Category Archives: Security

Private And Public Cloud Migration Standards

Private And Public Cloud Migration Standards

Cloud Migration Standards

Ever since cloud computing has seen mainstream adoption, the ability to migrate data between public or private clouds is becoming a key concern, especially due to the large size and the cost involved in the switch. The first question that comes to mind when discussing cloud migration is if there are any cloud standards that will ensure interoperability? This is because in the absence of such frameworks, the effort of translation or manual data transfer operations might exceed budgets, especially for large public clouds. Hence it is essential to understand if there are any interoperability standards that may help in the migration. Another key point is to understand the reasons behind a cloud migration whose assessment will justify such a shift.

We can say that cloud interoperability is still a topic under discussion by various cloud providers including HP, Red Hat, Rackspace, Citrix etc. The forum known as ‘OpenStack’ is promoting to build an open platform with open standards that various cloud providers can integrate in their systems making them more interoperable. The platform is backed by several players as seen in this list of supporting companies and many are hopeful that the cloud community will soon witness a complete set of standards along with guidelines to form an OpenStack certified cloud system. The standard is expected to cover all major components in the cloud including compute, networking, storage and OpenStack shared services running on standard hardware and providing an OpenStack dashboard. The custom user applications will run on top of this framework. This is collectively known as OpenStack cloud operating system that is easier to move between public and private cloud setups due to ease of interoperability.

server

Another organization that runs by the name of Open Data Centre Alliance (ODCA) is also working to formalize the a specifications set for enterprise ready cloud. They have released a virtual machine interoperability usage white paper that describes their suggestions with examples from a test bed which features several offerings in this proposal along with architecture diagrams. The paper concludes with the statement that, “A capability for VM interoperability is an important precondition to truly realize the oft expressed benefits of virtualized clouds, such as the ability to balance resources through fungible pools of resources, business continuity and load balancing by leveraging distributed publicly available resources, as well as demonstrable avoidance of lock in to a single Cloud Provider, platform or technology.”

There is a cost associated with cloud migration which becomes a significant factor in making a decision about this move. The key factors to consider include IT service reimplementation, data destruction and sanitization, developers resource training, user guidance, regulatory compliance, vendor lock-ins and portability. Hence it comes down to whether or not this shift is justified in terms of expenditure, downtime and future gain in the business. Ideally one should look into cloud systems can support at least one open standard to facilitate future migration.

By Salam UI Haq

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications

Simplifying Workplace Collaboration Using Cloud Communications Cloud…

gives enterprises an opportunity to streamline all their business operations into one big place, the “Cloud”. With multitudes of small, medium and big enterprises embracing the Cloud and the early adopters broadening their penetration, why should communications be left behind? For years, voice communications systems within an organization, big or small, were never considered to be a good candidate for deployment on the Cloud under a SaaS or IaaS model. Thanks to the “liberalization” of communication technologies, Cloud based communications have made their way into the Cloud and are here to stay. Services like Twilio have now made it easier than ever to build enterprise communication services which entirely reside on the Cloud, saving customers the cost, complexity and time it requires to set up an on-premise voice communication infrastructure. Customer services, both internal and external will stand to benefit the most.

communications

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

In the early days of phone based customer service, complete voice routing and phone systems had to be installed in a dedicated customer care “call center”. This changed with IP based voice systems which promised significant cost savings, both in terms of infrastructure required to operate a service center and also the cost of voice calls. With Cloud, another major shift is happening, serving voice based services directly from the Cloud, without the need for sophisticated and bulky infrastructure and delivering better, if not same quality of service. Cloud communications have also achieved something which even IP telephony could not: liberalization of voice communication services. This is evident with the success which Twilio has achieved, both in terms of adoption and the quality it delivers. What’s interesting is that even independent developers can put together a voice communication service within minutes! I personally tried it to route calls from an online number, which I purchased on Twilio, creating a voice menu for the number and then routing the call to the relevant person based on what the caller selects. It took me less than an hour to achieve this.

Enterprises now have a plethora of collaboration and communication services to meet diversified and changing needs and requirements of the modern workforce with the goal to increase productivity and keep the focus on business instead of managing the infrastructure. Unifying all these collaboration and communication services deployed in-house for employees and external customer care services not only improves employee collaboration and customer care but also addresses the changing workplace with small teams placed remotely and home based or mobile employees. Solutions served out of the Cloud give enterprises, small and big, the opportunity to deploy UC (Unified Communication) and extract all the benefits which comes with this strategy while at the same time cut down on IT cost, both in terms of the spend on infrastructure and its management.

Frost & Sullivan has announced an eBroadcast featuring talks from Cloud communication industry experts. This eBroadcast will give you an update on the Cloud UC (Unified Communications) and external customer care markets. It will also discuss some of the benefits of cloud communications and will recommend strategies for selecting the right cloud solution and provider.

To register, visit this page.

By Salam UI Haq

Tech Experts Advise Canada To Stop Playing Second Fiddle To The Spying Issue On Its Cloud

Tech Experts Advise Canada to Stop Playing Second Fiddle to the Spying Issue on Its Cloud

Since early last decade, 2001 to be exact, following the terrorist attacks on US soil, the Canadian cloud scene has seen the laws that followed the disaster play out against it. According to a recent cloud conference in Ottawa that had in attendance among others the world’s leading search company, it has emerged that the North American country is playing second fiddle, too much, to the US data spy bill. This is because companies in Canada feel that, since they use most of their compute service from the superpower down south, they are under its very talons of privacy infiltration.

Forget the Laws and move on

The 2001 bill that extended the ability of the United States to monitor data by its citizens abroad and, later, to users of its tech companies’ services, has been the center of this issue. It is for this reason that a tech expert in a Canadian American Business Council’s meeting, advised local companies, especially in the private sector, to forget about the Bill, however illegitimate, and go ahead.

The expert touted that while the companies in this country lag behind chewing the bone of espionage concerns, the rest of the world is making headway. He also explained that change is indispensible at such a time that the world cannot do without the cost-efficient, pay-as-you-use, phenomenon. Indeed, the world’s major providers of cloud services charge very little per each utility of services, including storage and hosting, in comparison with a firm establishing its own data facility.

The Canadian scheme is especially inspiring because of its proximity to the globe’s tech epicenter, and for that matter, compute services, the US. Most of the web-based mail, storage, innovation, and app-developer companies are all down across the Great Lakes region. This is why analysts are saying that the faster the Canadians left the scourge of spying behind and prioritized on associations and development, the better it will become for them.

Cloud Proliferation Everywhere

From the banking sector to higher education, and from government to the private sector, cloud computing is in the midst of every business in Canada, if not the rest of the planet. The rising demand for cloud services has shot beyond earlier surmises, from the fact that states can reduce their running expenses and so do private companies that seek efficient delivery of their data output. To make the outreach between end-users and tech giants greater than it is now, it has emerged that the providers are carving out new niches in which to clinch deals before their rivals do so. This is why in, Australia, for example, tech multinationals are already advising the state to embrace a national cloud framework, so that they can step in and prioritize on delivering a unique cloud ecosystem. This follows the announcement by the country that it has inched a step closer to fully embracing the sector in its existing ICT framework.

The most recent occurrence that led to further spy complications, is when the United States, in February 2013, said that it could track down, legally, all data that is under storage by any of its home service providers, regionally and offshore. It is upon this issue and similar others, that experts counsel on forgetting and moving on, because the law is not easy to review. Meanwhile, the administration in Canada has its in-house compute services, though only to a certain limit, for its HR and economical data niches. This ensures that it does not have to bear espionage suspicions all the time.

By John Omwamba

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

Four Tips For Integrating Mobile Cloud Applications Into Your Treasury Department

The global enterprise mobility market is expanding at a rapid rate – predicted to bring in $140 billion a year by 2020. As the market continues to expand, so do the varying needs of mobile businesses who rely on cloud-based solutions. For mobile employees, having full product functionality at their fingertips is critical, and cloud-based services enable a much more efficient solution than legacy apps.

However, companies shouldn’t assume that “mobile” equates to “road warrior.” Employees that are primarily office-based also find value in access to data on mobile devices. Applications that provide access to specific, critical pieces of time-sensitive data are a value-add for treasury.

One example is the corporate treasurer, who is mainly in-office and benefits from a consolidated treasury management system for cash management, payments, and treasury transactions. There are times when treasurers can’t access their desktops or laptops. In fact, recent data revealed more than 66 percent of finance professionals process cash flow transactions from their mobile devices. Even though they don’t need access to every piece of information in the system, they will have urgent tasks, such as approving an urgent payment, or viewing a key report that requires instant response. In these instances, a mobile application that extends the necessary functionality from their existing treasury system is a quick and easy solution to meet their needs. It pulls core data from the cloud, without the need for a complex interface or large amounts of processing power.

Not surprisingly, the same requirements are just as important to everyone in the treasury team. That is why, when evaluating treasury technology, organizations are seeking cloud providers that offer a mobile application to extend a system’s core functions directly to employees’ mobile devices, addressing the on-demand needs of the treasury team.

The consumerization of IT is a driving factor behind mobile app adoption within the enterprise, and has impacted almost every line of business. Given the sensitive financial data that corporate treasurers access on a daily basis, it’s critical they take precautions when integrating mobile applications into their daily routine. To ensure sensitive information remains safe and secure, below are four tips organizations should consider when launching mobile applications specifically aimed at streamlining the role of a corporate treasurer:

Identify core needs: At the recent 2013 Hosting and Cloud Transformation Summit, 451 Research chief analyst Eric Hanselman noted that “enterprise IT risks being left in the dust” if they don’t speed up their adoption of cloud computing. While this is true, it is also critical that organizations don’t dive headfirst into mobile cloud adoption when dealing with the treasury department, where executives leverage mobile applications to tap into sensitive financial information. Enterprise IT must first identify the key needs of the corporate treasurer, which are very different than the requirements of a road warrior. They rarely require all the bells and whistles that some mobile applications provide. Rather, they need a solution that extends core treasury management functionality to their mobile device. This empowers them to make informed, time-sensitive financial decisions on the go.

Focus on security: Security is a top concern when it comes to mobile cloud computing. This should be at the top of an organization’s checklist when approving mobile cloud applications for any line of business, including the corporate treasury department. The good news is cloud-based software is now trusted in business-critical environments by many large enterprise and government agencies. When evaluating applications for the treasury department, an organization needs to make sure its solution adheres to the latest and most rigorous security standards to ensure its data is completely secure.

Cost: Treasury teams do not have unlimited budgets, so mobile solutions must be cost-effective. This almost always rules out in-house developed or internally hosted/supported software applications with custom designed mobile access. Mobile access must be native to the application and not require customization to put in the hands of the treasury team.

Ease of Use: While most employees leverage mobile applications in their daily lives, this does not mean they will know how to navigate all applications introduced into the business. It is critical that mobile applications improve ease of use and are as intuitive as any mobile application that one would download from the cloud.

In summary, as more organizations deploy cloud-based solutions to mobilize their workforce, the treasury department should not be left out simply because they don’t frequently travel for business. Cloud-based services and mobile applications bring numerous benefits to the treasurer. If implemented correctly, extending the core functionality of a cloud-based treasury management system to the mobile environment can streamline processes and increase efficiency.

bob-stark_smallBy Bob Stark

Bob Stark is responsible for global product and marketing strategy at Kyriba, with a focus on thought leadership, product positioning, and market development. Bob is involved in a variety of strategic initiatives including risk and hedging compliance, eBAM, supply chain finance, SWIFT connectivity, and global business alliances.  Bob is a 15-year veteran of the treasury technology industry, with a particular focus on treasury management systems. He has previously held strategic roles at WallStreet Systems, Thomson Reuters, and Selkirk Financial Technologies. 

He is a regular guest speaker at treasury conferences and is an active member of the Association for Financial Professionals.

PSAs For The Cloud

PSAs For The Cloud

PSAs for the Cloud 

I am going to need you to turn on Arms of an Angel, by Sarah McLachlan, that you have stored on your cloud as you read this article.  It will just set the mood.

Storm Cloud

1) The Weather

The concern for your safety when it comes to dangerous times is something to never take lightly. As the saying goes, “When it rains, it pours.” Hello, I am that kid who is severely younger than you, much more sarcastic than you care for, and knows way more about technology than you ever will. The ironic part being I have only been alive for fourteen years. When it comes to cloud computing there are a number of people who just are sooooo smart. A study asked many people how they think rain would interact with cloud computing here. Now it may be excusable to confuse the cloud with a name brand, but there are sooooo many out there that think the rain is going to disrupt the cloud network from function.  That is why I am here to roll my eyes at you and say, “Cloud computing does not use real clouds in the sky to store your pictures of your cat. Please if you know someone who turns off all their devices because it is raining outside send them to the closest IT personnel so they can have a little joy in their otherwise painful, “I just downloaded a free screensaver of Dilbert on my company laptop and now it won’t start,” life.

2) Eggs in a Basket

A common misconception in our daily lives comes from the age old proverb, “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” Being that you might lose everything in one swift action. Hello, I am disgraced celebrity that is trying to make a comeback after being caught driving under the influence and fighting a police officer for a candy bar. With cloud computing you can put all your eggs in one basket, and feel safe about it.  You no longer must have your music on just your MP3 player and your pictures on your camera, those days will no longer haunt you. Now you can put all your files, music, pictures, and more into one basket, the cloud basket.  This way we can share everything in one place and never be scared of losing it all because of carelessness.  If only I thought of using the cloud instead of fumbling with my MP3 player while taking a self picture of myself when I was driving my convertible on the wrong side of the road going 110 mph I wouldn’t have to be here. So thank you cloud computing and that is what you need to know.

3) Passwords need a Top Shelf Number

Life can become a dangerous place for the best of times and the worst of times.  Criminals are lurking on the streets thinking of clever ways to steal, kill, and destroy your online identity. Hello I am that famous children’s actor that tours around the world singing pointless songs that your children have begun singing the second they saw me in this commercial. In this perilous time you can only trust yourself… with your cloud security. All there is between you and the thief that wants all your Ace of Base albums is a simple collection of key strokes, then pretty soon it won’t be just you with open eyes who saw the sign. So remember boys and girls keep your password out of the reach from bad guys with keyboards by adding a number to your password from the top shelf. Also, don’t forget boys and girls if your parents won’t pay the ticket price to see me in person then they clearly don’t love you.

4) Mobile Lifestyle

Your life is on the go and you don’t have time to slow down, kids had to wait, marriage had to wait, even your birthday has to wait for you to get off the phone while crunching numbers on your tablet. Hello I am ex-triathlon winner and balding sports legend coming to you to speak about the important of mobile connections. When I was in the middle of the swimming sections I could only think of how life is going by too fast and that I might be missing out on something on the land.  So once I broke the world record for swimming I realized that sometime I get ahead of myself and I need to slow down and spend some time with the ones I love.  Luckily with cloud computing I can slow down and play with my children because with the cloud I can take a picture of my girls soccer game and send it straight to my computer for granddad to see. I am always on the go but with the cloud now I don’t have to worry about my kids thinking I don’t love them anymore.

Some poor soul, somewhere, at sometime, is using cloud computing as we speak and they have no idea they are or what cloud computing is. Would you be an angel and take the time to share Cloudtweaks with them?

By Chris Kenealy

[Images: Shutterstock]

Cloud Growing Pains – Failure Is Inevitable

Cloud Growing Pains – Failure Is Inevitable

Growing up with floppy disks as the standard for storage was not pretty, my school days were filled with corrupt assignments and missing files because the things were very fragile and tended to fail at the slightest sign of an electrical field. And there was no use bringing a backup floppy disk because chances are that would fail too. Not to mention random crashes on very slow computers and you quickly learn to save fast and save often, then keep lots and lots of backup. Now fast forward decades later and we have cheaper and faster computers, reliable flash storage, the internet, and even the Cloud. We do not even need to carry our data with us physically because of online file storage services.

But some things never change, and that is failure and all of its forms. It seems to be looming in every corner, and there is no escape, not for any technology. So the core best practice that any business trying to make it in the Cloud could have, is to expect failure and plan for it. After all, each node whether a server, hard drive or networking equipment consists of mass produced commodity hardware parts that may or may not last years. All Cloud service providers architect and design their systems so that when one or several pieces of equipment fail, the system or environment should be able to recover automatically.

Elasticity and fault tolerance actually go hand in hand. Elasticity requires bootstrapping just like fault tolerance. And the reason to bootstrap may be to meet additional demand (elasticity), or sometimes to replace a box which is having problems (fault tolerance). So basically when a new box is required, one boots and is given orders and then it finds and installs required resources to become what piece of equipment it needs to be. This should happen especially when others start failing.

Even though, the Cloud provider has architected his systems to be elastic and fault tolerant, does not mean that your existing software that you are bringing to the Cloud becomes elastic and Fault tolerant as well. If you want to move to the Cloud you have to architect your application to make full use of the advantage of fault tolerance and elasticity provided by the Cloud. Moving unoptimized spaghetti code to the Cloud is just asking for trouble, just like migrating a set of tightly coupled objects. The Cloud is forcing developers to architect their applications to work and take advantage of the elastic and fault-tolerant nature of the Cloud. And you do not just plan for failure within the Cloud but of the Cloud itself. But it is a fool’s errand to count on a single provider. You should consider using many different providers as elements in your vast enterprise. This also takes care of elasticity and fault tolerance, by removing any single point of failure.

By Abdul Salam

Cloud ERP In Manufacturing: Why Join The Movement?

Cloud ERP in Manufacturing: Why Join The Movement?

The manufacturing sector of the economy was an early user of ERP systems when the software first emerged, but surprisingly, most manufacturers have been slow to adopt cloud ERP. By 2010, only about 5% of manufacturing companies were using cloud ERP. One reason for this slow adoption is that many ERP providers were slow at developing the solutions that manufacturers needed. Although numerous retail and wholesale companies, as well as service firms, have adopted cloud ERP, manufacturing companies have an extra layer of complexity: Myriad functionality needs and different design considerations which necessitate more specialized solutions.

Manufacturers have other concerns about moving to the cloud. Despite the fact that they are more likely to be hacked on their in-house solution, they worry about the security of their data in the cloud. Cloud providers have attempted to alleviate these concerns by offering security certifications that guarantee the privacy and security of company information. There is also concern about the performance and uptime capabilities of cloud options, but today, many providers are offering service level agreements of 99% uptime.

These concerns aside, cloud ERP offers manufacturers numerous advantages. With cloud services, manufacturers don’t have to perform their own back-ups, patches, or upgrades. Often, the total cost of ownership is lower than on-premises solutions since companies do not need to purchase and maintain complicated equipment or keep dedicated IT staff on hand. Many ERP vendors offer more reliable tech support than what companies can have in-house.

Cloud ERP also offers the flexibility that many manufacturers need, allowing sales reps to access real-time information globally and employees on the manufacturing floor to keep track of data with tablets. It offers the potential to coordinate just about every aspect of a manufacturing environment so that different departments can work together more seamlessly and effortlessly. Cloud ERP can be particularly helpful in the distribution process since it lets companies open a new distribution center and bring it online quickly. If your business has different locations, cloud ERP can help you manage your distribution resources across many locations.

Cloud ERP is particularly beneficial for small and mid-sized businesses, many of which have been relying on smaller financial packages and spreadsheets to keep track of data because the cost of an ERP system had been prohibitive. Many small businesses are discovering that ERP is affordable and they are becoming aware of the advantages it offers. A recent survey by IDC Insights discovered that 25% of small businesses are implementing cloud ERP and another 20% are considering a move to the cloud.

In the past, R&D, sales people, workers on the shop floor, accounting, and human resources were on their own little islands. Each group would have a small data set that was part of a larger picture. Since reports were run on different systems, each report would get a different result. With ERP, you can have a common language because everyone is using the same information. Cloud ERP provides visibility across all sectors of an organization, from the manufacturing floor to sales and even suppliers, which is a huge advantage. Real-time data gathering allows for more informed decision making; in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, manufacturers need every advantage they can get.

Another advantage cloud ERP offers: It can be used anywhere. Consider a company that buys smaller businesses worldwide. When they add a new company, they can simply say, “Here is our company network, just plug in.” There is no need for vendor resources to be on site. Cloud ERP makes the process much simpler and accelerates the speed to market so they can be more competitive. This business model could be used worldwide.

Cloud ERP has the potential to transform the way companies do business, from manufacturing and distribution to sales. It has the capability to level the playing field between small and midsize businesses and their larger competitors. If your company is not already part of the 45% of companies implementing or investigating cloud ERP, it may be in your best interest to check it out.

By John Schlemmer,

John Schlemmer has over 30 years of experience in the sales and marketing of Manufacturing ERP and Supply Chain Execution software; marketing these technology products and services to high-growth, emerging, mature and competitive enterprises. His specialty is in building and managing sales organizations; both direct and through channel organizations. He has held sales and management positions for a variety of software companies which has given him both industry expertise as well as extensive knowledge of available solutions in the marketplace. He is currently Vice President of Sales and Marketing at JAAS Systems, an Acumatica Cloud ERP ISV.

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

Is Performance Still An Issue In The Cloud?

The initial promise of cloud generated a lot of excitement particularly in the test and development worlds. It was easy to use and just as easy to dismiss. Although that gave way to disappointment as early adopters discovered most if not all of the familiar old problems around administration, networks and performance applied to the cloud as much as dedicated. With most first generation cloud platforms adopting iSCI-based storage platforms, performance particularly stood out as an issue, and it became accepted opinion that cloud could never outpace dedicated equipment. Is that still the case? A third party benchmark test on seven leading cloud platforms using a dedicated server sheds some interesting light on the discussion

As cloud moves from being a bleeding edge technology to a more common place service tool, it’s still common to find IT professionals assuming that cloud performance simply cannot match up to that of dedicated hardware. Early experiences with cloud platforms have left many with sub-optimal experiences, and there is a widespread view in the market that high IOPS applications are best left in-house.

Are your four cores the same as mine?

To understand the origins of this belief, remember that the cloud was created as a tool for testing and development. As its adoption spread, and excitement over its potential grew, developers and then businesses put more and more demands on their cloud environments.

This led to a natural, if not unfortunate, dynamic at the commodity end of the market. With a focus on expanding profit margins and controlling expenditures, many businesses decided to trim costs around the biggest single expense of a cloud platform — the back end. The short-sighted decision to save money by using cheap storage systems led predictably to subpar performance – which in turn led to some of the more publicized outages in recent years.

Another factor is a lack of standardization. A recent study that benchmarked the performance of major players in the IaaS space discovered a wide variance in specifications. For example, with a common instance type of 4 cores/16GB, the variance between one provider and another can be as much as 50 percent. This means some specifications can be misleading to the point of being meaningless. If one platform performs at only 50 percent rate of its neighbor, then twice as many resources must be provisioned.

In another example of unreliability, commodity cloud players with iSCI in the back end have an ethernet hop in their infrastructure that inevitably slows down performance. As a result, applications that require high IOPS don’t function smoothly on those platforms. This results in the classic trade-off of price versus performance.

All of which means, that potential buyers must do thorough research on cloud platforms to understand what they will actually deliver. A detailed analysis of a platform’s technologies is essential before making a sizeable investment. It’s a pity that so few cloud providers share the details of their infrastructure with end users, or allow them to audit their platforms. While commercial secrets may be kept and embarrassing details hid, it means that IT providers have to use the rumor mill to make decisions about where they host their applications.

You get what you pay for

Given the background of some cloud performance issues, some IT pros might be surprised to hear that cloud platforms can outperform dedicated servers. But they can – and there’s even third party data proving that shared technologies can compete with and even outclass dedicated hardware. The platforms simply have to be built with performance in mind and managed correctly.  Of course its still true that with several platforms, if performance is an issue, using dedicated can be the better option. But why don’t all cloud providers offer competitive performance?

The answer is roadblocks. The two most common obstacles work in tandem — expense and the relentless race to the bottom. When providers like Amazon and Google  prioritize offering low-cost services, they must cut costs elsewhere to enable those offerings – and those cuts often mean a failure to invest in the proven technologies needed to provide high performance. As a result, users eager to find an economical platform will often experience weak performance.

To “re-brand” cloud environments as reliable, speedy and secure, providers must invest the capital necessary to build an optimal, high-quality platform. Only then will they deliver the performance their customers deserve. This puts cloud providers who have already built out low cost storage in a bind. Should they rip out their existing infrastructure and replace what they have with high-end technologies such as fibre channel? The disruption is prohibitive and the cost would surely have to be passed onto the user. When a customer can leave with little or no notice, it would risk the business. So it is unlikely that we will see a wholesale rebuild of a platform any time soon.

Is it game over for dedicated?

Inevitably there will be applications that do not run well in the cloud. For instance, some proprietary big data applications more or less have to be run on dedicated servers. Customers like to stick with habits and suppliers too, which will keep dedicated around for some time. Look at how many mainframes are still deployed. But for the most part, the choice is obvious. Just take a look at the latest round of financial results from hosting providers. The numbers paint a picture of a flat or barely growing dedicated hosting customer base and revenues. Meanwhile cloud revenues and momentum grow inexorably.

By Daniel Beazer

Daniel Beazer has an extensive history of research and strategy with hosting and cloud organizations.  As director of strategy at FireHost, Daniel Beazer oversees interactions with enterprise and strategic customers. In this role, he identifies pain points that are unique to high-level customers and utilises his significant knowledge of cloud computing and hosting to help them. 

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Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Beacons Flopped, But They’re About to Flourish in the Future

Cloud Beacons Flying High When Apple debuted cloud beacons in 2013, analysts predicted 250 million devices capable of serving as iBeacons would be found in the wild within weeks. A few months later, estimates put the figure at just 64,000, with 15 percent confined to Apple stores. Beacons didn’t proliferate as expected, but a few…

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Three Challenges of Network Deployment in Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Private Cloud

Hyperconverged Infrastructure In this article, we’ll explore three challenges that are associated with network deployment in a hyperconverged private cloud environment, and then we’ll consider several methods to overcome those challenges. The Main Challenge: Bring Your Own (Physical) Network Some of the main challenges of deploying a hyperconverged infrastructure software solution in a data center are the diverse physical…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

ERP Deployment You know how ERP deployment can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and more popular, it is worth…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…