloud remains safer than IT infrastructure, as planes are when compared to private cars.

Bad things happen, Kadim continues, even when redundancy is built in, when there is a confluence of events. Sometimes the failure is total, and other times it is partial, as in the example of Netflix, where some services blacked out but others remained. The bottom line, he says is that there must be clear communication between a company and its cloud vendors – clear dialog, and clear understanding. As with many other areas of life, it is up to the customer to establish the rules and to demand clarity, to ensure that loss of control or of data or even presence is unlikely and never total.

There are many providers out there who will start to offer virtualization services to align with the growth in demand. Some will come from a hosting background and will build an enterprise mindset. Others will embrace the Amazon model: a blank infrastructure with an impressive partner ecosystem, which is built well, with other well-built services included on top.

Kadim warns that as organizations large and small move into the new world of software defined networking, effectively separating the intelligence from the hardware, that they do so without falling prey to either hype or outdated mindsets.

Mr. Kadim and other brilliant minds are here with CloudTweaks at the VMWorld 2013 conference in San Francisco. The conference repeats in Barcelona in October.

By Steve Prentice

Post is sponsored by Hitachi and MaximizeYourIT.com

Don’t Recover From A Disaster – Prevent One

Don’t Recover From A Disaster – Prevent One

Recover From A Disaster

Protect your cloud with the right disaster prevention plan

When it comes to the cloud, convenience and reliability have always been two of its most shining traits. According to a recent AT&T report, 62 percent of businesses use cloud services for business continuity – an unexpected but understandable number. Just as a well-performing cloud delivers speed and accessibility when it comes to critical data, its virtualized infrastructure makes it a natural solution for disaster preparedness.

Yet in a year of high-profile outages, many businesses have been taking a second look at their incident response plans. This year alone has seen outages from Amazon, Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft – brands that most of us associate with uptime and reliability. Watching the titans of cloud environments experience failure has left many businesses uneasy.

data-recovery

The cost of even a brief outage can be extreme. Some media outlets estimated that Amazon’s 49-minute outage cost the company upwards of $5 million in revenue. Dropbox’s reputation for reliable cloud storage took a hit when their customers were unable to access their documents for a full 16 hours – the first of two outages this year. The truth is that even minor downtime can impact consumer trust. And irate customers who find an error message in lieu of their social media profiles or shopping carts often vent their frustrations on forums and social networks, further defacing the brand.

The key to preventing this kind of catastrophe: a strong disaster prevention plan, whereby a cloud infrastructure is configured to ensure the continuity of IT services and business processes.

Cloud crisis protection – what level do you need?

Businesses understand the need to keep their cloud-based platforms running and available even in the event of a large-scale failure. Whether it’s an external attack or an internal datacenter or infrastructure issue, the right disaster prevention solution can mitigate downtime and provide critical services. But if you’re like many IT pros, you might not be sure of what level of protection you need.

Typically there are three disaster prevention levels. Choosing the right one depends on your business’s Recovery Time Objective (RTO) and its tolerance level of downtime.  Take a look at the practices and benefits of each to identify on the optimal solution for your specific organization:.

Hot/Cold: This configuration covers the basic needs for continuity in the cloud, but also has the longest RTO. A typical Hot/Cold solution would be a single server located in a remote datacenter where file and database backups are shipped and stored on a regular basis. This plan is founded on the premise of having backups on hand with the recovery expectation being 24 or more hours. What this means on a practical level: in the event of a disaster, additional services would need to be brought online and updated, with the data from the backups imported to the new environment. Hosting a notification page during a downtime event is also advisable.

  • Ideal business profile: This is generally a good starting point for small to medium business or startups working with a limited budget. If this sounds like you, consider your uptime needs. Can you accept 24 hours of downtime? If your environment isn’t web-facing, such as an internal app, or is a non-critical information website, a disaster prevention plan may be the right option. The primary criteria here is that an outage won’t have a large-scale financial impact on your business.

Hot/Warm: This disaster prevention solution provides a medium RTO, meaning that a full restoration of services can range from minutes to a few hours (depending on the configuration), during which time a baseline of limited services is available. Typically, a Hot/Warm environment consists of a replicated production environment in terms of server count, but with the resources scaled down to minimal levels. This mirror site would be hosted at a remote facility with a mechanism to provide active failover, such as with DNS active/failover products. If your cloud hosting provider has the ability to automatically scale resources on demand, this is even better as the server can grab additional resources as needed when the failover event happens.

  • Ideal business profile: This solution can be used for businesses of all sizes, but is especially suited to companies that would like to keep some services available no matter what, while accepting downtime for others. Can your business get by with a backup site that offers a limited number of features while your issue is being resolved? If so, this might be the option for you. But if you require little-to-no downtime, there is a better approach.

Hot/Hot: This is the gold-standard of a disaster prevention posture as it provides maximum failure resiliency and allows for additional benefits such as higher capacity, Geo-Load balancing and fault tolerance. A typical infrastructure would include two or more production environments located in isolated datacenters, with full data replication from files to databases. DNS Traffic Management or Advanced Traffic management platforms can provide both the Geo-Load balancing capabilities and the ability to prevent a failed environment from actively serving traffic.

  • Ideal business profile: Companies that can’t afford any impact to their user base. If you require maximum uptime and know that even a brief outage would damage your reputation and sales, then this is your safest option. Even in the event of an attack or internal crisis, your site will stay up with all of its features available and offer a seamless user experience.

While assessing your risk level and uptime needs are essential steps in choosing the right disaster prevention plan, don’t forget to take other basic steps to protect yourself. Making simple changes within your environment can minimize problems down the road, such as replicating files across production environments and avoiding data collision. If your site accepts user-generated content, consider making developmental changes to the application to ensure that no problems or conflicts arise. Even basic changes can mitigate some of the worst repercussions of a large-scale failure.

Finally, remember that the right plan for your business can be accessible from both a budget and implementation standpoint. Intelligent disaster prevention is about preparation – taking the right actions now to avoid costly measures later in the wake of a catastrophe. By acting on the criteria above, you can get started on an appropriate plan to safeguard your environment, your brand and your user experience.

By Dustin Larmier, Senior Solutions Architect, FireHost

Making Virtualization Tangible: The CDW Bus

Making Virtualization Tangible: The CDW Bus

Making Virtualization Tangible: The CDW Bus

bus2

The VMWorld Convention, currently underway in San Francisco has brought 22,000 IT professionals face to face with the future. From the opening presentation, which included mini-keynotes from industry heavyweights to the dizzying selection of breakouts and events, through to an exhibit floor larger (seemingly) than many actual countries, this extremely well-run multi-day extravaganza is helping drive home the awareness that we live in a new age, where virtualization of information technology rules.

As Iddo Kadim, Director of Datacenter Technologies for Intel points out, this is not a reinvention of the wheel. The current infrastructure of servers, hardware and software has run out of places to grow, and the new era of virtualization stands to usher in new and remarkable advancements in speed, storage and throughput.

bus

Which is why it is such a pleasure to hang out in the CDW bus. CDW is a problem-solving company that helps consolidate all of the key elements of maintaining a modern-day data presence, including, mobility, networking, cloud computing and more.

Whereas all of the other vendors at the convention use sophisticated graphics and animations to illustrate their virtual product, CDW decided to put it all inside a vintage GM FutureLiner (The concept of a Futureliner), and take it out on the road. As their Lead Solutions Architect, Dan Vargas explains, the bus was first produced in the late 1940’s, and early 1950’s to address the postwar appetite for the new and futuristic. What better way is there, he says, to demonstrate the new and futuristic vision of cloud and virtualization than to package it inside a really retro-cool looking vehicle.

Although the bus is somewhat dwarfed by the enormous space of the Moscone Center, Vargas tells CloudTweaks that they drive the vehicle to all kinds of events including tailgate parties. Inside, carefully constructed display cases show off racks of servers and machines from all of the major players, highlighted in sleek red lighting.

The bus is no power-lightweight. It currently draws 100 amps and talks to its own cloud. There are plans to create an entire SDN network inside for a future tour.

Although some might categorize this as a simple marketing ploy, the bus helps create an image of high technology combined with tangibility, allowing curious potential customers to “kick the tires” of the technology in their own parking lot. And that’s a tangible advantage in a virtual world.

By Steve Prentice

Event: VMworld ’13 To Kick Off Today!

Event: VMworld ’13 To Kick Off Today!

Event: VMworld ’13 To Kick Off Today!

The 10th annual edition of the VMworld,  the annual showcase cutting edge virtualization technology including cloud computing is scheduled to kick off today amid much fanfare in San Francisco.

VMware Inc, the organizer behind the event, is hoping for the grandest of assembly in terms of technological advances as virtualization, or “software defined” networking as some put it since it became the hottest trend in the IT market in recent times, reports the Wall Street Journal.

VMwold-Logo

This year’s conference is estimated to attract over 22,000 visitors and some of the major market leaders are rumored to make breakthrough announcements within the span of the 5 days of the conference.

VMware, majority-owned by EMC Corp, made use of a concept titled virtualization what allows for a layer of software on server systems to facilitate multiple operating systems and applications.

Companies, especially the small and medium enterprises are using it throughout the world to save money as more work is getting done from their servers while computing jobs are being completed within minutes.

So why is this conference so important for the cloud technology, and virtualization in general? Joe Skorupa, an analyst at the research firm Gartner Inc has the answer for you. “It’s about separating the intelligence from the hardware, making the network programmable,” he says.

This conference is perhaps the biggest window for some of the smaller companies to portray the technologies and gadgets that can attract customers while bigger companies like Cisco, Microsoft and Oracle are vying to grab the biggest chunk of the market pie.

The event is likely to feature a number of major keynote speeches as well, with VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger speaking at the inaugural ceremony about the next generation of technology and the way the IT world is heading.

VMware President and COO Carl Eschenbach, along with engineers from the company would present the latest innovations in virtualization from VMWare on the third day of the event, though the company is yet to unveil the technologies it would present at the conference.

On the second day, VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger, New York Times best-selling author and noted technology futurist Paul Saffo will moderate a distinguished panel of C-level IT leaders about the challenges virtualization and cloud technology faces in the upcoming future.

Here at CloudTweaks, we keep an eye open for the latest news and updates from the VMworld as we bring you the scoops as they happen. Also, as always, our in-house expert Steve Prentice will be bringing you the insights and expert opinions from the VMworld.

Hold on to your hats folks, because the VMworld 2013 is about to kick off.

By Blake Adams

Top Tips To Help You Choose The Right Cloud Backup Service Provider

Top Tips To Help You Choose The Right Cloud Backup Service Provider

Businesses both small and large rely on cloud backup for its vast range of benefits with security topping the list. The cloud is a system where all your valuable data can be stored without absolutely any fear of losing it. However, this does not mean you select any cloud backup service provider that you come across. You need to be selective and very careful when making that decision since a wrong one can jeopardize your company. In today’s technologically driven world, cloud backup is a common phenomenon and several cloud backup service providers are offering varied additional services to attract maximum business. From large corporate firms to several medical transcription companies, all rely on this service and it is gaining importance with each passing day. However, you need to follow the guidelines given below to ensure that you do not end up accepting an offer from the wrong cloud backup service provider.

  1. Know exactly what the requirements of your business are:

Not all the cloud backup services are a good choice for your company. A cloud backup service provider offers a plethora of services that cater to each and every type of business. The glut of services may not necessarily be important for your business. Therefore, there is no point in jumping in with both feet for a service that will not be doing much for you. Therefore, the first thing that you need to look for is the requirement of your business before making a decision.

  1. Security plays a massive role:

The major reason for relying on a cloud backup service is for its ability to provide a great amount of security. Therefore, before you entrust your important business files to a cloud backup service, you must ensure that they use the most current version of firewall and other such security measures. Whether you choose public cloud storage or private, security is of prime importance and therefore, you must never compromise on the security aspect. However, different cloud backup providers offer different protocols as per their standards. Thus, you must closely look at the protocol details of every service provider before jumping to a conclusion.

  1. Accessibility:

Medical transcription companies can benefit hugely from cloud backup services as they can store their archived works on a cloud that is safe and secure and which will help you retrieve your work whenever you need it. However, the cloud backup service should provide easy accessibility features so that you do not have to spend hours for a file that you need on an emergency basis. Usually, a good cloud backup service will not only provide easy accessibility, it will also boats of mobilized features wherein you can retrieve data even when on the go by way of mobile app and also provide automatic syncing so that you need not manually upload files to the cloud every single time, making it a more time consuming process.

  1. The various options for storage capacity:

As a rule of thumb, you must always opt for the unlimited package if you are involved in a business that requires you to keep updating your work with new documents while still having access to the older ones. Selecting the unlimited package also allows you certain perks and the price is usually cheaper as compared to a limited package.

  1. Judging according to the cost:

An expensive cloud backup provider is not always the best. The best thing that you can do is compare the prices of the various cloud backup services that are available against the features that they provide to come to a suitable conclusion.

By Eustace Willis

Eustace Willis has worked for several medical transcription companies before starting his own. He has a professional background in medicine and is familiar with the various medical terminologies. He also loves watching medical shows on television and is an ardent sports fan.

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Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Is Machine Learning Making Your Data Scientists Obsolete?

Machine Learning and Data Scientists In a recent study, almost all the businesses surveyed stated that big data analytics were fundamental to their business strategies. Although the field of computer and information research scientists is growing faster than any other occupation, the increasing applicability of data science across business sectors is leading to an exponential…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud Cloud computing is more than just another storage tier. Imagine if you’re able to scale up 10x just to handle seasonal volumes or rely on a true disaster-recovery solution without upfront capital. Although the pay-as-you-go pricing model of cloud computing makes it a noticeable expense, it’s the only solution for many…