Category Archives: Security

BYOD: Good or Bad?

BYOD: Good or Bad?

BYOD: Good or Bad?


The Bring your own device or BYOD trend being touted by cloud computing as one of its most attractive features is actually causing concern to a lot of IT officers because of the inherent problems brought to the table by allowing company data resources off the premises. One of the biggest problems that can be encountered would be data loss or information leakage. These are the same repercussions as losing a company laptop a few years ago the potential for disaster because of losing vital company secrets is extremely high.

AccelOps Cloud Security Survey Report surveyed some 176 IT security personnel and they ranked BYOD as the top source for fear of incurring data loss and having the need for heightened data control. This is the traditional topic or cloud worriers and opponents of cloud computing which only helps in propagating the myth that cloud computing in not secure. ISC2’s January research shows that explicitly linked cloud computing to the creation of personal device policies. But the take away from the research is that companies who support BYOD have happier employees while also needing to increase their cloud security knowledge and skills. The same research survey shows that 78% of the participants consider BYOD as a “somewhat or very significant risk”.

While BYOD is certainly a highly appealing way to do things for the employee, it becomes rather a pain for employers. Part of this is because there is no proper standard in creating BYOD policies, and each company has to stumble and learn from their own mistakes, because as with all new things, few have explored it to catalogue best practices and create ad-hoc standard policies. When learning from other’s mistakes is not pretty much an option yet, companies have to become smart when approaching this nice little feature.

My two cents on the matter is that BYOD policies should be based around data control and logon security. Little to no data should be stored within mobile devices themselves that may be retrievable by those that get their hands on the device. If this is the case, data thieves have to login to the account on the stolen devices which makes it just a tad harder. This is where logon security comes into play. Multi- tier verification should be the way to go because common username-passwords can easily be stolen or even guessed. There should be further user authentication and verification, probably along the lines of facial or voice recognition or other forms of multi-tier verification devices.

By Abdul Salam

Is Cloud Computing Experiencing The Same Security Threats As Enterprise Computing?

Is Cloud Computing Experiencing The Same Security Threats As Enterprise Computing?

Is Cloud Computing Experiencing the Same Security Threats as Enterprise Computing?

People have always feared that cloud computing is inherently lacking in security because of the distribution methods used, allowing it to be more public than necessary. But research and reports indicate that it is not less secure than enterprise computing as they actually both suffer from the same types of attack. And it does not matter if you are a small organization or a large one you will still be the target of cyber-attacks as most of them are opportunistic in threats report

While organizations and businesses are the target of online attacks, the real entryways for these attacks are unsecured personal computers. These form the backbone of the cyber-criminal’s arsenal. Hijacked computers referred to as zombies or bots are being used to make brute force attacks on different networks both within the cloud infrastructure and on-premise infrastructure. No one is actually safe, whatever kind of infrastructure that they are using. Others might be more privy to attacks due to the nature of their service like banks or the possible wealth of information that they bring, like government networks and industry leaders in technology research.

According to Alert Logic’s Fall 2012 State of the Cloud Security Report, the variations in the threat activity across the industry is not as important as where the infrastructure is located. Attacks are not industry specific or organizational size specific, they depend on the infrastructure. This means that anything that can be possibly accessed from outside, whether enterprise or cloud, has equal chances of being attacked because as mentioned, attacks are opportunistic in nature.

The reason why cyber-attacks are indiscriminate to industry and size would be due to the nature of the attacker’s weapon, the internet. Web application-based attacks hit both service provider environments (53% of organizations) and on-premise environments (44% of organizations). But as a plus for cloud computing’s side, on-premise environment users or customers actually suffer more incidents than those of service provider environments. On-premise environment users experience an average of 61.4 attacks while service provider environment customers averaged only with 27.8 while on-premise environment users also suffered significantly more brute force attacks compared to their counterparts.

Despite real research and facts being provided by security service providers like Alert Logic, many organizations still base their infrastructure decisions on the “myth” that cloud computing is inherently less secure compared to enterprise computing or on-premise services. But instead of focusing their attention to these perceptions, organizations should be focusing on leveraging factual data to evaluate their own vulnerabilities and then create a better plan for their security.

By Abdul Salam

Risks Involved In Adopting BYOD

Risks Involved In Adopting BYOD

Risks Involved in Adopting BYOD

Imagine a workplace scenario where every employee has his/her own mobile device to access company data and applications. This way, people get their work done using their own devices in the office. Briefly, this is what Bring Your Own Device or BYOD is all about. All over the world, companies are opening up to this new trend and there are mixed reviews about its usefulness.


While some say it makes employees more productive, others are more concerned about the risks involved. Irrespective of all this, BYOD has become quite popular in business circles as well as in schools and colleges.

The Reason behind BYOD Growth

Smartphones, tablets, phablets and other mobile devices have made deep inroads with today’s generation of Internet users. Tech-savvy individuals have more than one device that they use for work or pleasure. It comes as no surprise that people started getting these devices to office with them. It was only a matter of time before employees started doing their work through such gadgets.

The growth of Wi-Fi networks is another reason why BYOD has grown so rapidly in the past few years. It doesn’t look like slowing down anytime soon as companies welcome employees who prefer working on their personal devices.

The flipside of this trend is that there are quite a few risks involved.

Unreliable third-party apps:

Many people download such apps and use them on a regular basis. When the same device is brought into contact with a professional network, then the risk of hacking arises. Many third-party apps might be already infected with malware that could harm the proper working of the device. On a bigger scale, it could infiltrate the company network and start creating serious issues.

One way to mitigate this problem is by installing security apps on all the employee devices. This can be a pain, as regular updates need to be downloaded.

Data management and segregation issues:

When employees get their devices to work, questions about access begin to pop up. Should everyone be given permission to view all kinds of files? Obviously not. In a business setting, certain employees will need more access than others will.

When BYOD is in play, it becomes tough for IT departments to segregate data for each employee. This becomes another headache for the company to deal with.

Stolen devices:

Since mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are smaller, the risk of losing them is much higher. According to McAfee, over 30% of individuals fail to set up password protection on their mobile devices. This means that loss or theft could result in a security breach.

If an employee has sensitive company information on his/her tablet or smartphone, then the loss of it could result in bigger problems for the company. This is where BYOD is not such a good idea.

Tracking data difficulties:

The use of cloud services by employees means that data can be moving from one place to another. This becomes a major issue when the company cannot keep track of where all its data is being moved or used.

Hiring a separate company to track data does not always serve the purpose. Employees too can stray from the set guidelines for data movement and this is when additional risks begin to creep in.

Revengeful ex-employees:

If a company has recently fired an employee, then he/she may try to take revenge by leaking important data to public sources. This is something that a company might trick on to after the damage is done.

Sometimes, employees may just forget to inform the HR department that they have a mobile device containing company information. In both cases, chances of leaks are quite high.

Employee expenses:

While this doesn’t usually happen, it can become a problem once BYOD becomes a common occurrence. Certain employees might use their corporate accounts and purchase apps for their personal use.

This means that the company will be footing the bill for an employee’s shopping spree.

For those companies that are thinking of adopting a BYOD approach, strict guidelines need to be set down. Before employees are allowed to bring their own devices to work, a solid security framework should be set up in order to protect company data.

By Sasha Joyner,

Sasha Joyner is a technology enthusiast who is fond of writing helpful tips and fresh tidbits of information about the different fields in technology and innovation. She is currently working with Telco Services

Virtualization: Benefit From The Online VMware Forum 2013

Virtualization: Benefit From The Online VMware Forum 2013

Virtualization: Benefit From The Online VMware Forum 2013


We live in a cynical world, hard-wired to suspect anything that is offered for free. However, one thing that you should never balk at is free education. And if that education is in the hottest area in Information Technology (IT) – virtualization – you shouldn’t just be enthusiastic about it, you should literally be running to the location.

What’s so great about virtualization, you say? Well, let’s look at some of its benefits, shall we?

  1. Virtualization can help save companies money through optimum use of IT resources by consolidating and reallocating them based on utilization and capacity. In contrast, traditional IT paradigms are inflexible and cannot respond to changing demands, thereby creating inefficiencies.

  1. Virtualization can make employees more productive by providing employees a uniform interface independent of underlying infrastructure. Also, with virtualization, they can work remotely or on the move using a multitude of devices.

  1. Virtualization can help companies recover from disasters by disassociating from any specific technology site that may be impacted.

  1. Virtualization can make confidential information more secure through layered security where, for every category of threat, there is an effective control deployed to mitigate the threat. With legacy systems, security is unidirectional, and hence, incomplete.

  1. Virtualization can make companies greener, because optimum resource usage leads to lower energy consumption and a smaller carbon footprint.

Thankfully, in order to learn about virtualization, you don’t need to even move from your desk. With a few clicks of the mouse and taps of the keyboard, you can register for Online VMware Forum 2013. Here, you can

  • chat and make connections with VMware experts and your IT peers

  • learn about the software-defined data center and new VMware offerings

  • attend live breakout sessions, technical deep dives and discussions

  • navigate in a 3D virtual environment with interactive booths staffed by VMware industry-leading partners

…..and all this, from the comfort of your desk. And for FREE! So, what are you waiting for?

By Sourya Biswas

Sponsored by VMware and Online VMware Forum 2013

How Hosted PBX Can Enhance Cloud Security

How Hosted PBX can enhance Cloud Security

Cloud security has become a critical job responsibility for a majority of North American IT professionals.  In its recent survey, AccelOps, Inc., a leader in integrated Security Information and Event Management (SIEM), performance and availability monitoring software, interviewed 176 IT security professionals.  One of the key findings was that responsibility for cloud security rests overwhelmingly (78%) with businesses’ internal IT staff.
Hosted PBX phone service can enhance overall cloud security while lessening the already significant load on IT personnel.  (Read The Full Cloud Security Survey Report)

Here’s how moving your phone service to the cloud can help.

1.      Electronic invoice delivery.  Invoices are stored in an SSL-secured web portal, and you can also choose to have them delivered via e-mail.  This means no more printed bills and conspicuous envelopes left at doors or on desks.
2.      Similarly, faxes are archived via the portal, and can also be delivered to specified e-mail addresses – in contrast to printed faxes with potentially sensitive data being left on a fax machine.
3.      Administrators can set web portal access levels on a per-user basis, ensuring that only appropriate personnel can manage powerful high-level functions.
4.      International calling capabilities are highly adjustable.  Administrators can enable or disable international calls on a per-extension basis, and can also set an overall spending limit for international calling in any given month.  These safeguards can help prevent potentially costly unauthorized calls to overseas numbers.
5.      Users with administrator-level access can remotely disable a phone from using the cloud PBX service.  For example, if an employee leaves the company and doesn’t return the hardware, his or her phone can be disabled remotely to prevent unauthorized calls.
6.      Tracking phone usage is easy.  Web portals provide managers with up-to-the-minute call records with options to filter by date, staff extension numbers, and call type.  Exporting records to spreadsheet format is quick and simple.
7.      Monitoring calls for quality, compliance or training purposes (such as assisting new staff members during live calls) is a snap with the silent monitoring feature.
8.      Where greater call transparency is needed, a Hosted PBX provider can record all calls and deliver the recordings to a secure cloud-based storage service.
9.      Call centers can leverage the power of a Virtual Call Center package, which provides even more robust tracking and accountability metrics.
10.    Premium cloud PBX providers build their service on a robust back-end network, including Tier 4 datacenters with strictly controlled access, 24/7 monitoring and onsite support staff.
11.     All individual servers are protected by industry-leading encryption to further enhance security.

By Adam Simpson

Adam Simpson is Founder and CEO of Easy Office Phone. Established in 2005, Easy Office Phone provides Business VoIP and Hosted PBX service to companies and organizations of all sizes throughout North America.

The 5-3-2 Principle Of Cloud Computing: An Easier Approach

The 5-3-2 Principle Of Cloud Computing: An Easier Approach

The 5-3-2 Principle of Cloud Computing: An Easier Approach

Even though, cloud computing has become exceedingly common, the fact remains that people seem to have differing opinions when it comes to its definition. The issue is not the lack of definition or the lack of an agreed coherent one, but rather the lack of apparent direction. Cloud computing is an extremely large topic, but it is being used in very specific ways. In the same vein that makes it hard for people to stay on the same page when talking about general computing without agreeing to something specific, people need to be specific when they talk about cloud computing. This is because it encompasses infrastructure, architecture, deployment, applications, development, automatiYung - 5-3-2 Principle Of Cloud Computingon, operations, management, optimization and a dozen other topics that are equally beneficial and all would be a valid topic when referring to cloud computing.

Because of this inherent confusion with regards to conversation structuring, Yung Chou, a Technology Evangelist of the Microsoft US Developer and Platform Evangelism Team, devised an easy to remember principle that we can all agree on and use as a proper base when discussing cloud computing. The principle is called the “5-3- 2 Principle” and refers to the five essential characteristics of cloud computing, the three cloud service delivery methods, and the two deployment models which when put together properly describes what cloud computing is.

First up is he “5 Essential Characteristics of Cloud Computing”: On-demand and self-service, ubiquitous network access, location transparent resource pooling, rapid elasticity, and measured service with pay per use. The characteristics were defined by the National Institute of Standards and technology (NIST) as part of their “Definition of Cloud Computing” publication, and they mostly speak for themselves as far as what each means at first glance. This publication is also where the principle is derived from. These five characteristics are all required for something to be qualified as cloud computing, according to NIST.

The 3 stands for the three service delivery methods, namely: Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure (IaaS). All services being offered using cloud computing would fall under one or more of the above delivery methods, whether it be office applications and games (SaaS) or cloud backup storage or computing resources (IaaS). It becomes easier to define whether the service you are using is really of cloud computing or not just by judging if it is being delivered through one of the above methods.

And lastly, we have the two main deployment models of cloud computing: The Private and the Public Cloud models. NIST lists down four deployment models, but the other two is really just either a combination or a derivative of these two main ones. The public cloud is meant for public consumption while a private cloud’s infrastructure is dedicated for private use, like in large corporations or government agencies.

The 5-3-2 Principle is a new, simple, and structured way to approach cloud computing whether it is for simple conversations between colleagues or for educating people on what cloud computing truly is. The structure for using the principle in discussions is straightforward, validate business needs starting with the 5 characteristics, then go into the feasibility of delivering the intended service or function with the 3 delivery methods, the finally end with which deployment model would be more preferred in the situation.

By Abdul Salam

7 Essentials Of Hybrid Cloud Backup

7 Essentials Of Hybrid Cloud Backup

7 Essentials of Hybrid Cloud Backup

Understanding the Cloud Options

A hybrid cloud solution combines private (internal/on-premise) and public (external) cloud deployment models.

With a typical private cloud solution, one would build, develop and manage their own cloud infrastructure. The most common deployments of private cloud solutions are in enterprise-level environments. Businesses that have the capital to fund a private cloud operation will usually purchase the necessary equipment, hire their own dedicated IT support teams, and build or lease their own data centers. This allows the company to have complete control over their cloud environment. The primary downside of a private cloud is that it is very expensive to implement and maintain. It also requires highly skilled engineers to manage the network.

In a public cloud scenario, one utilizes web-based applications and services. Hardware or software is not owned or maintained by the client, and resources are completely acquired from third party
vendors. Google Apps, Salesforce, and Amazon Web services are all common examples of public clouds. With these deployments, end-users will work strictly through the Internet via web-based portals. Generally, application data is not stored locally. All relevant information is stored through the cloud provider.

While these solutions are cost-effective, the lack of control of data center resources, monthly fees, and increased support costs can hinder the viability that a public cloud will align with every business. The fact that business critical data is stored only offsite can also be disconcerting for businesses. One must also consider the possibility that the cloud provider could go out of business, experience a service outage, be acquired by another company, or suffer a security breach. Any of these scenarios could spell disaster for a business’

With a hybrid cloud model, aspects of both platforms are merged to form a single, unified platform. A business owns some form of local hardware, which is integrated with resources owned by a third party. Depending on what attributes of the business are being pushed to the cloud, there are many options for how a hybrid cloud platform can be constructed.

What is Hybrid Cloud Backup?

In the context of data backup, a combination of private and public backup solutions can be used to form an efficient and robust platform. Hybrid cloud vendors use their expertise to engineer enterprise-grade backup solutions that can be affordable for businesses of any size.

On the private cloud side, an end-user would have a local device that acts as a NAS (Network-Attached Storage) unit backing up data locally, while concurrently pushing data off-site to a secure, third party cloud. What sets these units apart from a typical NAS unit is that they also apply complex data deduplication, compression, file conversion, and other processes which are unique to each vendor. These processes help reduce storage space on local devices and off-site servers, keep local bandwidth reduction at a minimum, and optimize the backup process to make data recovery as efficient and quick as possible, both locally and in the cloud.

The public cloud side is comprised of the data center infrastructure developed by the cloud provider. Mirrored backup images from local backup devices are stored and archived in proprietary data centers, so they can be accessed in the event that backup records are not available locally (i.e. a disaster scenario).

Having the cloud infrastructure developed by a third party is valuable to end-users because through economies of scale, backup cloud vendors can provide space in the cloud at lower costs per GB than the average MSP could provide if they built their own cloud. This enables IT service providers and their clients to leverage cloud storage, without having to pay high monthly fees. Also, by utilizing third party technology, end-users and MSPs need not worry about maintenance of the cloud; that liability lies entirely with the vendor.

All in all, the hybrid cloud backup platform encapsulates the best of the private and public models to form a feature rich, highly efficient, and affordable system.

Hybrid Cloud Backup

1. Business Continuity

A desired benefit of most hybrid cloud backup solutions is the ability to achieve business continuity. Business continuity is a proactive way of looking at disaster preparedness. By having the proper tools and procedures in place, businesses can be assured that they will remain functional during a disaster scenario, large or small.

Business continuity, in the context of data backup, means that in the event of a disaster, cyber-attack, human error, etc., a business will never lose access to their critical data and applications. In the data backup industry, the lack of access to business critical data is referred to as downtime. Business continuity is critical to any business, because downtime can potentially bring operations to a halt while IT issues are being repaired. This can be extremely costly for any SMB to endure….

Read The Full Whitepaper

Cloud Governance: Moving Into The Cloud

Cloud Governance: Moving Into The Cloud

A lot of planning goes into a proper transition of a company’s resources to cloud computing, and it is a necessary burden that IT managers must take. And an essential part of that planning involves taking care of the system after it has made the transition, which some organizations are still fumbling with or are learning on the fly. Both should not really be treated as options.

The first thing one has to remember about cloud governance is that it should never be static; it should evolve with the environment, the market, especially with the changes in your business needs. Governance is all about taking the necessary steps and actions to ensure that your organization uses its resources and systems optimally in order to achieve its goals. But rarely do you see governance as a core matter; it usually is bumped to the lower priorities.

The best way for cloud transition is to put governance of the system and resources as a priority, and you will find that everything will fit into place. Most organizations will plan for the fastest and cheapest transition not knowing it hurts them in the long run because they are unable to make use of the systems optimally. The key here is to think ahead, align your business requirements with the cloud in mind. You have to understand that not every business process or workload can be converted to the cloud while others need to be transitioned over time to ensure that there is proper compliance to the actual requirement and prevent a lot of other data integrity and sovereignty issues.

With that in mind, make sure to look at all your tools and systems and figure which ones would really benefit you by moving them to the cloud and which ones will not make much difference, you could probably save more money and resources leaving them where they are. And most of all, focus to move your most mature solutions first in order to make sure that they perform optimally before looking at other solutions you could move as well.

Here are some governance-related questions you can ask yourself when planning for a move to the cloud:

  • Will there be changes to your existing reporting and metrics or will they need to be reevaluated and refurbished? Will the same metrics actually apply to the new cloud components? Are you able to maintain visibility of your information architecture and metadata in SharePoint across the cloud platform as a whole or with individual services and sites?
  • Are you able to track storage use and data access and to what degree? How much visibility will you have in terms of content database reports, your entire user base, as well as storage?
  • How will your compliance monitoring and auditing capability be affected? Will you still be aware of all accesses in regards to what, where, and whom?
  • How much visibility and control do you have with the interactions between your users? Is content and resources being used and shared properly, and is collaboration really achieved?
  • Will you be able to setup management procedures and policies across all systems? Will you be able to automate repetitive, responsive, and preventive tasks?

By Abdul Salam

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