Category Archives: Security

Are You Sure You Are Ready For The Cloud? SDI

Are You Sure You Are Ready For The Cloud? SDI

Software Defined Infrastructure

Well, we have come full circle with this string of subjects; about making sure you are ready for the cloud. We have talked security, storage, access, connectivity and feasibility to name a few.

Now, lets discuss SDI. What is SDI? It simply stands for “Software Defined Infrastructure”. Many people have their own versions of what that truly encompasses, but I take it at face value only. It is infrastructure built, configured and accessed through software only.


As an example, lets take a look at an OpenStack cloud. Many of you already know that OpenStack is an open source cloud management tool. It does more than that, but to find out, you should grab a copy and play with it.

So lets say we have a base installation for the cloud:

  • We have COMPUTE nodes to house our virtual server instances
  • We have INFRASTRUCTRE nodes to manage a make the functionality of the cloud work
  • We also have a CONTROL/LOGGING node to keep track of the working of the cloud.

Now with this scenario, you would think that the INFRASTRUCTRE nodes create the SDI. But they in all honestly, they only contribute. The COMPUTE nodes create the virtual server instances. In a regular datacenter, servers are hardware, so therefore they are part of the overall infrastructure.

What about routers, switches and firewalls? They too are hardware in a standard datacenter, but are a virtual instance created in the cloud. You can even have Load Balancers created virtually in the cloud, or just use its functions from the command line. And of course, they are also hardware in a standard datacenter.


What about storage? In OpenStack, you have local storage connected to the compute nodes, called “ephemeral” storage. That means the storage gets unallocated and goes away when a virtual instance is deleted. There is also block storage, which is storage used specifically to create volumes for instances to use by themselves or to share. Either way, it is not deleted when the instances that are using them are. Block storage is just like your NFS or SAN devices that are also quite common in just about every datacenter.

Lets look at a typical SDI now that we know the players. This will be from the software side only. We are assuming that all hardware is installed correctly for the cloud to function in an appropriate way.

You create a virtual server instance (VM). You tell it to connect to a network so it can communicate with the internet: virtual LAN, virtual switch, connected to a virtual router, then connected to the internet companies physical router through the physical wires that tie your systems together.

You create a volume inside the virtual storage provider (there is normally a physical storage device connected to the cloud, but you use the cloud’s controls to make the volumes.

So, lets look at what you have:

  • Virtual Server Instance (vCPU, RAM, Local Storage)
  • Virtual Volume (Connected to Block Storage)
  • Virtual LAN (Gets an IP address and Gateway from cloud management tool)
  • Virtual Router (Connects Virtual LAN to Physical LAN)
  • Virtual Firewall (Restricts access to and from Virtual Server Instance)
  • Virtual Load Balancer (Makes sure that if you need Load Balancing technologies, it is there to provide the pools for functionality)

As you can see, it is the same as if it was all physical hardware, but virtual. That is the whole premise of SDI. I tell my clients “It’s just the same as a virtual datacenter. It has all the moving pieces except air condition and power cords”)

By Richard Thayer

Disaster Recovery And Business Continuity In 2016

Disaster Recovery And Business Continuity In 2016

Preparing For Anything

With 1,800,000,000 gigabytes of data created in the last year, the various causes of data loss and downtime such as human error, UPS failure, cyber-attacks, natural disasters, and IT equipment failure take on a great significance. Especially since most of these are entirely preventable. According to stats provided by SingleHop, 93% of businesses experiencing data center failures lasting 10 or more days go bankrupt within one year. 43% of companies that experience a disaster never reopen and only 6% of businesses without a disaster recovery plan survive in the long term.

Disaster Recovery & Business Continuity In 2016

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) is a less glamorous but compelling benefit of the cloud, encouraging the already high drive towards cloud adoption. However, there are fundamental compliance concerns that are spotlighted too.

[Free Video] Free 15-minute DR Assessment & Analysis >


Hybrid Infrastructure DRaaS

Cloud-based disaster recovery was initially adopted by large enterprises on one side of the spectrum, and start-ups on the other, both securing data in public clouds. However, business managers sometimes forget that cloud is simply a data vault, and once migrating data to the cloud consider disaster recovery planning to be achieved without actually creating any recovery strategies. DRaaS fills this gap.

Global research firm MarketsandMarkets predicts a compounded annual growth in the DRaaS market of 55.2% from 2013 to 2018, and rather than mere storage solutions, cloud disaster recovery providers help organizations store data, but also recover data to physical hardware, virtual machines, or other cloud environments. Hybrid infrastructure DRaaS solutions allow organizations to store essential data in on-site appliances while managing backups in the cloud, and TheInfoPro (451 Research’s service) found in interviews with IT and storage experts at more than 250 medium and large global organizations that companies are steadily adopting dedicated storage appliances for disaster recovery.

Compliance Concerns

The constantly changing global compliance landscape and regulations make it difficult for businesses to keep up, and it’s concerning that important aspects are sometimes missed or swept aside. Helping deal with this challenge, some organizations are installing dedicated regulatory program managers, but with a shortage of skills, many companies are reporting that senior management is lacking integrated response to regulatory reform. If only half of a business is compliant, it is essentially non-compliant.


Operational standards such as the EU Data Protection Regulation and ISO standards must be heeded, but data retention time frames also need to be considered. Requirements for retention of various payroll and/or company data varies from country to country, and most countries require adequate data protection measures be in place. DRaaS offers some control with automated backup processes, making electronic records easily accessible, but before utilizing the cloud, service provider security practices should be evaluated, including compliance with BCI standards, encryption of data at rest and in transit, and thorough data center monitoring and employee assessment.

As the growth in data presents new challenges at a range of levels, organizations can take advantage of newer cloud resources such as DRaaS, ensuring they make the most of the data explosion, rather than allowing it to hinder operations.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Smart Cities: What Will The Future Bring?

Smart Cities: What Will The Future Bring?

Evolving Into Smarter Cities

As the digital world empowers us and gives us access to more information than ever before, it comes as no surprise that ‘smart cities’ are quickly becoming a reality, and soon will become more commonplace across the globe. Governments across the world are keen for their cities to become part of a environment that allows cloud-connected devices to collect data about a city’s surroundings and inhabitants.

While this may sound a little intrusive at first, it’s worth remembering that to make a city a success, data has to be collected in some form. Before the birth of the Internet, this may have been done in a number of ways. For example, if something was damaged within the city, then someone would report it and then it would be rectified.


(Infographic Source:

Cutting Out The Middleman

The aim of a smart city is to cut out the middleman, and offer those who reside in the city a more pro-active solution that will allow for the automation of data collecting via a number of different devices to create an infrastructure that looks to benefit the population of the city.

And while there a number of benefits for those who reside in the city, the businesses located within a smart city also look to benefit from the infrastructure. Those who use social networks will have at some point realized that they are faced with online adverts that suit their preferences. A similar practice can be implemented into a smart city, with businesses making offers based on your recent spending habits, and even the way you feel.

Connected Cars

The fact that a city is run by a series of connected devices could even change the way we travel. There’s no mistake that driverless cars are the catalyst for smart cities, and while driverless cars are still to make their debut officially, they will offer a number of benefits both for those being transported, and the environment overall.

Many drivers will have been caught up is some sort of traffic jam, or find themselves waiting in a huge line due to an accident that has occurred on the road. An autonomous car will be able to collect data from a range of different devices, advising the driverless car of the dangers ahead, which would therefore take the passenger to their destination via an alternative route.

This means that traffic managements is a more organized affair, and passengers should find that their ride into work is far cry from the long winded and stressful endeavor they’ve had to endure in the past.

As the driverless cars will be electric, the environment will benefit from cleaner air, which means the smart city itself will be a more desirable place to live. It also means that the urban population will become more efficient, and the over-burdening of public transport will become a thing of the past as shared rides become available.

Energy Monitoring

There also plans to monitor how energy is being used. The real-time stats that can be recorded will allow cities to reduce emissions, as well as saving the city money.

One project has already been launched by NYU’s Center for Urban Science and Progress within New York City’s Hudson Yards, and data will be monitored in relation to air quality energy production and pedestrian traffic among other things.

A similar initiative has been launched in Chicago. The Array of Things project looks to make Chicago a smart city by placing sensors throughout it. Add to this the similar initiatives launched in South Korea and it’s plain to see that steps are being taken to introduce smart cities globally.

Contingency Plan

cloud-recoveryThere are those who may scoff at the idea of a smart city, for fear that the data being collected is available to cyber criminals. While in theory, this isn’t out of the realms of possibility, the conversion to a smart city will be one where a great deal of research has to be carried out in relation to a robust security solution, as well as a contingency plan should the worst-case scenario scenario.

Many faults can be picked out of a world that conforming to embrace the digital era more than ever, but give the current financial climate of the world, having the ability to view real-time data in relation to a number of a different occurrences within the city allows those in charge to make pro-active decisions in the way we use energy, water and road vehicles.

Evidently, there will be a great deal of change associated with the conversion of cities across the globe, but up to now, may have adopted rapid changes within the technological world with relative ease. As we rely on smart devices every day, it makes sense to use the technology available to shape a better and cleaner future.

By Paul Simpson

Countdown To A Successful Cloud Migration

Countdown To A Successful Cloud Migration

Successful Cloud Migration

The intrinsic benefits of the cloud such as rapid and affordable access to superior technology, reduced operational costs, and the lack of infrastructure overheads means organizations are moving, and will continue to move, from legacy to cloud environments. Though the service providers involved do their best to provide user-friendly products likely to improve business management and operations, the migration itself can be tricky.

10. Training

Ensuring a thorough knowledge of how your chosen cloud system works will ensure you and your team are able to take advantage of all of the benefits on offer. Training for both the migration and use of cloud services should be incorporated into your strategy. The time and money invested here will quickly provide meaningful returns.

9. Managed Cloud Services

Though costing more, managed cloud services provide more bang for your buck, ridding you of the burden of IT infrastructure and management. Unless you have reason to invest in and manage your own IT team and framework, a managed service will always be worth the premium.


(Infographic Source: Syntax)

8. Compliance and SLAs

Compliance can be a nightmare, but don’t let it be your problem. Ensure you have a signed service level agreement (SLA) in place before moving to the cloud mentioning all your organization’s requirements and service expectations. Some of the cloud compliance acts to consider include:

  • Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
  • Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)
  • Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI- DSS)
  • Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)
  • European Union Data Protection Directive
  • Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act
  • SB-1386

7. Impact on Staff

Carefully consider implications of cloud migration on staff. Database administrators, networking staff, and application experts may not be needed should you migrate, and specific regulations affecting your business in this regard will have to be careful studied.

6. Reporting Downtime or Outage

Ensure the cloud service you’re subscribing to notifies you of outages via SMS or email. Recording these details helps test your provider’s reliability. A transparent downtime reporting mechanism is another must-have that ensures your business doesn’t suffer from cloud disruptions.

5. Security

The security of the cloud is one of its essential benefits, relocating it out of physical disruption zones while providing enhanced cyber security. With major cloud players providing public cloud services as per ISO/IEC 27018:2014, you should treat this as the benchmark and insist on the same level of security from your provider.

4. Recovery Strategy

Reliable cloud providers will include disaster recovery strategies in their SLAs, and in the event of a failure you must be able to safely undo damaging processes and/or recover all data. Ensure your choice of service provider gives you complete control over your data while providing all of the necessary safety features.


3. Choosing the Right Partner

Typically, choosing a well-established and proven cloud service provider will ensure both smooth migration and convenient services that will improve your business operations. Check for transparent billing and be sure to understand the pricing structure before signing up. Be careful not to compromise on quality for a cheaper service.

2. Risk Assessment

Risk analysis prior to cloud migration allows you to assess what customizations you might require and helps ensure your provider can and will do what you need it to do. Be sure that legacy applications will run smoothly in the new cloud environment, and make any necessary changes before the move. And don’t forget that the relocation of your data to the cloud can be an incredibly time-consuming job.

1. What’s Moving

This isn’t an auction; everything doesn’t have to go. Once you’re certain that a move to the cloud is to your benefit, decide whether moving data, applications, IT infrastructure, and/or IT operations will provide the greatest advantage. Though starting a new business in the cloud can be extremely cost effective, more established businesses can take the time to move piece by piece as suits the organization best.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Building A Winning Business With The Cloud

Building A Winning Business With The Cloud

Building A Winning Business

Momentum Ventures identifies successful business models and puts brilliant minds and natural leaders to work for amplified, competition-beating solutions. Deliberately focusing their innovation, the organization insists they are “not looking to reinvent the wheel”, but instead target thriving online industries that show no signs of decline. Their leaders are dedicated to absorbing the knowledge and skills in their environments, striving to carve out their own space, and they maintain that “passion is not optional”. With the online travel sector continually growing, Momentum Ventures has once again invested their enthusiasm and business processes into this industry with Alio.

Don’t Wait for Opportunity to Knock

Momentum Ventures CEO, Matt Keezer, discusses the initial consideration of the Alio opportunity. With the organization consistently exploring new opportunities for market and portfolio growth, he believes the expansion into the US market was their next logical move. “We know that our counterparts south of the border do very well, and we believed that we should enter once we felt that we could enter from a position of strength. With the experience of successfully launching FlightHub in Canada, we felt that the timing was right for us to take that next step and take on the American online travel space.”

Matt Keezer - CEO

Strategies & Development

Momentum Ventures is clear about the fact that they are not venture capitalists, owing to the belief that this investment space can typically be inefficient. With a team that feels connected to their work, Momentum Venture’s strategy is rather to invest in businesses and people in whom exceptional potential is evident. Says Keezer, “We take great pride in building all our businesses in-house in our Montreal office, and believe we have a lot to offer in terms of mentorship and business support services. At the end of the day, it’s about being hands-on with everything we do.”

Alio’s business unit leader, Peter LaPointe, points out that case studies and trials weren’t necessary for Alio’s business development, considering how much had already been learnt about the Canadian market and industry with the development and launch of FlightHub.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The potential in the US market for a full-service brand such as Alio was evident, and considering their wealth of experience, LaPointe affirms that Momentum Ventures was “comfortable going all-in with it.” With the future carefully mapped, the team built a successful strategy to exploit all likely potential, and of the progress of the overall development, LaPointe notes, “No surprises, really. We were well prepared to get into this marketplace.” The stable foundation of FlighHub smoothed the process and offered a tested strategy. Says LaPointe, “The only fundamental shift was that we decided to move onto the cloud using Amazon Web Services. That move allows us to scale our data needs as we grow, and helps avoid costly hardware expenses.”

Momentum Ventures has a host of successful businesses and a passionate team that continues to better and build their portfolio. Hop over to FlightHub Reviews for more details about this service, or if you think you might be their next leader, take a look at the Momentum Ventures Challenge for a chance to work with and be mentored by their winning team.

By Jennifer Klostermann

How Data Science And Machine Learning Is Enabling Cloud Threat Protection

How Data Science And Machine Learning Is Enabling Cloud Threat Protection

Data Science and Machine Learning

Security breaches have been consistently rising in the past few years. Just In 2015, companies detected 38 percent more security breaches than in the previous year, according to PwC’s Global State of Information Security Survey 2016.

Those breaches are a major expense — an average of $3.79 million per company, according to the Ponemon Institute. And Juniper Research forecasts that by 2019, data breaches globally will cost $2.1 trillion — four times more than in 2015.

Every year, global spending on cybersecurity has been growing. Gartner’s estimates put that spending at $75.4 billion this year. Despite those mounting expenses, attackers are still playing on the offense side, breaching through the defenses. Operating in a sophisticated, flourishing underground economy where they specialize and freely sell their goods and services, hackers are evolving much faster than the defenses can adapt to keep up.

Daunting Tasks

One major struggle for security teams stems from the lack of visibility and the information silos — especially as they try to sift through an increasingly large amount of IT security data sources. In most publicized breaches, the companies monitoring systems worked as they should, generating intrusion alerts. But the sheer number of daily alerts — along with the large number of false positives — makes the security analysts’ job daunting and results in ignored alerts.


Increasingly, more organizations are turning to data science to help in rapid detection of breaches and to enable more efficient response. Called user and entity behavior analytics, or UEBA (a term coined by Gartner), this science can bridge the gap that no human can — helping to prioritize and reduce the number of alerts.

UEBA works by creating behavior-based models for cloud services (both for users and entities) and then analyzing activity against those models. Because they’re based on machine learning, the models continuously adapt depending on user behavior, and do so without the computers needing to be overtly programmed. For example, peer groups can be created based on data sets such as company databases and directories, user profiles and common user activities. Through UEBA, statistical models are applied to detect, in the right context, anomalies beyond the login — using factors such as a user’s login volume based on historic logs.

The process can quickly identify patterns that deviate from the “normal” behavior. Through this machine learning, computers can solve complex problems that require rich-data exploration, in environments where software engineering and humans alone cannot be successful. As a result, the number of security alerts will not only be significantly reduced from millions a day to hundreds, but they can be further prioritized to a short list of top alerts.

Fintech Detection

An analogy for how UEBA can help companies is the system that credit card institutions have in place for detecting fraudulent transactions. Rather than automatically flagging every single transaction over, say $10,000, or every user with a large number of transactions — or any other static threshold — the credit card companies use behavioral analytics to spot unusual activities among the billions of daily transactions. In the same way, UEBA can sift through massive datasets to flag potential breaches.


For organizations, this ability is especially important as cloud use is exploding and security practices still a question mark. The average enterprise sees 2 billion cloud-based transactions daily, and the traditional breach-detection methods are not keeping up in this data-rich environment. UEBA can be used against factors such as service action, service action category, number of bytes uploaded/downloaded and rate/time of access of services across a service action or even an entire cloud service provider to identify behavioral anomalies. The UEBA can be customized for each enterprise based on time, rate, level of use etc.

One challenge in detecting anomalies in cloud use is the noticeable pattern variation that results from corporate policies as well as users’ personal preferences. If the actual usage is the only piece that can be observed, the user-behavior model is incomplete because it lacks unobservable components such as use variations during different times of day of different days of the week, or the evolution of a user’s preferences and patterns over time. UEBA connects the dots because it can predict future usage, leading to a more precise anomaly detection process.

Empowering Security

Security vendors are seeing the advantages of UEBA and beginning to integrate it into their products and services. Gartner forecasts that by 2017, at least 25 percent of the major DLP and SIEM providers will add UEBA capabilities either natively or through partnerships and acquisitions. That means companies will be able to bolster their security defenses and gain better visibility into their data, empowering their security teams with more robust, context-aware tools.

Although the human factor will never likely be eliminated in the fight against attackers, providing better failsafe mechanisms against human error through machine learning is a vital next step.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Sekhar Sarukkai

Wearable Tech And Employee Well Being

Wearable Tech And Employee Well Being

The Key To A Healthy Business

Wearable tech has effectively rewritten the terms and conditions of employee wellness programs. Organizations can now give employees fitness trackers as part of wider policies, using the data gathered over a given period to offer employees incentives and rewards. The appeal is two-fold: it nudges individuals towards healthier and more productive lifestyles; but it also helps organizations and their employees to save money. In an environment where the competition for the top talent is fierce, such employee wellness programs are increasingly important tools for boosting morale and building loyalty – but there are some caveats. The schemes have attracted attention because of the potential threat to employee privacy and job security, as well carrying implications for Big Data.

Million Step Challenge

In 2015, BP’s ‘Million Step Challenge’ has attracted a lot of media attention. Part of a larger wellness program and in partnership with StayWell, a third party health company, BP are offering employees the chance to use their healthy lifestyles as a way of earning benefits on their healthcare plan. Once employees enrol, they get a free Fitbit tracker to help them keep track of their daily activity, and with every million steps they earn 500 wellness points, or half of their annual target. Other ways of meeting the annual points target include scheduling an annual physical, participating in a financial wellness class and completing local BP-organized wellness activities. For staff who prefer to be more independent, there’s also a mail-based program, which provides them with resources, tools and activities to help them to be healthier and more active.

The Wearable Future


(Image Source: PWC)

The strength of the BP scheme, then, lies in the unobtrusive way that wearables are used to challenge, support and reward. That is to say, instead of imposing Fitbits on employees and monitoring their performance, they’re part of a voluntary scheme that has real advantages for employees and their family, nudging them towards a healthier lifestyle and saving them money in the process. Just as Fordism emphasized the importance of taking care of the worker to improve efficiency and loyalty, so wellness programs and wearable tech offer modern businesses a way of improving the health and morale of their workforce.

The Wearable Enterprise

In stressing the opportunities of wearable tech for enterprise, it’s important not to lose sight of the reasons people are worried. It may be easy to present a picture in which wearables are used well and with good intentions, but it’s also possible to think of misuses. What if companies were to monitor more than just steps? For example, wearables could also monitor employees’ sleep patterns or detect health conditions. This raises legitimate questions of what employers are entitled to do with the data, how securely they store it and where to draw the line between work and leisure.


As more and more companies are thinking about how to make wearables work for their employees, it’s clear they face a number of implementation challenges. A recent study by PwC showed a clear generational gap between Millennials and older employees, with 77% of those aged 18 to 24 saying they would be willing to wear a wearable device if a company paid for it, which suggests that workforces may also be divided along generational lines. To convince employees and stakeholders, businesses are going have to be able to provide firm reassurances about the way in which data harvested through the program will be used and, most importantly, secured.

At the end of the day, the use of wearable tech in business should be about promoting wellbeing; achieve this and employee loyalty and productivity will follow. That’s also why it’s so important to address the criticisms and concerns. After all, any scheme that’s resented by employees is doomed from the off. Employees need to be able trust employers to handle their data ethically and securely.

If a scheme is smart and secure, then, fitness trackers can be a simple and effective way of improving health, productivity and general wellbeing.

By George Foot

The Future of Digital Currency

The Future of Digital Currency

The Future of Digital Currency

It may come as a surprise to learn that Bitcoin is only six years old, but has had more media coverage that any other type of currency, although the coverage hasn’t always been positive. Back in 2014, a half-billion dollars’ worth of Bitcoin vanished from an online exchange in Tokyo as well as the 24-year-old vice chairman of the Bitcoin Foundation being arrested after being charged with money laundering.

Add to this the drop in value seen over 2014 and 2015, and many may be tempted to take the advice of entrepreneur and investor Warren Buffett and ‘stay away.’ As such, it wasn’t long before many of Bitcoin’s critics were labelling the currency as dead in the water.

While it may have had some teething problems, there are those who have fully embraced Bitcoin and digital currency as a whole, and whether we like it or not, the underlying technology used within Bitcoin is here to stay.

What is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin is effectively an online currency, so while they can be used, purchased and sold online, you will never hold a physical Bitcoin. Instead, they are purchased online using your local currency. You will also need a secure platform to store your Bitcoins.

Rather than using up resources, Bitcoins are created by computers that go through a series of number-crunching exercises before going through each and every permutation one at a time. Although created via a digital platform, the process used can be compared to the mining of precious metals used to create local currency, with the value being determined on how difficult the Bitcoins were to produce.


(See Full Infographic At Visual Capitalist: 50 Bitcoin Facts)

As well as Bitcoin, there have been a plethora of other online currencies introduced into the marketplace. These include Litecoin, calling itself the ‘silver to Bitcoin’s gold,’ and offer a faster processing time than Bitcoin. A further introduction was Peercoin, which markets itself as an energy-efficient company. Peercoin state that the company is designed to have a 1 percent rate of inflation.

The Value of Digital Currency

Although it can be argued that the price of digital currency fluctuates far too much, if you were to read between the lines, you can get an overview on why digital currency is so popular. Firstly, it can be used anonymously. Although illegal sites such as Silk Road trade in Bitcoins, that’s not to say everyone who uses digital currency anonymously is a criminal.


(Infographic Source: Adweek)

Many people just prefer to go about their day-to-day activities without the world looking in, this could be in relation to the spending habits, or what they look at online. In this regard, Bitcoins are ideal for those who have grown a little tired of people sifting through your bank account every time you call up for some assistance.

As digital currency is decentralized, it offers online users are new way of exchanging money. ~If implemented in the correct way, Bitcoin and others like it could revolutionize the global economy, saving a small fortune on fees charged by banks and payment processors.


Despite the bad press associated with Bitcoin, the underlying premise is one that still proves to be interesting, and in most cases, effective. The fluctuating rate of some digital currencies can make people nervous about using it, especially in day to day scenarios. Nobody wants to spend more on their groceries because of a sudden decrease in value.

However, tailored in the right way, digital currency has a place in the online world, if not beyond. How it affects the global economy moving forward will really depend on how the online community embrace it moving forward.

By Paul Simpson

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

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A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

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Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

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How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

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Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

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Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

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Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

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The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Do Not Rely On Passwords To Protect Your Online Information

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Password Challenges  Simple passwords are no longer safe to use online. John Barco, vice president of Global Product Marketing at ForgeRock, explains why it’s time the industry embraced more advanced identity-centric solutions that improve the customer experience while also providing stronger security. Since the beginning of logins, consumers have used a simple username and password to…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

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How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…


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